It’s All on Before–Large Print Tract

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It’s All on Before
I was driving lately with a friend on one of the beautiful side roads in the Great Smokies of North Carolina. We came to a gate across the road, put there to prevent cattle from straying away from a piece of pasture land close by. When we were getting near the gate, my friend told me that a young man would be there to open it for us, and added: “Say a word to him about the Lord.”
Sure enough there he was; and as we approached he came out of a little hut that he had made to shelter himself from sun and storm while he earned his few cents daily by opening the gate for passersby.
His face was a remarkable one. It bore the unmistakable stamp of one who was mentally challenged; and yet it showed a brightness mixed with obvious simplicity that could not fail to strike the most casual observer. After a few words had passed, I asked him if he were happy.
“Oh, yes; quite happy,” he replied.
“But you have not much to make you happy here,” I said.
No words of mine can express the bright look that lit up his face. Pointing onward and upward, as if to a land far away, he said, “It’s all on before.”
No need to ask what he meant. The bright smile and the few words—so simple, and yet conveying so deep a reality—told of a portion that was his, far beyond anything this world could give—a prospect which all the wealth of this world could never purchase.
As we drove on down the road, my friend told me something of the gate-keeper’s history. A miserable home, drunken parents, great poverty, told the story of his earthly path. Five years before, at a mission-service, the old, old story of the grace of God and the love of Christ to sinners had reached and touched his heart. In a moment, as it were, all was changed for him. His life, up to that point so dark and hopeless, was lighted up with the brightness of a Savior’s love, known and enjoyed as a blessed reality. Earthly circumstances were unchanged; but what did that matter? It was, as he said, “all on before.”
“As it is written, Eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither have entered into the heart of man, the things which God hath prepared for them that love Him. But God hath revealed them unto us by His Spirit” (1 Corinthians 2:9-10).
“For God so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish, but have everlasting life” (John 3:16).

An Irish Soldier’s Sacrifice–Large Print Tract

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An Irish Soldier’s Sacrifice
In a cemetery on the Aisne River, in France, is the grave of a soldier. It is marked only by a simple cross, with no name; but it has upon it an inscription that arrests the attention of the passer-by.
During World War 1, this unknown soldier was a private of the Royal Irish Guards. A corporal of the West Yorkshire Regiment, who was in a hospital at Woolrich, told the story of the unknown hero who was buried with full military honors, his fellow-soldiers erecting the cross over his grave, and inscribing upon it the words—”He saved others; himself he could not save.” (See Mark 15:31).
The corporal’s story was that a detachment was sent to occupy a village near Rheims. As the corporal and his comrades passed down a narrow street and emerged into the open, a man in khaki ran out of a building shouting a warning. Immediately the crack of rifles rang out; the man fell dead. Running for cover, the West Yorkshire men fought and ultimately drove out the German soldiers. The story of the unknown soldier was then learned.
He had been taken prisoner by the Germans. Learning that an ambush had been set for the West Yorkshire men, the Irish soldier escaped in time to warn his on-coming comrades and save them from annihilation.
He could not be identified, as the Germans had removed his identification disk; hence the only words upon the cross which marked his grave were: “He saved others; himself he could not save.”
The Irish soldier gave his life to save his fellows.
Can they ever forget it? “Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends” (John 15:13).
And can we ever forget the still more wonderful self-sacrificing love of the Savior? He could have delivered Himself from His captors; for twelve legions of angels were at hand to do His bidding. But He came into the world to die—to give His life for others. To be the Savior of the world, nothing could deter Him from the path of devotion to His Father’s will. Had He saved Himself from the bitterness of that awful hour when, as the divinely appointed Lamb of God, He gave Himself on the cross for us, salvation could never have been offered to you and me.
Friend, in His deep, eternal love He gave Himself! He died that we might live. He bore the wrath of God to bring us into His full, unclouded favor. He saved others; BUT
“Himself He could not save,
Love’s stream too deeply flowed;
In love Himself He gave,
To pay the debt we owed.
Obedience to His Father’s will
And love to us—did all fulfill.”

