Matt. 18:15 KJV (With Strong’s)

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15
Moreover
de (Greek #1161)
but, and, etc.
KJV usage: also, and, but, moreover, now (often unexpressed in English).
Pronounce: deh
Origin: a primary particle (adversative or continuative)
if
ean (Greek #1437)
a conditional particle; in case that, provided, etc.; often used in connection with other particles to denote indefiniteness or uncertainty
KJV usage: before, but, except, (and) if, (if) so, (what-, whither-)soever, though, when (-soever), whether (or), to whom, (who-)so(-ever). See 3361.
Pronounce: eh-an'
Origin: from 1487 and 302
thy
sou (Greek #4675)
of thee, thy
KJV usage: X home, thee, thine (own), thou, thy.
Pronounce: soo
Origin: genitive case of 4771
e brother
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
adephos (Greek #80)
a brother (literally or figuratively) near or remote (much like 1)
KJV usage: brother.
Pronounce: ad-el-fos'
Origin: from 1 (as a connective particle) and δελφύς (the womb)
shall trespass
hamartano (Greek #264)
properly, to miss the mark (and so not share in the prize), i.e. (figuratively) to err, especially (morally) to sin
KJV usage: for your faults, offend, sin, trespass.
Pronounce: ham-ar-tan'-o
Origin: perhaps from 1 (as a negative particle) and the base of 3313
against
eis (Greek #1519)
to or into (indicating the point reached or entered), of place, time, or (figuratively) purpose (result, etc.); also in adverbial phrases
KJV usage: (abundant-)ly, against, among, as, at, (back-)ward, before, by, concerning, + continual, + far more exceeding, for (intent, purpose), fore, + forth, in (among, at, unto, -so much that, -to), to the intent that, + of one mind, + never, of, (up-)on, + perish, + set at one again, (so) that, therefore(-unto), throughout, til, to (be, the end, -ward), (here-)until(-to), ...ward, (where-)fore, with. Often used in composition with the same general import, but only with verbs (etc.) expressing motion (literally or figuratively).
Pronounce: ice
Origin: a primary preposition
thee
se (Greek #4571)
thee
KJV usage: thee, thou, X thy house.
Pronounce: seh
Origin: accusative case singular of 4771
, go
hupago (Greek #5217)
to lead (oneself) under, i.e. withdraw or retire (as if sinking out of sight), literally or figuratively
KJV usage: depart, get hence, go (a-)way.
Pronounce: hoop-ag'-o
Origin: from 5259 and 71
and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
tell
elegcho (Greek #1651)
to confute, admonish
KJV usage: convict, convince, tell a fault, rebuke, reprove.
Pronounce: el-eng'-kho
Origin: of uncertain affinity
him
autos (Greek #846)
the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the comparative 1438) of the third person , and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons
KJV usage: her, it(-self), one, the other, (mine) own, said, (self-), the) same, ((him-, my-, thy- )self, (your-)selves, she, that, their(-s), them(-selves), there(-at, - by, -in, -into, -of, -on, -with), they, (these) things, this (man), those, together, very, which. Compare 848.
Pronounce: ow-tos'
Origin: from the particle αὖ (perhaps akin to the base of 109 through the idea of a baffling wind) (backward)
his fault
elegcho (Greek #1651)
to confute, admonish
KJV usage: convict, convince, tell a fault, rebuke, reprove.
Pronounce: el-eng'-kho
Origin: of uncertain affinity
between
metaxu (Greek #3342)
betwixt (of place or person); (of time) as adjective, intervening, or (by implication) adjoining
KJV usage: between, mean while, next.
Pronounce: met-ax-oo'
Origin: from 3326 and a form of 4862
thee
sou (Greek #4675)
of thee, thy
KJV usage: X home, thee, thine (own), thou, thy.
Pronounce: soo
Origin: genitive case of 4771
and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
him
autos (Greek #846)
the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the comparative 1438) of the third person , and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons
KJV usage: her, it(-self), one, the other, (mine) own, said, (self-), the) same, ((him-, my-, thy- )self, (your-)selves, she, that, their(-s), them(-selves), there(-at, - by, -in, -into, -of, -on, -with), they, (these) things, this (man), those, together, very, which. Compare 848.
Pronounce: ow-tos'
Origin: from the particle αὖ (perhaps akin to the base of 109 through the idea of a baffling wind) (backward)
alone
monos (Greek #3441)
remaining, i.e. sole or single; by implication, mere
KJV usage: alone, only, by themselves.
Pronounce: mon'-os
Origin: probably from 3306
: if
ean (Greek #1437)
a conditional particle; in case that, provided, etc.; often used in connection with other particles to denote indefiniteness or uncertainty
KJV usage: before, but, except, (and) if, (if) so, (what-, whither-)soever, though, when (-soever), whether (or), to whom, (who-)so(-ever). See 3361.
Pronounce: eh-an'
Origin: from 1487 and 302
hef shall hear
akouo (Greek #191)
to hear (in various senses)
KJV usage: give (in the) audience (of), come (to the ears), (shall) hear(-er, -ken), be noised, be reported, understand.
Pronounce: ak-oo'-o
Origin: a primary verb
thee
sou (Greek #4675)
of thee, thy
KJV usage: X home, thee, thine (own), thou, thy.
Pronounce: soo
Origin: genitive case of 4771
, thou hast gained
kerdaino (Greek #2770)
to gain (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: (get) gain, win.
Pronounce: ker-dah'-ee-no
Origin: from 2771
thy
sou (Greek #4675)
of thee, thy
KJV usage: X home, thee, thine (own), thou, thy.
Pronounce: soo
Origin: genitive case of 4771
brother
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
adephos (Greek #80)
a brother (literally or figuratively) near or remote (much like 1)
KJV usage: brother.
Pronounce: ad-el-fos'
Origin: from 1 (as a connective particle) and δελφύς (the womb)
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More on:

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Cross References

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Ministry on This Verse

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if.
Matt. 18:35• 35So likewise shall my heavenly Father do also unto you, if ye from your hearts forgive not every one his brother their trespasses. (Matt. 18:35)
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Lev. 6:2‑7• 2If a soul sin, and commit a trespass against the Lord, and lie unto his neighbor in that which was delivered him to keep, or in fellowship, or in a thing taken away by violence, or hath deceived his neighbor;
3Or have found that which was lost, and lieth concerning it, and sweareth falsely; in any of all these that a man doeth, sinning therein:
4Then it shall be, because he hath sinned, and is guilty, that he shall restore that which he took violently away, or the thing which he hath deceitfully gotten, or that which was delivered him to keep, or the lost thing which he found,
5Or all that about which he hath sworn falsely; he shall even restore it in the principal, and shall add the fifth part more thereto, and give it unto him to whom it appertaineth, in the day of his trespass offering.
6And he shall bring his trespass offering unto the Lord, a ram without blemish out of the flock, with thy estimation, for a trespass offering, unto the priest:
7And the priest shall make an atonement for him before the Lord: and it shall be forgiven him for any thing of all that he hath done in trespassing therein.
(Lev. 6:2‑7)
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Luke 17:3‑4• 3Take heed to yourselves: If thy brother trespass against thee, rebuke him; and if he repent, forgive him.
4And if he trespass against thee seven times in a day, and seven times in a day turn again to thee, saying, I repent; thou shalt forgive him.
(Luke 17:3‑4)
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1 Cor. 6:6‑8• 6But brother goeth to law with brother, and that before the unbelievers.
7Now therefore there is utterly a fault among you, because ye go to law one with another. Why do ye not rather take wrong? why do ye not rather suffer yourselves to be defrauded?
8Nay, ye do wrong, and defraud, and that your brethren.
(1 Cor. 6:6‑8)
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1 Cor. 8:12• 12But when ye sin so against the brethren, and wound their weak conscience, ye sin against Christ. (1 Cor. 8:12)
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2 Cor. 7:12• 12Wherefore, though I wrote unto you, I did it not for his cause that had done the wrong, nor for his cause that suffered wrong, but that our care for you in the sight of God might appear unto you. (2 Cor. 7:12)
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Col. 3:13• 13Forbearing one another, and forgiving one another, if any man have a quarrel against any: even as Christ forgave you, so also do ye. (Col. 3:13)
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1 Thess. 4:6• 6That no man go beyond and defraud his brother in any matter: because that the Lord is the avenger of all such, as we also have forewarned you and testified. (1 Thess. 4:6)
go.
thou hast.
 You belong to God; you are a child of God. Your brother has wronged you? Go you to him, and seek to set him right., It is the activity of love which the Lord Jesus presses upon His disciples. We are to seek the deliverance, in the power of divine love, of those who have wandered from God. The flesh feels and resents wrong done against itself. But grace does not shroud itself up in its own dignity, waiting for the offender to come and humble himself and own his wrong. (Remarks on Matthew 18 by W. Kelly)
 How does God feel about the child that has done wrong? His loving desire is to have him right. When the child is near enough to know the Father's heart he goes out to do the Father's will. (Remarks on Matthew 18 by W. Kelly)
 Love is bent on gaining the brother. So it is to him that understands and feels with Christ. It is not the offender, but thy brother that is the thought before the heart: (Remarks on Matthew 18 by W. Kelly)

J. N. Darby Translation

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15
But if thy brother sin against thee, go, reprovel him between thee and him alone. If he hear thee, thou hast gained thy brother.

JND Translation Notes

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l
See Note d, John 3.20.

W. Kelly Translation

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15
But if thy brother sin against theea, go, reprove him between thee and him alone. If he hear thee, thou hast gained thy brother.1

WK Translation Notes

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a
against thee: For I do not doubt, spite of the omission of "against thee," in a few MSS., that they are genuine, resting as they do on most ample ancient authority, and falling in exactly with the context, which is embarrassed by the omission — an omission easily accounted for by the similarity of their sound in a Greek’s mouth to the last two syllables of the preceding word.

Full Notes

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1
against thee:... the omission of εἰς σέ in Matthew 18 is read by Tischendorf in the eighth edition of his New Testament, following such slender evidence as the Sinai and Vat. MSS., two cursives, and fathers who cite loosely and insert as well as omit.
The mass of the uncials and cursives, and every ancient version known, save one, as far as I can speak, add the words, as Tischendorf did in his valuable seventh edition, and almost all editors, save Lachmann, including one so extreme as the late Dr. Tregelles, disposed as he was to the narrow line of a very few witnesses of extreme antiquity. Dean Alford even suggested hierarchical reasons as the motive for the omission, in order to enlarge the church’s discipline; but this seems questionable, especially as the Latins, ready enough for practice of that kind, give unanimous testimony to what limits the scope to individual trespass. (Bible Treasury 12:142-143)
against thee: For I do not doubt, spite of the omission of εἰς σέ, "against thee," in verse 15 (according to the Sinai and Vatican manuscripts, supported by three cursives, etc.), that they are genuine, resting as they do on most ample ancient authority, and falling in exactly with the context, which is embarrassed by the omission — an omission easily accounted for by the similarity of their sound in a Greek’s mouth to the last two syllables of the preceding word. (Notes on First Corinthians, p.88)

WK Verse Note

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(Note: Words in italics have been inserted from the J. N. Darby translation where the W. Kelly translation doesn’t exist.)