Redemption: Part 4

 •  4 min. read  •  grade level: 4
Exodus 12:1-151And the Lord spake unto Moses and Aaron in the land of Egypt, saying, 2This month shall be unto you the beginning of months: it shall be the first month of the year to you. 3Speak ye unto all the congregation of Israel, saying, In the tenth day of this month they shall take to them every man a lamb, according to the house of their fathers, a lamb for an house: 4And if the household be too little for the lamb, let him and his neighbor next unto his house take it according to the number of the souls; every man according to his eating shall make your count for the lamb. 5Your lamb shall be without blemish, a male of the first year: ye shall take it out from the sheep, or from the goats: 6And ye shall keep it up until the fourteenth day of the same month: and the whole assembly of the congregation of Israel shall kill it in the evening. 7And they shall take of the blood, and strike it on the two side posts and on the upper door post of the houses, wherein they shall eat it. 8And they shall eat the flesh in that night, roast with fire, and unleavened bread; and with bitter herbs they shall eat it. 9Eat not of it raw, nor sodden at all with water, but roast with fire; his head with his legs, and with the purtenance thereof. 10And ye shall let nothing of it remain until the morning; and that which remaineth of it until the morning ye shall burn with fire. 11And thus shall ye eat it; with your loins girded, your shoes on your feet, and your staff in your hand; and ye shall eat it in haste: it is the Lord's passover. 12For I will pass through the land of Egypt this night, and will smite all the firstborn in the land of Egypt, both man and beast; and against all the gods of Egypt I will execute judgment: I am the Lord. 13And the blood shall be to you for a token upon the houses where ye are: and when I see the blood, I will pass over you, and the plague shall not be upon you to destroy you, when I smite the land of Egypt. 14And this day shall be unto you for a memorial; and ye shall keep it a feast to the Lord throughout your generations; ye shall keep it a feast by an ordinance for ever. 15Seven days shall ye eat unleavened bread; even the first day ye shall put away leaven out of your houses: for whosoever eateth leavened bread from the first day until the seventh day, that soul shall be cut off from Israel. (Exodus 12:1‑15); 1 John 1:77But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship one with another, and the blood of Jesus Christ his Son cleanseth us from all sin. (1 John 1:7); 1 Peter 1:18-1918Forasmuch as ye know that ye were not redeemed with corruptible things, as silver and gold, from your vain conversation received by tradition from your fathers; 19But with the precious blood of Christ, as of a lamb without blemish and without spot: (1 Peter 1:18‑19)
Part 4
We get the “how?” to eat the Passover. Further down the “who?” is to eat it, and in the 16th of Deuteronomy the “where?”
“How?” — “who?”— “where?”
Then we say, “who?” No unconverted person can truly keep the Passover—feed upon the death of Christ in the consciousness of being sheltered by the blood.
“And they shall eat the flesh in that night, roast with fire, and unleavened bread; and with bitter herbs they shall eat it. Eat not of it raw, nor sodden at all with water; but roast with fire; his head with his legs, and with the purtenance thereof.” How beautiful that is, typical you know.
“And ye shall let nothing of it remain until the morning; and that which remaineth of it until the morning ye shall burn with fire. And thus shall ye eat it; with your loins girded, your shoes on your feet, and your staff in your hand; and ye shall eat it in haste; it is the Lord’s passover.” There we get the “how”.
Why “not raw nor sodden at all with water, but roast with fire?”
Because it is typical of Christ, the Lamb of God enduring the fire of God’s judgment without any mitigation. No water came between the victim and the fire. The head—intelligence; legs—ways; the purtenance—affections. All perfect, and the soul feeds on that. The affections of Christ, devoted to God.
“That which remaineth of it until the morning ye shall burn with fire.” How do you understand that?
The feeding on the victim mustn’t be too far separated from its death. All intimately connected. You get it in the peace offering and the lamb of consecration. It is a very solemn thing for this day.
The worship of God’s people is so far separated from the cross of Christ the ground of worship.
Take those popular hymns (I am not finding fault, only calling attention to it), how much do we find in them about the death of Christ for atonement of sin? We have to go back to the old ones for that. How sweetly Watts comes out on that, in:
“Not all the blood of beasts,
On Jewish altars slain,
Could give the guilty conscience peace,
Or wash away its stain.
But Christ, the heavenly Lamb,
Took all our guilt away,
A sacrifice of nobler name,
And richer blood than they.
Our souls look back to see
The burden Thou didst bear,
When hanging on the accursed tree,
For all our guilt was there.”
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“Alas, and did my Saviour bleed?
And did my Sovereign die?
Would He devote that sacred head,
For such a worm as I?
Was it for crimes that I have done,
He groaned upon the tree?
Amazing pity! grace unknown!
And love beyond degree!
Well might the sun in darkness hide,
And shut His glories in,
When the Incarnate Maker died
For man His creature’s sin.”
One almost envies that devotedness. That is what I believe we have in “let nothing remain until the morning.”
They couldn’t gather manna today for tomorrow, except on the sixth day. Then they could gather for two days. If they did that any other day, and kept it over, it bred worms and stank. Every morning and every evening there was the lamb of the burnt offering, and on the Sabbath two. That is, God, in that typical people, that earthly redeemed people, kept ever before Him the coming death of Christ as the ground of His relationship with that people.
The 11Th verse, looks like they were prepared to depart.
“Thus shall ye eat it; with your loins girded, your shoes on your feet, and your staff in your hand.”
What would that bring before us, eating it in that way? How long is the Christian supposed to be in this world? The Christian position is to be ever ready to leave. He hasn’t to gird his loins and put his shoes on, but “Ye yourselves like unto men that wait for their Lord,”—waiting for that word to depart.
“Christ our passover is sacrificed for us.” It is an accomplished sacrifice. The Paschal Lamb. “Therefore, let us keep the feast ... ” The point in Corinthians is this: The feast is to be kept in consistency with this truth, that Christ our Passover is sacrificed for us. What is not consistent with that, is not to be allowed.
And the “where?”
(Concluded)