John 19:14 KJV (With Strong’s)

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14
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ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
And
de (Greek #1161)
but, and, etc.
KJV usage: also, and, but, moreover, now (often unexpressed in English).
Pronounce: deh
Origin: a primary particle (adversative or continuative)
q it was
en (Greek #2258)
I (thou, etc.) was (wast or were)
KJV usage: + agree, be, X have (+ charge of), hold, use, was(-t), were.
Pronounce: ane
Origin: imperfect of 1510
the preparation
paraskeue (Greek #3904)
readiness
KJV usage: preparation.
Pronounce: par-ask-yoo-ay'
Origin: as if from 3903
of the passover
pascha (Greek #3957)
the Passover (the meal, the day, the festival or the special sacrifices connected with it)
KJV usage: Easter, Passover.
Pronounce: pas'-khah
Origin: of Chaldee origin (compare 06453)
, and
de (Greek #1161)
but, and, etc.
KJV usage: also, and, but, moreover, now (often unexpressed in English).
Pronounce: deh
Origin: a primary particle (adversative or continuative)
about
hosei (Greek #5616)
as if
KJV usage: about, as (it had been, it were), like (as).
Pronounce: ho-si'
Origin: from 5613 and 1487
the sixth
hektos (Greek #1623)
sixth
KJV usage: sixth.
Pronounce: hek'-tos
Origin: ordinal from 1803
hour
hora (Greek #5610)
an "hour" (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: day, hour, instant, season, X short, (even-)tide, (high) time.
Pronounce: ho'-rah
Origin: apparently a primary word
: and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
he saith
lego (Greek #3004)
properly, to "lay" forth, i.e. (figuratively) relate (in words (usually of systematic or set discourse; whereas 2036 and 5346 generally refer to an individual expression or speech respectively; while 4483 is properly to break silence merely, and 2980 means an extended or random harangue)); by implication, to mean
KJV usage: ask, bid, boast, call, describe, give out, name, put forth, say(-ing, on), shew, speak, tell, utter.
Pronounce: leg'-o
Origin: a primary verb
unto the Jews
Ioudaios (Greek #2453)
Judaean, i.e. belonging to Jehudah
KJV usage: Jew(-ess), of Judaea.
Pronounce: ee-oo-dah'-yos
Origin: from 2448 (in the sense of 2455 as a country)
, Behold
eido (Greek #1492)
used only in certain past tenses, the others being borrowed from the equivalent 3700 and 3708; properly, to see (literally or figuratively); by implication, (in the perfect tense only) to know
KJV usage: be aware, behold, X can (+ not tell), consider, (have) know(-ledge), look (on), perceive, see, be sure, tell, understand, wish, wot. Compare 3700.
Pronounce: i'-do
Origin: a primary verb
your
humon (Greek #5216)
of (from or concerning) you
KJV usage: ye, you, your (own, -selves).
Pronounce: hoo-mone'
Origin: genitive case of 5210
King
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
basileus (Greek #935)
a sovereign (abstractly, relatively, or figuratively)
KJV usage: king.
Pronounce: bas-il-yooce'
Origin: probably from 939 (through the notion of a foundation of power)
!

Cross References

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Ministry on This Verse

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the preparation.
the sixth.Instead of [hektos ,] sixth, several MSS. and fathers have [tritos ,] third, as in the parallel place.
Behold.
 It was on our Thursday they ate, and on our Friday He suffered; but to the Jews it was one and the same day. Hence there was still time for such Jews as had been too much occupied with the mock trial and condemnation of our Lord to eat the passover if they did not legally defile themselves meanwhile. The preparation of the passover does not mean the 13th but the 14th Nisan. (Notes on John 19:1-15 by W. Kelly)
 It would seem that our evangelist may have adopted a different reckoning of hours, from midnight to noon, as we do. Certainly the Romans did for their civil day...And it suits all the mentions of hours in the Gospel of John excellently, besides falling in with Mark's, 3rd, 6th, and 9th hours of the natural day. But I do not venture to speak positively. (Notes on John 19:1-15 by W. Kelly)

J. N. Darby Translation

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14
(now it was the preparation of the passover; it was about the sixth hour;) and he says to the Jews, Behold your king!

