This Mountain

 •  4 min. read  •  grade level: 8
“Now therefore give me this mountain, whereof the Lord spake in that day; for thou heardest in that day how the Anakims were there, and that the cities were great and fenced: if so be the Lord will be with me, then I shall be able to drive them out, as the Lord said” (Joshua 14:1212Now therefore give me this mountain, whereof the Lord spake in that day; for thou heardest in that day how the Anakims were there, and that the cities were great and fenced: if so be the Lord will be with me, then I shall be able to drive them out, as the Lord said. (Joshua 14:12)).
Caleb asked for “this mountain.” A mountain in the Bible would speak of a couple of things. It would denote something unmovable or lasting, something that isn’t affected by circumstances or change. And our inheritance is just like that. We have “an inheritance incorruptible, and undefiled, and that fadeth not away” (1 Peter 1:44To an inheritance incorruptible, and undefiled, and that fadeth not away, reserved in heaven for you, (1 Peter 1:4)). A monetary inheritance can be spent, and even squandered by misuse or mismanagement. Besides, no matter how careful a person may be, every time they draw on an earthly inheritance the inheritance becomes less. However, not so with “the unsearchable riches of Christ” (Ephesians 3:88Unto me, who am less than the least of all saints, is this grace given, that I should preach among the Gentiles the unsearchable riches of Christ; (Ephesians 3:8)). We can draw on the bank of heaven time and time again, day by day, moment by moment, and there is still an unending, unceasing, unfailing, perpetual account at our disposal. The amount never lessens!
A mountain also figures that which is heavenly in character. The rest of 1 Peter 1:44To an inheritance incorruptible, and undefiled, and that fadeth not away, reserved in heaven for you, (1 Peter 1:4) reads, “ ... reserved in heaven for you.” Our inheritance is not connected with this world in any way; it is, strictly speaking, heavenly. We have never seen our blessings with the natural eye, but that does not mean that they are any less real to the eye of faith. Our blessings are spiritual and eternal. “While we look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen: for the things which are seen are temporal; but the things which are not seen are eternal” (2 Corinthians 4:1818While we look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen: for the things which are seen are temporal; but the things which are not seen are eternal. (2 Corinthians 4:18)). These things are ours for eternity!
As we have said a number of times, the inheritance of Israel was earthly and physical, but the blessings of the believer in this dispensation are heavenly and spiritual. Israel didn’t rightly value the blessing, and not until the Lord establishes them in the full good of what He intended for them, will they finally be fully and securely in the enjoyment of their inheritance. To this day they have never possessed all that was marked out for them. This is yet future. Today they are struggling for peace in their own strength and by their own devices, but the day is coming when, in the power of the Lord, and on the ground of pure sovereign grace, they will have peace and enjoy the good land. For us, we can never lose what we have in Christ, but the enjoyment of it depends on our obedience and willingness to walk in the practical good of it. How much is it true of us now? We cannot lose it, but we can lose the enjoyment of it, and very quickly too if we are not careful to maintain spiritual vitality on a daily basis.
Caleb also asked for the very part of the good land where the giants and high walls were. Not because it was a particularly lush part of the land, although truly it was. It was where they had cut down the grapes of Eshcol, and gathered the pomegranates and figs, but this was not Caleb’s reason for desiring that area. No, as the Scripture affirms he wanted to prove, that in the strength of the Lord, he was able to defeat the enemy and overcome the obstructions. He wanted to show that the Lord was sufficient and that He had not changed. For us, we have, “Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and today, and forever” (Hebrews 13:88Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and to day, and for ever. (Hebrews 13:8)). So often we choose what we think is going to be the path of least resistance. But this is not the way of faith. Faith meets the enemy head on in the power of the Lord, conquers, and enjoys the fruit and blessing as a result. This request did not spring from pride or self-confidence, no, not for a moment. It was the result of humility and confidence in One who had never failed him, who was greater than he, more powerful than the giants, and loftier than the high walls.
Was the Lord able for Caleb’s conquest? Indeed! He never disappoints real faith. As Philippians 4:1313I can do all things through Christ which strengtheneth me. (Philippians 4:13) reminds us, “I can do all things through Christ which strengtheneth me.” Then again in Romans 8:3737Nay, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him that loved us. (Romans 8:37): “We are more than conquerors through Him that loved us.”