Things New and Old: Volume 14

A lady was once distributing tracts on board a steam-packet; and, amongst others, she handed one to a gentleman. She passed along the deck, and as she returned she was deeply pained to see him tear the tract in fragments and fling it overboard. She simply said, as she walked
Unseen by human eye, Abel fell—the anger of Cain had spent itself upon its victim—the earth was stained with human gore, and the only tongue, as Cain doubtless thought, that could have witnessed against him was motionless beside him. Death, which entered the world by
Christ Died! Then I Am Clean: " Not a Spot Within" -
The Appearing In Glory.
Ver. 15-18. "For this we say unto you by the word of the Lord, that we which are alive and remain unto the coming of the Lord, shall not prevent them which are asleep. For the Lord himself shall descend from heaven with a shout,
In thy further Meditations, Ο my soul, on the Christian's " Vocation" there is yet one department which thou wilt do well duly to consider; namely—The Christian's Warfare." Rare qualities are needed in warriors, and great honors are heaped on the victorious: but who
The Wars In Canaan Under Joshua.
" Wherefore take unto you the whole armor of God, that ye may he able to withstand in the evil day, and having done all, to stand." Here the apostle repeats the exhortation of verse 11. His own mind is deeply impressed with the frightful
The second piece of armor commended to the christian soldier is the breastplate, and the metal it is to be made of is righteousness—practical righteousness, blameless conduct, a holy walk with God. This gives courage in the day of battle. It would
We now come to the third piece of armor in the Christian's panoply. " And your feet shod with the preparation of the gospel of peace." This part of the armor distinctly refers to the Christian's walk. He is to go forth in peace—shod with peace;
Another piece, and another kind of armor, is now introduced—the shield of faith. It is for defensive warfare. It defends the soul from the assaults of the enemy. The first three parts, as we have seen, relate to the spiritual condition
The sword is the symbol of aggressive warfare. The first three parts of the armor protect us as to our own state, the second two are defensive, the sixth is aggressive. We have but one weapon to use against the enemy—the word of
The Romans professed to tolerate all religions, from which the commonwealth had nothing to fear. This was their boasted liberality. Even the Jews were allowed to live according to their own laws. What was it then, we may well ask, that could have caused all their severity to the
We now resume the narrative of events, and the next in order to be related, is The Martyrdom of Ignatius. There is no fact in early Church history more sacredly preserved than the martyrdom of Ignatius, the bishop of Antioch; and there is no narrative more celebrated than
But here we must pause for a little, and look around us. There is something deeper far in the change of government towards the Church than the merely historical eye can discern. We believe that we are now come to the close of the FIRST PERIOD and the opening
The behavior of the venerable bishop of Smyrna, in view of his martyrdom, was most christian and noble in its bearing. He was prepared and ready for Ids persecutors, without being rash or imprudent, as some at times, through excitement, had been. When he heard the
In tracing the silver line of God's grace in His beloved people, we have now to notice a report which was widely spread among the Christians after the beginning of the third century. It occurred towards the close of the reign of Aurelius, and led
Ignatius, in the course of his journey from Antioch to Rome,* wrote seven epistles. One to the Ephesians, Magnesians, Trallians, Romans, Philadelphians, Smyrneans, and one to his friend Polycarp. Being written on the eve of his martyrdom, and with great earnestness and vehemence, and having
It may be only fair to suppose that those good men, by whose means a new order of things was brought into the Church, and the free ministry of the Holy Spirit in the members of the body excluded, had the welfare of the Church
Christianity, under the successors of Aurelius, enjoyed a season of comparative repose and tranquility. The depravity of the contemptible Commodus was overruled to subserve the interests of the Christians after their long sufferings under his father; and the brief reign of many of the emperors left them no leisure
After the death of Septimus Severus—except during the short reign of Maximin—the Church enjoyed a season of comparative peace till the reign of Decius, a.d. 249. But during the favorable reign of Alexander Severus, a considerable change took place in the relation of Christianity to society.
As the name of Cyprian must be familiar to all our readers, and a name most famous in connection with the government and discipline of the Church, it may be well to notice particularly the serene fortitude of this father in the prospect of martyrdom.
Already the Church has passed through nine systematic persecutions. The first was under Nero, then Domitian, Trajan, Marcus, Severus, Maximin, Decius, Valerian, Aurelian. And now the fearful moment has arrived when she must undergo the TENTH, according to the prophetic word of the Lord: " Ye
Not long after the first edict had been carried into execution throughout the empire, rumors of insurrections in Armenia and Syria, regions densely peopled with Christians, reached the emperor's ears. These troubles were falsely attributed to the Christians, and afforded a pretext for a second edict. It was
1. "Ε. Μ.," Kentish Town. We dare not attempt to pronounce a judgment in such a case as you name. Speaking generally, we quite believe that a child seven years old, with sound mental faculties, is responsible, according to the measure of light and religious privilege
10. " C," London. We most cordially agree with all you say as to the importance, yea the absolute necessity, of all the teachers in the Sunday school being, not only converted, but also subject, in all things, to the authority of God's word, and the guidance of
19. " S. Μ.," Stowmarket. It is possible the papers on " Job and his Friends" may yet appear in a separate form. The good Lord will guide.
