Deliverance From the Power of Sin: Romans 6:6-23

{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{tcl36}tcl35}tcl34}tcl33}tcl32}tcl31}tcl30}tcl29}tcl28}tcl27}tcl26}tcl25}tcl24}tcl23}tcl22}tcl21}tcl20}tcl19}tcl18}tcl17}tcl16}tcl15}tcl14}tcl13}tcl12}tcl11}tcl10}tcl9}tcl8}tcl7}tcl6}tcl5}tcl4}tcl3}tcl2}tcl1}Romans 6:6‑23  •  12 min. read  •  grade level: 5
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Revised notes of a lecture on Rom. 6:6-236Knowing this, that our old man is crucified with him, that the body of sin might be destroyed, that henceforth we should not serve sin. 7For he that is dead is freed from sin. 8Now if we be dead with Christ, we believe that we shall also live with him: 9Knowing that Christ being raised from the dead dieth no more; death hath no more dominion over him. 10For in that he died, he died unto sin once: but in that he liveth, he liveth unto God. 11Likewise reckon ye also yourselves to be dead indeed unto sin, but alive unto God through Jesus Christ our Lord. 12Let not sin therefore reign in your mortal body, that ye should obey it in the lusts thereof. 13Neither yield ye your members as instruments of unrighteousness unto sin: but yield yourselves unto God, as those that are alive from the dead, and your members as instruments of righteousness unto God. 14For sin shall not have dominion over you: for ye are not under the law, but under grace. 15What then? shall we sin, because we are not under the law, but under grace? God forbid. 16Know ye not, that to whom ye yield yourselves servants to obey, his servants ye are to whom ye obey; whether of sin unto death, or of obedience unto righteousness? 17But God be thanked, that ye were the servants of sin, but ye have obeyed from the heart that form of doctrine which was delivered you. 18Being then made free from sin, ye became the servants of righteousness. 19I speak after the manner of men because of the infirmity of your flesh: for as ye have yielded your members servants to uncleanness and to iniquity unto iniquity; even so now yield your members servants to righteousness unto holiness. 20For when ye were the servants of sin, ye were free from righteousness. 21What fruit had ye then in those things whereof ye are now ashamed? for the end of those things is death. 22But now being made free from sin, and become servants to God, ye have your fruit unto holiness, and the end everlasting life. 23For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord. (Romans 6:6‑23)
This chapter may be justly called the chapter of the New Testament that shows how God has delivered us from what we were as children of Adam, from sin the sinful nature that is in us—and shows us, too, the real power for holiness of life and walk down here. The question of holiness is one raised on all sides today; and the fact that sin has power over them, instead of their having power over it, is what troubles many Christians. There are thousands of the Lord's people who are in this difficulty. But it is a remarkable thing that those who talk so much about holiness, and their difficulties as to it, often overlook what is to be found in this important chapter.
God will deliver us from sin and all its consequences when we are in glory; but there is also deliverance from its power now, although we still have it in us.
The word "holiness" is twice mentioned in this chapter, in verses 19 and 22, both of which verses speak of practical holiness of walk while in this world. It will help greatly to the understanding of this chapter to notice that its main truth is set forth in three consecutive verses -10, 11, and 12. I will first take them up as a whole, and afterward speak of them more in detail.
Verse 10 is what is true of Christ alone. In verse 11 the Spirit of God says, so to speak, "What is true of Him is true of you, because He took your place before God on the cross"; and faith believes this. Verse 12 is, "Carry it out in practice." We get first what is true of Christ. When the Spirit of God wants to teach us something about ourselves, He speaks of Christ first, then says, that "what is true of Him is equally true of you," and ends with, "Now carry it out." "Likewise" in verse 11 is very significant. Christ died unto sin once; likewise reckon yourselves to be dead indeed unto sin. Christ is now alive unto God; likewise reckon ye yourselves to be alive to God.
In verse 12 we get another word which is full of meaning -"therefore"—that is a conclusion drawn from what goes before. This verse implies two things. First, that the sin is in our mortal bodies; second, that instead of its having power over us, we have power over it.
If I say to a man, "Don't let that child come into this room," I imply that he has the power to keep him out. So when God says, "Let not sin reign," it implies that you have the power to carry it out.
