Ephesians 5

Ephesians 5  •  4 min. read  •  grade level: 5
But there are other elements. God is not only love but light; and inasmuch as this epistle reveals how fully God associates us with Christ according to His own nature, so having first shown us the privilege of loving, as He Himself loved us in Christ, now it shows that we are made “light in the Lord.” But it is not said that we are love. This would be too strong, yea, false. Love is God’s nature, but it is a sovereign prerogative in Him. In His own actings it has no motive or spring except in Himself. This could not be true of us. We need both motive and object, and hence could not be said to be love; because not we, but only God acts from Himself, as much as for Himself. Impossible that the creature could be or do so; and therefore the creature is never said to be love. But there is love after a divine sort in the new nature, which is said to be light, because this is the necessity of the new nature. Impossible that the new nature could countenance sin; the very essence of it is rejection and exposure of what is contrary to God. It is sensitive about sin; detects and detests it thoroughly. Hence we are said to be “light in the Lord,” and we need to shake off the things of death that encumber the light, and hinder it. And so Christ gives us more light. For the word is, “Awake, thou that sleepest, and arise from the dead, and Christ shall give thee light.” But just as before, in the walk which shuts out hatred, and anger, and so on, we were warned against grieving the Spirit of God; so the power of the Holy Spirit asserts itself here. Here it is not merely “Grieve not the Holy Spirit.” He goes farther, and says, “Be filled with the Spirit.” “Be not drunk with wine, wherein is excess; but be filled with the Spirit; speaking to yourselves in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody in your heart to the Lord.”
And is this all? It is not. There has been the full unfolding of God’s love, and the answer to it in the saints here below in their nature, and in the ways that manifest the new nature. But, besides, we have relationships; and now we have God manifesting Himself in each of our positions, and showing us that these are meant to give us opportunity of glorifying God by the good works that were before ordained of God. Accordingly he brings in the most important of them, first, the wife and the husband; then, children and their parents; and, finally, servants and masters.
All through these then we have, but more particularly in the first, the interweaving of the duty with the manifestation of God’s grace: “Christ also loved the church.” It is not now either sovereign love, or love of complacency. There was the sovereign love of God in Christ forgiving us; there was love of complacency, inasmuch as we were to love according to that love with which we were loved, as shown us in the matchless love of Christ. But now there is love of relationship as well; and here too Christ appears, who is the pattern and perfection of grace in every respect. “Husbands, love your wives, even as Christ also loved the church, and gave Himself for it; that He might sanctify and cleanse it with the washing of water by the Word, that He might present it to Himself.” Just look into this revelation of His love. How everything is connected with Christ! He gave Himself for us. What was it for? “That He might present it to Himself [not merely to the Father, but present it to Himself; a glorious church, not having spot, or wrinkle, or any such thing; but that it should be holy and without blemish.” More than this; for “no man ever yet hated his own flesh; but nourisheth and cherisheth it, even as the Lord the church.” Everywhere Christ Jesus Himself is intermixed with every portion. He Himself is the beginning, He Himself the end, He Himself all the way through. He gave Himself as the beginning; and He presents it to Himself as the end. Meanwhile He tenderly cares for the church. “He that loveth his wife loveth himself....for we are members of His body, of His flesh, and of His bones.” “This is a great mystery,” he adds at the close; “but I speak as to Christ and as to the church.”