28. " S. Ε. Β.," London. 1 Cor. 16:2020All the brethren greet you. Greet ye one another with an holy kiss. (1 Corinthians 16:20) simply exhorts Christians to salute one another in holy love. The form of salutation may vary according to our national habits; but holiness and love must ever be the characteristics. What we want is spirit and
40. "A.," London. We can only render unfeigned thanks to God for the good tidings of your Sunday School. May the blessed work prosper abundantly! The monthly prayer meeting and the conference over the word are of the utmost possible importance. We feel assured that if the
67. "A Young Inquirer," London. Col. 2:99For in him dwelleth all the fulness of the Godhead bodily. (Colossians 2:9) sets forth the grand foundation truth of the essential Deity of our Lord Jesus Christ. We repeat, His Deity, and not merely His divinity. It is worthy of note that this is the only instance in the
74. "Α. Β. C." Scripture never says that Christ bore the sins of the world. We read, "Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world." (John 1:2929The next day John seeth Jesus coming unto him, and saith, Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world. (John 1:29).) And again, " He is the propitiation for the
85. " Η. Τ.," Plymouth. We have replied to a somewhat similar question in our July Correspondence.
94. " C. C. F. A." The parcel which you so kindly sent has come safely to hand. Accept our best thanks.
100. " D. Η.," Near Stroud. Thanks for your note and lines. You had better apply to Mr. Morrish direct for the desired information. We cannot supply it.
There is an utterance, in the twenty second Psalm, of deep and marvelous import—a sentence to which there is no parallel in the volume of God. It is this, " My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?" Never, we may safely say, was there such a
(Judg. 6—viii.)
There is one truth which shines out, with uncommon luster, in the Book of Judges, and that is, that God is ever to be counted upon, even amid the darkest scenes of human history; and, moreover, faith can always count upon God. God
Nothing can be more encouraging to the heart than the mode in which the Lord deals with the soul of Gideon—the way in which He prepares him for the course of action to which He was calling him. Gideon, like ourselves, was full of "ifs"
The more closely we study the narrative of the Lord's dealings with Gideon, the more we must be struck with the marvelous way in which He prepares him for his after course. Like all God's servants, in all ages, Gideon had to undergo a course of secret
We are now to contemplate Gideon called forth into action. He has received his commission from Jehovah. His questions have been answered, his fears hushed, his heart tranquillized, and he is enabled to build an altar. All this had reference to his own personal condition, to
We shall now ask the reader to open his Bible at the seventh chapter of the book of Judges. Here Gideon's companions are brought before us; and their history, as well as that of their leader, is full of interest and profit for us.
There is something peculiarly striking in the fact that out of the many thousands of Israel, in the days of Gideon, there were only three hundred men who were really fit for conflict with the Midianites—only this small band fit for the occasion. This truly is
Lines on the Martyrdom of a Roman Centurion.
I was journeying in the noontide, When His light shone o'er my road -And I saw Him in that glory -Saw Him—Jesus, Son of God. All around, in noonday splendor, Earthly scenes lay fair and bright—· But my eyes no longer see
In our last month's issue we gave the substance of a conversation between "little Theodore," and his brother, on the subject of the Lord's coming; we shall now furnish our readers with a striking reply given by the same dear child to his mamma, on the subject
" The word which God sent unto the children of Israel, preaching peace by Jesus Christ: he is Lord of all." Acts 10.'36.
He Is a Path, if Any Be Misled;
It is not our object, in the following pages, to dwell upon the ministry of the Baptist; nor yet upon the place which he filled in the history of God's dealings with Israel, deeply interesting as all this might be, and profitable too, inasmuch as his ministry was
We remember once hearing a very interesting account of a conversation between two little boys, on the subject of the Lord's coming. They had just been put to bed, and ere their kind attendant had left the room, she overheard the conversation which, in substance, we
In comparing these two inspired writings, we find many points of similarity, and many points of contrast. Both the prophet and apostle portray scenes of ruin, corruption, and apostasy. The former is occupied with the ruin of Judaism; the latter with the ruin of Christendom. {s
63.
We remember meeting somewhere a very striking incident which occurred on one of those vast and trackless prairies which abound on the continent of America. A party of travelers were making their journey under the conduct of an experienced guide, when suddenly they perceived him halting and looking very anxiously
68.
Thou art home at last, each waymark past,
We lately met with an old man, in the West of England, whose case interested us not a little. For forty-five years he had never entered any place of religious instruction. He was, however, induced by a friend to come under the sound of the