Reverence and Godly Fear

 •  3 min. read  •  grade level: 8
Today is for the Christian the day of service. Therefore, any zeal in this direction is good, for God's Word says, "It is good to be zealously affected always in a good thing" (Gal. 4:1818But it is good to be zealously affected always in a good thing, and not only when I am present with you. (Galatians 4:18)).
One has noticed of late among some of the young people an increased desire to reach out to others with the gospel, and some are asking questions as to using "You" instead of "Thou," "Thee," etc. in addressing or speaking of God. Paul's words to the Corinthians, "I am made all things to all men, that I might by all means save some," has been used as a reason to use language that is more commonly understood.
First of all, let us state emphatically that we are more than thankful for every desire and effort to reach others with the glad tidings, and also with true ministry for the souls of believers. Yet, we feel certain that God very carefully protects the deity of His beloved Son (who is God over all things, blessed forever) and also would warn us that "our God is a consuming fire." The verse preceding this in Heb. 12 exhorts us that "we receiving a kingdom which cannot be moved, let us have grace, whereby we may serve God acceptably with reverence and godly fear." So we clearly learn that respect and honor is always to be paid to God. As the psalmist says, "God is greatly to be feared in the assembly of the saints, and to be had in reverence of all them that are about Him." Psalm 89:77God is greatly to be feared in the assembly of the saints, and to be had in reverence of all them that are about him. (Psalm 89:7). And also, "Holy and reverend in His name" (Psalm 111:99He sent redemption unto his people: he hath commanded his covenant for ever: holy and reverend is his name. (Psalm 111:9)).
As to Paul's words to the Corinthians, "I am made all things to all men, that I might by all means save some," we notice that he is speaking about himself, not about his language. Paul was willing to spend and be spent for Christ, but never does he speak of God or Christ without deference or reverence.
Mary Magdalene received the wonderful message from Jesus in resurrection, "Go to My brethren, and say unto them, I ascend unto My Father, and your Father; and to My God, and your God" (John 20:1717Jesus saith unto her, Touch me not; for I am not yet ascended to my Father: but go to my brethren, and say unto them, I ascend unto my Father, and your Father; and to my God, and your God. (John 20:17)); but never should we reverse this and speak of our precious, holy Savior as our brother. The very expression is revolting to us.
On the mount of transfiguration Peter wist not what to say, and of course said the wrong thing. "Peter answered and said to Jesus, Master, it is good for us to be here: and let us make three tabernacles; one for Thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias." Mark 9:55And Peter answered and said to Jesus, Master, it is good for us to be here: and let us make three tabernacles; one for thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias. (Mark 9:5). In effect he was putting Jesus on the same level with men. God immediately closed up the scene, and the voice came out of the cloud, saying, "This is My beloved Son: hear Him." What a solemn lesson for us! Surely we should never equate our Lord and Savior with ourselves. Another has said, "God loves intimacy but not familiarity."