God’s X-Rays–Large Print Tract

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God’s X-Rays
God has His spiritual X-rays!
“The Lord looketh on the heart” (1 Samuel 16:7). “His eyes behold, His eyelids try, the children of men” (Psalm 11:4). “Thou understandest my thought afar off” (Psalm 139:2). “I the Lord search the heart, I try the reins” (Jeremiah 17:10).
Would you and I like our inner history to be published or revealed? God’s X-rays reveal all. And if sin is not blotted out by atonement, the “plates” as it were will come up for judgment. No one can play with sin: it is a dreadful reality. God knows what we desire—imagine—think. He will bring every work into judgment.
Are you unmoved? As the tubercular spot is shown up by the X-rays, so your hidden sin will come to light at God’s investigation.
“Can any hide himself in secret places that I shall not see him? saith the Lord” (Jeremiah 23:24).
An evil man “hath said in his heart, God hath forgotten, He hideth His face; He will never see” (Psalm 10:11).
God’s answer is clear: “They consider not in their hearts that I remember” (Hosea 7:2). “I know the things that come into your mind” (Ezekiel 11:5).
Many who say, “I have done no one any harm… I have a clean sheet… I stand as good a chance as any,” boast unthinkingly. Some even stifle consciousness of wrong by vain talk. Let there be a deep sense of God’s permanent record that is being made, and they will speak less of themselves.
God’s X-rays have a subduing effect. They cannot lie. Nothing escapes His notice. Nothing is too small for His piercing investigation. Neither you nor I can blur it out, or blot it out. But “the blood of Jesus Christ, God’s Son, cleanseth us from all sin” (1 John 1:7).
There is a hope, a sure hope; there is one, and only one. All else fails. The blood of Christ never fails. Let guilt be acknowledged; let the precious atonement of the one Redeemer be realized. Then, and only then, there is “peace with God.”
Reader, God’s X-rays prevent all self-confidence. But the very One who knew all your guilt has provided complete salvation at infinite cost. God reigns through righteousness. It is grace abounding, grace triumphant. You and I have no “chance” of salvation in ourselves; but we are welcome NOW to a sure salvation in Christ.

Jesus Loves Me–Large Print Tract

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Jesus Loves Me
Often a long-forgotten sacred song learned in childhood is recalled years later and used of God to bring a lost soul to Christ. Little is much when God is in it! The mighty power of the simple truth contained in Anna B. Warner’s “Jesus loves me,” is shown in the following true story— the personally related experience of “a woman that was a sinner.”
She told it to the preacher following a gospel meeting during which he had noted the rapt attention of the woman unknown to him, and heard her irrepressible “Amen!”
“Why should I not praise Him, when He has done so much for me?” she exclaimed. “Oh, sir! you don’t know the depths from which Christ has brought me. Let me tell you my story.
“I had a good home; I had a good husband and children; but the curse of alcohol came on me and I became its slave. I broke my husband’s heart and our little home became a place of shame. I sold our furniture to buy the cursed stuff. In the early morning, when the men were on the street, on their way to work, I would be out begging from them for the same purpose.
“But one morning when the burning thirst was consuming me I felt I would go crazy. I had come to the end of everything. Oh, how great is the mercy of our God! I don’t know why, but the words of a children’s hymn I had learned years ago when I was a little girl in Sunday school came into my mind:
“Jesus loves me, this I know
For the Bible tells me so;
Little ones to Him belong,
They are weak, but He is strong.
“Sir, I flung myself on my knees and bowed my head on a poor rickety chair left from our once happy home, and prayed: “Oh, Jesus, if there is a Jesus, take away from me this awful thirst and curse. I can do nothing to help myself. Help me to know Thy love and be one of Thy ‘little ones.’
“I got up from my knees a free woman. The thirst for alcohol was gone forever. I came to know the blessed Lord as my Savior. Don’t you think I ought to praise Him?”
“Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth My word, and believeth on Him that sent Me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life” (John 5:24).

Romans 1:1 The Gospel of God

Romans 1:1 says,
“Paul, a servant of Jesus Christ,
called to be an apostle,
separated unto the gospel of God.”

We are all servants or slaves of God or servants of our own lusts and desires. People love to think of themselves as free, bold agents of change. Apple used to encourage us to Think Different. Paul boldly says he’s a “servant” or “slave” of Jesus Christ.

