Offering, Offering Up

Matthew 2:11; Luke 23:36; Hebrews 9:14,25,28; Hebrews 10:12; Matthew 17:1; Luke 24:51; Hebrews 7:27; Mark 9:2; Hebrews 9:28; Hebrews 13:15; James 2:21; 1 Peter 2:5,24; Leviticus 14:20; Leviticus 17:8; Numbers 23:2,4,14,30; Hebrews 9:14; Hebrews 11:17
There were two distinct actions connected with the sacrifices. Any Israelite could bring an offering, or offer a gift, or a sacrifice; but only the priest could offer up the sacrifice on the altar to God. In the New Testament there are two Greek words translated “to offer.” One is προσφέρω, “to bring to,” “present.” This is used in Matthew 2:1111And when they were come into the house, they saw the young child with Mary his mother, and fell down, and worshipped him: and when they had opened their treasures, they presented unto him gifts; gold, and frankincense, and myrrh. (Matthew 2:11), of the wise men who “presented” their gifts unto the Lord. So too vinegar was “offered” to the Lord on the cross (Luke 23:3636And the soldiers also mocked him, coming to him, and offering him vinegar, (Luke 23:36)). The word is referred to the Lord in Hebrews 9:14, 25,2814How much more shall the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself without spot to God, purge your conscience from dead works to serve the living God? (Hebrews 9:14)
25Nor yet that he should offer himself often, as the high priest entereth into the holy place every year with blood of others; (Hebrews 9:25)
28So Christ was once offered to bear the sins of many; and unto them that look for him shall he appear the second time without sin unto salvation. (Hebrews 9:28)
and Hebrews 10:1212But this man, after he had offered one sacrifice for sins for ever, sat down on the right hand of God; (Hebrews 10:12). The other word is ἀναφέρω, “to bring up,” and hence “to offer up.” In Matthew 17:11And after six days Jesus taketh Peter, James, and John his brother, and bringeth them up into an high mountain apart, (Matthew 17:1), Jesus “bringeth up” Peter; and in Luke 24:5151And it came to pass, while he blessed them, he was parted from them, and carried up into heaven. (Luke 24:51) the Lord was “carried up” into heaven. This word is employed in Hebrews 7:2727Who needeth not daily, as those high priests, to offer up sacrifice, first for his own sins, and then for the people's: for this he did once, when he offered up himself. (Hebrews 7:27), both as to the high priest “offering up” sacrifices and to Jesus who “offered up” Himself. It occurs also in Mark 9:22And after six days Jesus taketh with him Peter, and James, and John, and leadeth them up into an high mountain apart by themselves: and he was transfigured before them. (Mark 9:2); Hebrews 9:2828So Christ was once offered to bear the sins of many; and unto them that look for him shall he appear the second time without sin unto salvation. (Hebrews 9:28); Hebrews 13:1515By him therefore let us offer the sacrifice of praise to God continually, that is, the fruit of our lips giving thanks to his name. (Hebrews 13:15); James 2:2121Was not Abraham our father justified by works, when he had offered Isaac his son upon the altar? (James 2:21) and 1 Peter 2:5,245Ye also, as lively stones, are built up a spiritual house, an holy priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacrifices, acceptable to God by Jesus Christ. (1 Peter 2:5)
24Who his own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness: by whose stripes ye were healed. (1 Peter 2:24)
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In the LXX the word προσφέρω is mostly a translation of qarab, “to draw near,” which constantly occurs in Leviticus and Numbers in the laws respecting the offering of sacrifices, and is translated “to offer.” On the other hand ἀναφέρω is chiefly the rendering adopted for alah, “to ascend, to make to ascend.” The word alah is frequently translated “to offer,” but only twice in Leviticus (Lev. 14:2020And the priest shall offer the burnt offering and the meat offering upon the altar: and the priest shall make an atonement for him, and he shall be clean. (Leviticus 14:20); Lev. 17:88And thou shalt say unto them, Whatsoever man there be of the house of Israel, or of the strangers which sojourn among you, that offereth a burnt offering or sacrifice, (Leviticus 17:8)); and four times in Numbers (Num. 23:2,4,14,302And Balak did as Balaam had spoken; and Balak and Balaam offered on every altar a bullock and a ram. (Numbers 23:2)
4And God met Balaam: and he said unto him, I have prepared seven altars, and I have offered upon every altar a bullock and a ram. (Numbers 23:4)
14And he brought him into the field of Zophim, to the top of Pisgah, and built seven altars, and offered a bullock and a ram on every altar. (Numbers 23:14)
30And Balak did as Balaam had said, and offered a bullock and a ram on every altar. (Numbers 23:30)
), when Balaam and Balak offered up sacrifices. Both Greek words are applied to Christ as to the offering of Himself (Heb. 9:1414How much more shall the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself without spot to God, purge your conscience from dead works to serve the living God? (Hebrews 9:14); Heb. 7:2727Who needeth not daily, as those high priests, to offer up sacrifice, first for his own sins, and then for the people's: for this he did once, when he offered up himself. (Hebrews 7:27)). They are both also used of Abraham offering Isaac; he gave Isaac, and as a priest virtually offered him up (Heb. 11:1717By faith Abraham, when he was tried, offered up Isaac: and he that had received the promises offered up his only begotten son, (Hebrews 11:17); James 2:2121Was not Abraham our father justified by works, when he had offered Isaac his son upon the altar? (James 2:21)).