This chapter unfolds the way of deliverance from the power of sin now, while we are down here in the body- "the end everlasting life" (v. 22). The end is coming by-and-by, the end of all exercises of soul, and trials and troubles. Precious thought! But let me now take up these verses a little more in detail.
In verse 10, as I said, is what is true of Christ only- "In that He died, He died unto sin once; but in that He liveth, He liveth unto God." I am quite sure that many of the Lord's people read this verse as if it said, "died for sin." But it is not so. What, however, does it mean when it says He "died unto sin once"? We will look at one or two scriptures that might help us, as it is very important to the understanding of the next verse, that we should catch its meaning. "He [that is, God] hath made Him to be sin for us, who knew no sin" (2 Cor. 5:2121For he hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him. (2 Corinthians 5:21)). What a wonderful truth! I cannot attempt to explain it, and I suppose we shall not fully comprehend it throughout eternity. He was not "made sin" in His life when He trod the earth in spotless purity. He was not "made sin" in the garden of Gethsemane when He prayed to the Father in such an agony that He sweat, as it were, great drops of blood. It was not then, but on the cross; when He hung there, and was forsaken of God, He was made sin. What passed between God and His Son during those three hours of darkness, we are not told; but at the close that cry was heard, "My God, My God, why hast Thou forsaken Me?" But Scripture is totally silent as to what took place during those hours when darkness covered all the land. God drew a veil over the scene. Dear friends, just think of it. God made Him to be sin for me (speaking individually), because nothing else would fit me for His presence in glory.
Have you ever noticed the difference between this verse in Corinthians and 1 Pet. 2:2424Who his own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness: by whose stripes ye were healed. (1 Peter 2:24)? "Who His own self bear our sins in His own body on the tree." There, you see, it is the sins-actual offenses committed. In 2 Cor. 5:2121For he hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him. (2 Corinthians 5:21), He was made sin; that is different. It is important to see that the Lord Jesus was not only there to bear our sins; but all the depth of our evil, sinful nature-sin, root and branch-came out before God then. He was made sin for us, who knew no sin.
The next scripture I will ask you to look at is Rom. 8:33For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh: (Romans 8:3): "For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending His own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh." That expression, "sin in the flesh," means sin in our flesh, as children of Adam. The evil of our nature not only came out before God, but was judged and condemned there and then. God there saw an end of it. This verse is very blessed—"God sending His own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh." It is not a mere, bare doctrine. Think of God's Son going under all the waves and billows of God's judgment! "God sending His own Son." Why does it say "own"? It reminds us of the love that the Father has to the beloved Son. Think how He loved His Son; or, as the Lord Jesus in Mark 12:66Having yet therefore one son, his wellbeloved, he sent him also last unto them, saying, They will reverence my son. (Mark 12:6) speaks of it, "Having yet therefore one Son, His well beloved." He had only one Son. We know how fond parents are of an only son. That does not express all. He must add something—"His well-beloved." So in Rom. 8:33For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh: (Romans 8:3) it is not dry doctrine, but a question of God's heart of love. The Spirit reminds us of it, so to speak. Just think of it! And think of that God who "sent Him," "spared not His own Son, but delivered Him up for us all"; and then think of that beloved Son "made... sin for us." When He was on the cross, sin in the flesh was judged and condemned. He alone could sustain that awful weight and not be crushed under it. He did sustain it. He said, "It is finished." "When Jesus therefore had received the vinegar, He said, It is finished: and He bowed His head, and gave up the ghost." John 19:3030When Jesus therefore had received the vinegar, he said, It is finished: and he bowed his head, and gave up the ghost. (John 19:30). Those who understand the Greek language say that the word for "gave up the ghost" means that He gave up the ghost by the action of His own will. He laid down His life, we know. He had "power to lay it down" (John 10:1818No man taketh it from me, but I lay it down of myself. I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it again. This commandment have I received of my Father. (John 10:18)).
Now in verse 10 of Romans 6, "He died unto sin once." The death of the Lord Jesus was the death of One who had undergone the judgment of God against sin, and had died to it. He died to sin—has done with it forever. He is never going to come in contact with it again in that way for all eternity.
The illustration given in verse 16 of Romans 6 will help us to understand the application of this to us. It speaks of sin being a master, and we its slaves. However tyrannical a master may be, a slave cannot get rid of him by giving notice to leave. However hard a master he may have, he is bound to him for life. But the time comes when that slave reaches a deathbed, and now he slips out of his master's grasp, out of that state and condition in which he was a slave; he dies to his master.
