kneading trough, store

Strong’s Dictionary of Hebrew Words:

Transliteration:
mish’ereth
Phonic:
mish-eh’-reth
Meaning:
from 7604 in the original sense of swelling; a kneading-trough (in which the dough rises)
KJV Usage:
kneading trough, store

From Manners and Customs of the Bible:

Exodus 12:3434And the people took their dough before it was leavened, their kneadingtroughs being bound up in their clothes upon their shoulders. (Exodus 12:34). The people took their dough before it was leavened, their kneading-troughs being bound up in their clothes upon their shoulders.
1. The dough was made by mixing flour with water, or, perhaps, with milk. It was then kneaded with the hands; in Egypt the feet also were used. When the kneading was completed leaven was generally added. See note on Matthew 13:3333Another parable spake he unto them; The kingdom of heaven is like unto leaven, which a woman took, and hid in three measures of meal, till the whole was leavened. (Matthew 13:33) (#666).
2. The kneading-troughs were either small wooden bowls, such as the Arabs now use for kneading dough, and into which their bread is put after it is baked, or they may have been similar to the leather utensil described by Pococke, Niebuhr, and other travelers. It is a round piece of leather, having iron rings at certain distances around it, through which a chain is passed, so that it may, when not in use, be drawn together like a purse and hung up. The Arabs, when they travel, sometimes carry dough in it, and sometimes bread.