But Paul was called to be the unique Apostle to the Gentiles. God took Paul out of what he was and made him into an Apostle. Paul didn’t “call the shots” and decide at 16 to set the goal of becoming an Apostle by age 30. From an injurious or “an insolent over-bearing man” as he describes himself in First Timothy chapter 1 and verse 13, he was changed into a gentle nourisher of dear children as he puts it in First Thessalonians chapter 2 and verse 7.
God’s calling takes someone out of one place to a completely new one. Remember that God did this with Abraham when he was called out of “Ur of the Chaldees” to be a “friend of God” when everyone around was a slave to their false gods. You can look that up in Joshua chapter 24 verses 2 and 3. And, beautifully, God is calling you as He’s called me. He wants to take us from where we were and put us into a whole new relationship with Himself.

Now we come to that wonderful expression “the gospel of God.” Let’s roll that one around in our minds again…. “the gospel of GOD”!
Here’s the best part. It’s not all about me, it’s not all about you, it’s all about God.
It’s His good news to man. He’s not offering 90% off on visas to heaven. You do your 10% part–He’ll do His.
The gospel is about His righteousness given and not looked for in the human race.
The United States Marines have a marketing slogan that they place next to images of beautifully engraved swords or handsome dress uniforms. You can almost see the chests swell with pride as you hear the words “Earned…Never Given.”

But God’s gospel is the opposite. As we discover in the book of Romans. The gospel is “GIVEN…never earned.”

But there IS a little bit about you and about me in this book of Romans. Here’s what I mean…
When I was shopping for an engagement ring more than 25 years ago I noticed the dark backgrounds and recessed lighting above the display cases. They provided a backdrop that allowed light from above to dance and sparkle from the diamond the jeweler wanted me to focus on.

God has a gem–His Son. He’s made Who His Son is and what He’s done—to be the central sparkling focus of the message He presents to us in…“the gospel of God”. Our sin, failure and helplessness provide the dark background that helps us to appreciate God’s gem.

That’s what you’ll discover as you study God’s presentation of His good news in the book of Romans.
So let’s lift our eyes from the dark background and start to focus together on God’s gem—His Son and His Son’s work.

Never Perish–Large Print Tract

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Never Perish
“My sheep… shall never perish” (John 10:27-28). These are the words of Jesus, the Son of God. He is the Good Shepherd who gave His life for the sheep; and now risen, He gives His own eternal life to the sheep. His own pledge is, “They shall never perish.”
No, He does not say, They shall never wander; He does not say, They shall never backslide; He does not say, They shall never stumble, but He does say, “They shall never PERISH.”
“Yes,” you say, “but there are other scriptures which, it seems to me, say that a believer may be finally lost.”
Wait a minute, let’s consider one scripture at a time. Does Christ say of His sheep, “They shall never perish?”
“Yes,” you reply, “but surely that must mean so long as they are faithful.”
But He says, “NEVER.”
Now which is right: your word, that a true believer may be lost after all, or Christ’s word, “They shall never perish?”
If “never perish” means anything, it means one cannot be finally lost. There are no ifs, buts, or conditions of any kind attached, but a bare, unqualified, absolute statement: “They shall NEVER PERISH.” You are bound to admit that at least one text of Scripture assures the true believer of final security. This being so, I have only to add that if there is any other scripture that appears to you to contradict or qualify this text, it must be that you do not understand that other; for, thank God, there is no possibility of misunderstanding such plain words as “never perish.”
My reader, you run no risk in venturing your soul on ONE WORD of the “God that cannot lie” and “cannot deny Himself.” Take this word as your main anchor, and wait on God to make clear any other that troubles you.
Do you think that you could by any possibility sink into hell at last if, as a poor sinner, you had taken Christ at His word and relied on His “NEVER PERISH?” If it could be so—with reverence I say it—all heaven would blush to find the Christ of God unfaithful to His pledge. No, beloved friend, Jesus Christ is “a tried stone, a precious stone, a sure foundation,” and “he that believeth on Him shall not be confounded” (1 Peter 2:6).