Our Bible Portion: The God of All Comfort

2 Corinthians 1:3‑5  •  3 min. read  •  grade level: 13
“Blessed be God, even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies, and the God of all comfort, who comforteth us in all our tribulations, that we may be able to comfort them which are in any trouble, by the comfort wherewith we ourselves are comforted of God, For as the sufferings of Christ abound in us, so our consolation also aboundeth by Christ.”— 2 Cor. 1:3-53Blessed be God, even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies, and the God of all comfort; 4Who comforteth us in all our tribulation, that we may be able to comfort them which are in any trouble, by the comfort wherewith we ourselves are comforted of God. 5For as the sufferings of Christ abound in us, so our consolation also aboundeth by Christ. (2 Corinthians 1:3‑5).
HE is the God of all comfort, the source of every kind of consolation we receive now and for ever: and the last verse intimates that the suffering we endure is the natural and necessary result of His Son’s suffering on the Cross. Elsewhere He is described as the
The word comfort in these passages is the one from which “Paraclete” is derived, and hence the glorious God is pleased to reveal Himself as called to the side of His children who are in trouble, that He may render them needed help. He sends both the trouble and the help, and therefore the Psalmist says, “Thou, which has showed me great and sore troubles, shalt quicken me again, and shalt bring me up again from the depths of the earth. Thou shalt increase my greatness, and comfort me on every side.”—Ps. 71:20, 21. Again, he writes by the Spirit, “Cast thy burden [margin, gift, that which He has given thee] upon the Lord, and He shall sustain thee.”—Ps. 55:22: the word sustain being also rendered in other places, bear, feed, guide, nourish, provide and receive. Thus, when God gives a burden, it is that we may roll it upon His strong arm, and we look up with the cry, “Remember the word unto Thy servant, upon which Thou hast caused me to hope. This is my comfort in my affliction: for Thy word hath quickened me.”— Ps. 119:49, 50.
He not only comforts, but He sympathizes with those upon whom He lays the rod. Thus we read, “Comfort ye, comfort ye, My people, saith your God. Speak ye comfortably to Jerusalem.”—Isa. 40:1, 21Comfort ye, comfort ye my people, saith your God. 2Speak ye comfortably to Jerusalem, and cry unto her, that her warfare is accomplished, that her iniquity is pardoned: for she hath received of the Lord's hand double for all her sins. (Isaiah 40:1‑2). Here the first definition of the word comfort is “to sigh, to mourn, to grieve over, to feel compassion for, to pity,” while the word, “Speak comfortably,” is, literally, “Speak to the heart.” He expects the tenderness of His own heart, when He sends the rod of gentle chastening, to reach the heart of His suffering child, and drive away all fear. The Son of His love has taught us that two sparrows were sold for a farthing, and so cheap and worthless were they that if a man bought four, the seller threw in another for nothing: “and not one of them is forgotten before God. But even the very hairs of your head are all numbered.”—Luke 12:6, 76Are not five sparrows sold for two farthings, and not one of them is forgotten before God? 7But even the very hairs of your head are all numbered. Fear not therefore: ye are of more value than many sparrows. (Luke 12:6‑7). To His disciples, in the midst of great perils and privations, He said, “There shall not a hair of your head perish. In your patience possess ye your souls.” —Luke 21:18, 1918But there shall not an hair of your head perish. 19In your patience possess ye your souls. (Luke 21:18‑19).