"In that He died, He died unto sin once." He has done with it forever. But have you ever seen that you are as clear as He is in God's sight? You do not question for a moment whether He is clear of it, but do you question whether you are free of it? If I am dead to sin, why should I feel this working of sin in me? Many think that verse 11 means, Carry this truth into practice; but it is rather that faith accepts what is true of me in God's sight; faith believes what God says, and thus we can reckon ourselves to be dead unto sin, because in God's sight we are so. What foolishness it would be for me to say to you, Reckon yourself to be the Emperor of Russia. Why? Because it is not true of you. But in God's sight we have as much died to sin as that blessed One has; and thus God can say to us, You may reckon yourselves to be dead unto sin.
I purposely did not quote just now the latter part of verse 10-"In that He liveth, He liveth unto God"-because I wish to look at it separately in connection with verse 11. When John was in the isle of Patmos, and saw One like unto the Son of man, he bowed at His feet. And He laid His right hand upon him. How would it feel to have the right hand of that living, glorified Christ laid upon you? He said to John. "Fear not; I am the first and the last, and the living One; and I became dead [that is the correct wording of it]; and, behold, I am alive for evermore." He is the living One. "In that He liveth, He liveth unto God." It is not simply that He is alive. I cannot explain it; but I suppose that Christ, as alive from the dead, need never be occupied with sin again, or come in contact with it as the sin-bearer. He is free from death, judgment, and sin forever.
Now comes our side of it. You may count that you live to God in the same way. Have you ever done that? It is just as much an exhortation to reckon yourselves to be alive unto God, as to reckon yourselves to be dead to sin. And in God's sight, as in Christ, we are as much delivered from sin as we shall actually be delivered from it when we shall be in glory. We have nothing about practice in this verse. It is faith believes what God says about me. God says, I have given Christ. He has died to sin; so have you. He is alive to God; so are you. As a matter of fact, for a time, just for a little while, sin is in you still; but it is not for long.
Verse 12. "Let not sin therefore reign in your mortal body." Now, as I said before, that verse proves first, that sin is there; but it says also that you need not obey it. Do not pay any attention to what it says, you need not obey it. See what a power that gives us—that we have done with it as much as Christ has. I have only got it in me for a short time while I am in this body, but I have not to obey it any more than the slave of whom I have spoken, if he were to be raised, would have to obey his old master. "No," he could say, "I have died out of your hands, and am beyond your control." The old master has no power to tell you to do anything. I can say, "I shall not pay any more attention to what he says now; he has no right over me."
There is one thing more. Not only do not obey him, but do not let sin, that old master, have the members of your body as instruments to use. You used to use them in the service of sin, but now they are no longer to be used in the service of sin; they are to be used as instruments of righteousness unto God. The eyes, feet, hands, and the tongue- these are the members of our body. Ah, the tongue! You remember what we read in Jas. 3:55Even so the tongue is a little member, and boasteth great things. Behold, how great a matter a little fire kindleth! (James 3:5) about the tongue- "Even so the tongue is a little member, and boasteth great things." And verse 6, too. Oh, how solemn! This is one of the members we are not to let sin have. So in verse 2, "In many things we offend all. If any man offend not in word, the same is a perfect man, and able also to bridle the whole body." I picked out this verse because the Spirit of God says that if you will not let sin have your tongue, you will be able to govern or bridle your whole body. How much the tongue can do! We often say things we are sorry for afterward. What mischief the tongue can cause! Yield not "your members as instruments of unrighteousness unto sin: but yield yourselves unto God." Sin may come in and try to usurp a claim over them, but do not let it.
I would just refer to one more verse in the end of the chapter (5:21): "What fruit had ye then in those things whereof ye are now ashamed?" But in verse 22, "Now,"—what have you got now that you are "become servants to God"? "Your fruit unto holiness, and the end" (there's the end, you see)—"the end everlasting life." Instead of death, the wages if sin, when that bright and blessed end comes, for us it is "everlasting life." Then we shall not only be delivered from the power of sin, but from its presence, too, and be holy and without blame before God in love.
But God looks at every believer as in Christ, as much delivered from sin now as we shall be in glory.
God grant that we may not give our members any more to the service of sin, but to His service who has done so much for us. Amen.