Salvation

Luke 1:77; Luke 1:71; Philippians 2:12‑13; Hebrews 7:25  •  1 min. read  •  grade level: 9
This may be seen in various connections in scripture.
1. It has reference primarily to the judgment of God to which man is obnoxious by reason of sin. This is illustrated by the destruction of the firstborn (the strength) of Egypt when the destroying angel passed through the land. The Israelites were saved only through being sheltered by the blood of the Passover lamb. Salvation is based on God’s righteousness having been maintained and declared in the death of Christ, and hence is for the believer in Christ (Luke 1:7777To give knowledge of salvation unto his people by the remission of their sins, (Luke 1:77)).
2. Intimately connected with the above is the question of salvation from enemies carnal or spiritual. With Israel it was the former, as the Egyptians and the Canaanites. With Christians it is the latter, as sin, death, the world and the power of Satan. Salvation in this sense is by the power of God (Luke 1:7171That we should be saved from our enemies, and from the hand of all that hate us; (Luke 1:71)).
3. It has reference further to the actual physical condition of Christians which is met by the redemption of the body. In this sense salvation is hoped for. During the interval the Christian has to work out into result his own salvation—it was in the case of the Philippians their “own salvation” in contrast to the care exercised over them by Paul when present with them (Phil. 2:12-1312Wherefore, my beloved, as ye have always obeyed, not as in my presence only, but now much more in my absence, work out your own salvation with fear and trembling. 13For it is God which worketh in you both to will and to do of his good pleasure. (Philippians 2:12‑13); compare Heb. 7:2525Wherefore he is able also to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by him, seeing he ever liveth to make intercession for them. (Hebrews 7:25)).