2 Co. 11:32 KJV (With Strong’s)

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32
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ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
In
en (Greek #1722)
"in," at, (up-)on, by, etc.
KJV usage: about, after, against, + almost, X altogether, among, X as, at, before, between, (here-)by (+ all means), for (... sake of), + give self wholly to, (here-)in(-to, -wardly), X mightily, (because) of, (up-)on, (open-)ly, X outwardly, one, X quickly, X shortly, (speedi-)ly, X that, X there(-in, -on), through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), under, when, where(-with), while, with(-in). Often used in compounds, with substantially the same import; rarely with verbs of motion, and then not to indicate direction, except (elliptically) by a separate (and different) preposition.
Pronounce: en
Origin: a primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), i.e. a relation of rest (intermediate between 1519 and 1537)
Damascus
Damaskos (Greek #1154)
Damascus, a city of Syria
KJV usage: Damascus.
Pronounce: dam-as-kos'
Origin: of Hebrew origin (01834)
l the governor
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
ethnarches (Greek #1481)
the governor (not king) of a district
KJV usage: ethnarch.
Pronounce: eth-nar'-khace
Origin: from 1484 and 746
under Aretas
Aretas (Greek #702)
Aretas, an Arabian
KJV usage: Aretas.
Pronounce: ar-et'-as
Origin: of foreign origin
the king
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
basileus (Greek #935)
a sovereign (abstractly, relatively, or figuratively)
KJV usage: king.
Pronounce: bas-il-yooce'
Origin: probably from 939 (through the notion of a foundation of power)
kept
phroureo (Greek #5432)
to be a watcher in advance, i.e. to mount guard as a sentinel (post spies at gates); figuratively, to hem in, protect
KJV usage: keep (with a garrison). Compare 5083.
Pronounce: froo-reh'-o
Origin: from a compound of 4253 and 3708
the city
polis (Greek #4172)
a town (properly, with walls, of greater or less size)
KJV usage: city.
Pronounce: pol'-is
Origin: probably from the same as 4171, or perhaps from 4183
of the Damascenes
Damaskenos (Greek #1153)
a Damascene or inhabitant of Damascus
KJV usage: Damascene.
Pronounce: dam-as-kay-nos'
Origin: from 1154
with a garrison
phroureo (Greek #5432)
to be a watcher in advance, i.e. to mount guard as a sentinel (post spies at gates); figuratively, to hem in, protect
KJV usage: keep (with a garrison). Compare 5083.
Pronounce: froo-reh'-o
Origin: from a compound of 4253 and 3708
, desirous
thelo (Greek #2309)
to determine (as an active option from subjective impulse; whereas 1014 properly denotes rather a passive acquiescence in objective considerations), i.e. choose or prefer (literally or figuratively); by implication, to wish, i.e. be inclined to (sometimes adverbially, gladly); impersonally for the future tense, to be about to; by Hebraism, to delight in
KJV usage: desire, be disposed (forward), intend, list, love, mean, please, have rather, (be) will (have, -ling, - ling(-ly)).
Pronounce: thel'-o
Origin: or ἐθέλω (eth-el'-o), in certain tenses θελέω (thel-eh'-o), and ἐθελέω (eth-el-eh'-o), which are otherwise obsolete apparently strengthened from the alternate form of 138
to apprehend
piazo (Greek #4084)
to squeeze, i.e. seize (gently by the hand (press), or officially (arrest), or in hunting (capture))
KJV usage: apprehend, catch, lay hand on, take. Compare 4085.
Pronounce: pee-ad'-zo
Origin: probably another form of 971
me
me (Greek #3165)
me
KJV usage: I, me, my.
Pronounce: meh
Origin: a shorter (and probably originally) form of 1691
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More on:

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Cross References

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Ministry on This Verse

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Damascus.
Aretas.This Aretas was an Arabian king, and the father-in-law of Herod Antipas, upon whom he made war in consequence of his having divorced his daughter.
Herod applied to Tiberius for help, who sent Vitellius to reduce Aretas, and to bring him alive or dead to Rome.
By some means or other Vitellius delayed his operations, and in the mean time Tiberius died; and it is probable that Aretas, who was thus snatched from ruin, availed himself of the favourable state of things, and seized on Damascus, which had belonged to his ancestors.
 It was just the last thing one who sought his own glory would have repeated and recorded forever. No angelic visitors opened the bars and bolts of massive doors, nor blinded the eyes of the garrison: the apostle was let down in a basket through a window in the city wall. (Notes on 2 Corinthians 11:22-33 by W. Kelly)

J. N. Darby Translation

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32
In Damascus the ethnarcha of Aretas the king kept the city of the Damascenes shut up, wishing to take me;

JND Translation Notes

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a
i.e. the governor of the province.

W. Kelly Translation

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32
In Damascus the ethnarch of Aretas the king garrisoned the Damascenes’ city to seize me1;

WK Translation Notes

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1
Damascenes’ city: The more ancient copies read Δαμ. π. rather than Δαμ. π. and have no θέλων as in Text.Rec. (Notes on 2 Cor., p212)