The Adversary

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Psa. 90 begins the fourth book of the Psalms, with a most touching rehearsal of God's gracious ways to a delivered people.
"There was in a city a judge, which feared not God, neither regarded man: And there was a widow in that city; and she came unto him, saying, avenge me of mine adversary. And he would not for a while: but afterward he said within himself Though I fear not God, nor regard man; Yet because this widow troubleth me, I will avenge her, lest by her continual coming she weary me. And the Lord said, Hear what the unjust judge saith. And shall not God avenge His own elect, which cry day and night unto Him, though He bear long with them? I tell you that He will avenge them speedily" (Luke 18:2-82Saying, There was in a city a judge, which feared not God, neither regarded man: 3And there was a widow in that city; and she came unto him, saying, Avenge me of mine adversary. 4And he would not for a while: but afterward he said within himself, Though I fear not God, nor regard man; 5Yet because this widow troubleth me, I will avenge her, lest by her continual coming she weary me. 6And the Lord said, Hear what the unjust judge saith. 7And shall not God avenge his own elect, which cry day and night unto him, though he bear long with them? 8I tell you that he will avenge them speedily. Nevertheless when the Son of man cometh, shall he find faith on the earth? (Luke 18:2‑8)).
The widow of the city Zion is praying to the Lord for vengeance upon her adversary (the Assyrian), but at the same time she is accepting her circumstances from the Lord. The threat to her security is overwhelming, but she is one of God's elect, and although she is threatened, she has a sure Protector.
Psa. 91
The dialog of Psa. 91 sets forth the feelings of Jehovah and the nation of Israel, after the primary restoration of Judah and Benjamin and during the return of the ten tribes to their land again.
In the dialog the Lord says, "He that dwelleth in the secret place of the Most High shall abide under the shadow of the Almighty." They answer, "I will say of the LORD, He is my refuge and my fortress: my God; in Him will I trust." The Lord answers, "He shall cover thee with His feathers, and under His wings shalt thou trust."
This is the fulfillment of the desire in the breast of the Lord Jesus as He wept over Jerusalem. "How often would I have gathered thy children together, even as a hen gathereth her chickens under her wings, and ye would not!"
The entire twelve tribes will find their shelter under the wings of the Redeemer of Israel.
During the period of the restoration of the ten tribes of Israel, there will be deep conviction of heart, as they remember their ways. "There were great searchings of heart."
The heart must be right with Jehovah before He can give full deliverance from their enemies and remove the yoke of the Assyrian. "Is thine heart right, as my heart is with thy heart?"
The people of God, though delivered, will be under the threat of the enemy nations in siege about them, although the enemy will never touch one of the children of Israel again.
Zech 12:2
"I the LORD do keep it; I will water it every moment: lest any hurt it, I will keep it night and day."
All twelve tribes, having returned through the special providence of Jehovah, are dwelling safely, prospering in their own land. Covetous eyes lead the surrounding nations to lay siege to Jerusalem and environs (Zion).
"And He spake a parable unto them to this end, that men ought always to pray, and not to faint" (Luke 18:11And he spake a parable unto them to this end, that men ought always to pray, and not to faint; (Luke 18:1)).
In Psa. 94:66They slay the widow and the stranger, and murder the fatherless. (Psalm 94:6) there is a special prayer or supplication to God for vengeance. "They slay the widow." In complete dependence she says, "O LORD God, to whom vengeance belongeth; O God, to whom vengeance belongeth, show Thyself. Lift up Thyself, Thou judge of all the earth; render a reward to the proud."
"Unless the LORD had been my help, my soul had almost dwelt in silence."
The enemy, who will still be threatening, will come in like a flood, like unto the day of Noah, although he will lay siege at first for some time. Then he attacks Jerusalem; when this takes place, at the cry of the widow (remnant) the Lord will lift up a standard against him.
Can anything exceed the glory shown, as Jehovah, at the cry of His beleaguered people, roars out of Zion to completely crush those who would dare to touch the apple of His eye?