Sparrow (Tsippor, στρουθίον)

Psalm 84:3; Psalm 102:7; Matthew 10:29,31; Luke 12:6-7
It is supposed that various kinds of small birds are alluded to by these names, being so called because of their “chirping,” which would include the sparrow. The Hebrew word is often translated “bird,” but only twice “sparrow.” It is alluded to in the Psalms as a lonely one upon the housetop, and as such finding a house in the courts of God’s house (Psa. 84:33Yea, the sparrow hath found an house, and the swallow a nest for herself, where she may lay her young, even thine altars, O Lord of hosts, my King, and my God. (Psalm 84:3); Psa. 102:77I watch, and am as a sparrow alone upon the house top. (Psalm 102:7)). In Palestine sparrows are plentiful, and five were sold for two farthings, and yet the Lord said not one fell without His Father’s knowledge, adding “Ye are of more value than many sparrows.” If God cares for the birds (and here the diminutive is employed), surely He will care for His own beloved ones (Matt. 10:29, 3129Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing? and one of them shall not fall on the ground without your Father. (Matthew 10:29)
31Fear ye not therefore, ye are of more value than many sparrows. (Matthew 10:31)
; Luke 12:6-76Are not five sparrows sold for two farthings, and not one of them is forgotten before God? 7But even the very hairs of your head are all numbered. Fear not therefore: ye are of more value than many sparrows. (Luke 12:6‑7)). There are several species of sparrow in Palestine, the Passer cisalpinus, etc. The Petrocossyphus cyaneus, or blue thrush, may be alluded to.