Isaiah 19-23

Jehovah’s dealings with the nations; Israel delivered
In chapters 19-20 Egypt shall be smitten in that day; but Jehovah will heal it. Egypt, Assyria, and Israel shall together be blessed of Jehovah. Chapter 20 teaches us that it will be Assyria that leads Egypt captive. (Compare Daniel 11 at the end.) It will be observed here, that, in general, from chapters 13-17 there is deliverance. The scepter of the wicked is broken (ch. 14:5). The throne of David will be established in mercy (ch. 16:5). The Assyrian is destroyed-the Philistines subdued-Zion founded by Jehovah-Damascus reduced. The latter event introduces the evils of the last days. Only, as we have remarked, the gathering of the nations is for their destruction (Mic. 4:11-1311Now also many nations are gathered against thee, that say, Let her be defiled, and let our eye look upon Zion. 12But they know not the thoughts of the Lord, neither understand they his counsel: for he shall gather them as the sheaves into the floor. 13Arise and thresh, O daughter of Zion: for I will make thine horn iron, and I will make thy hoofs brass: and thou shalt beat in pieces many people: and I will consecrate their gain unto the Lord, and their substance unto the Lord of the whole earth. (Micah 4:11‑13)). Chapter 18, resuming the subject of chapter 17, shows us Israel as they are to be in their land in the last days-oppressed by the Gentiles, but in result brought back to God.
The overflowing scourge; universal overthrow
The chapters following chapter 18 do not, like the previous ones, tell of Israel’s deliverance, but of the invasion and overrunning of the nations before mentioned-the overflowing scourge. Egypt is overrun as well as Ethiopia, in which Israel had trusted. Babylon is overcome—Dumah and Kedar destroyed—Jerusalem is ravaged—Tyre falls. In short it is a universal overthrow, the central scene of which is the land of Canaan, but in which the whole world is included (ch. 24:4). Even the powers of heaven are overturned, as well as the kings of the earth upon the earth, giving place to the establishment of Zion, the mountain of Jehovah, as the center of power and blessing, the power of the serpent, the dragon that is in the sea, being annihilated.
The future fall of Babylon and Jerusalem
After this outline attention must be given to some details. It will be observed that Babylon and Jerusalem fall (ch. 21-22), one after the other, Jerusalem the last. Now it is quite evident that this connection of events is yet future. That which is said of Babylon and Jerusalem may have found its occasion in the capture of Babylon by Cyrus, and partly in the condition of Jerusalem when threatened by Sennacherib. But there was neither the connection nor the order of events noted in this prophecy. But Babylon is named in a manner that gives no clue whatever to its condition. The “desert of the sea” is a singular term to describe a city. But a dreadful invasion is before the prophet’s eyes, and Babylon falls. It comes like a whirlwind of the south, and the power of Babylon is at an end-we are not told in what manner.
Jerusalem, the valley of vision, is ravaged. The Persians and the Medes, who were the invaders of the preceding chapter, reappear here as attacking Jerusalem. There is no fighting outside; but, the city being taken, its inhabitants are bound or slain within it. Besides the prophetic revelations, this chapter contains also moral instruction of the deepest importance. In the first place all the wisdom of man is insufficient to ward off evil, if not accompanied by the power of God. When the city of God is in question, this wisdom, exercised in forgetfulness of the God who built and founded the city of His holiness, is an unpardonable sin (ch. 22:11). Again, that which is related here was, historically speaking, done by Hezekiah, of whom it is said he prospered in all his works. Outward blessing attended his labors; but, at the same time, the condition of the people, even with respect to these labors, was such that God could not pardon it. This is often the case: outward faith in doing the work of God, blessed by Him; corruption as to state of heart in the thing, which God will assuredly judge, and forgetfulness of God Himself and of their belonging to Him. This is when the people of God lean upon human means. We see also here one who held a settled office, according to man, in the government of the house of David, set aside with shame, and one chosen of God taking his place, all glory being given to him (a remarkable prefiguration of the setting aside of the false Christ, and the establishment of the true, in the last days). This prophecy gives room to suppose that the nations will attack Jerusalem when the Babylon of history is a desert. That which is Babylon in those days shall fall. Nevertheless Jerusalem, the object of the prophecies, shall be taken, its government changed; the usurper must yield his place to the chosen One of God.
The burden of Tyre shows us all the pride of human glory stained, and all the honorable of the earth brought into contempt. The occasion is the capture of Tyre by Nebuchadnezzar, but the prophecy goes farther-even to the days when her merchandise shall be holiness to Jehovah (ch. 23).