W. Kelly Translation

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14
aNow it was [the] preparation of the passover; it was about sixth hour. And he saith to the Jews, Behold, your king.

WK Translation Notes

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a
sixth: It is well known that not Nonnus only in his poetical paraphrase of our Gospel gives "third" hour, but also five uncials and four cursives, either in the original text or in a correction, not to speak of less direct authorities. Still the weight of witnesses is overwhelming for ἕκτη, "sixth." It would seem that our evangelist adopted a different reckoning of hours, from midnight to noon, as we do. Certainly the Romans did for their civil day: see Plin. N. Hist. ii. 77; Censorinus de Die. Nat. xxiii.; Aul. Gell. N. Att. iii. 2; and Macrob. Sat. i. 3. And it suits all the mentions of hours in the Gospel of John excellently, besides falling in with Mark's 3rd, 6th, and 9th hours of the natural day from the sun. This serves to explain the otherwise singular message of Pilate's wife (Matt. 27:19), in which she spoke of suffering much "to-day in a dream because of him." To Procula as a Roman the day was reckoned from midnight; as the hours appear to be throughout our Gospel, but not in the Synoptists.
It is singular as showing the perplexity in minds of old as now that Jerome says in his breviary on Psalm 77: "Sic scriptum est in Matthaeo et Ioanne quod Dominus noster hors sexta crucifixus sit. Rursus scriptum est in Marco: quid hors tertia crucifixus sit. Error scriptorum fuit; sed multi episemum Graecum ς putaverunt esse γ: sicut et ibi error fuit scriptorum: ut pro Asaph, Isaiam scriberent" (Hier. Opp. vii. 1046, ed. Migne). Jerome's remedy was thus to correct the text, not of John, but of Mark; a correction of but one known cursive manuscript of the eleventh century, the margin of the later Syriac, and the Aeth. on which last says Bode (Pseudocrit. Millio-Beng. 265), "Habet omnino Aeth. sexta hora, idque ex Io. 19, 14. Nimirum Interpres Ioanni contradicere noluit." But it is the just retribution of these tamperings with scripture that they do not satisfy the desired aim; for John connects his sixth hour with what was before, possibly hours before, the hours specified by Mark, be it sixth or even third. Thus the violence done to the surest authority in Mark would no more reconcile the statements than the similar violence offered to the witnesses of John 19:14; for Mark specifies the time when our Lord was crucified as the third hour, John speaks of the time when Pilate took his seat on the tribunal to give sentence as about the sixth hour. To change the latter to the third, or the former to the sixth, if admissable in the face of the gravest adverse evidence, would not clear the truth but only give birth to fresh confusion.
The true state of the readings also thoroughly overthrows the efforts of some eminent Greeks and Latins, who try to explain the earlier hour as applicable to the Jewish outcry for the crucifixion, the later hour as the actual moment when the soldiers carried it into effect. But this is only neglect of scripture; for John predicates "about the sixth hour" of the outcry, Mark "the third hour" of the actual crucifixion. As there is no sufficient reason to doubt the accuracy of the seemingly conflicting texts of the second and fourth Gospels (in itself no mean evidence that the apparent discrepancy exhibits the genuine readings of both), and as the very slight variation of readings is easily accounted for by the desire thus to reduce them to harmony, the natural solution is that John's reckoning of time differs from that of the other evangelists. It will be found by comparing the various hours named in John 1:39, 4:6, 52, that the hours of the civil day suit as well after all as those of the natural (the last occasion apparently better), so as to confirm the different computation of John throughout. John 11:9 in no way opposes this, as being a general way of describing a working day, whatever the mode of computation; as for instance we can say so, who follow the style of the civil day from midnight. (Exp. of John, p.392-3)