Acts 1:26 KJV (With Strong’s)

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26
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ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
And
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
they gave forth
didomi (Greek #1325)
to give (used in a very wide application, properly, or by implication, literally or figuratively; greatly modified by the connection)
KJV usage: adventure, bestow, bring forth, commit, deliver (up), give, grant, hinder, make, minister, number, offer, have power, put, receive, set, shew, smite (+ with the hand), strike (+ with the palm of the hand), suffer, take, utter, yield.
Pronounce: did'-o-mee
Origin: a prolonged form of a primary verb (which is used as an alternative in most of the tenses)
their
autos (Greek #846)
the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the comparative 1438) of the third person , and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons
KJV usage: her, it(-self), one, the other, (mine) own, said, (self-), the) same, ((him-, my-, thy- )self, (your-)selves, she, that, their(-s), them(-selves), there(-at, - by, -in, -into, -of, -on, -with), they, (these) things, this (man), those, together, very, which. Compare 848.
Pronounce: ow-tos'
Origin: from the particle αὖ (perhaps akin to the base of 109 through the idea of a baffling wind) (backward)
lots
kleros (Greek #2819)
a die (for drawing chances); by implication, a portion (as if so secured); by extension, an acquisition (especially a patrimony, figuratively)
KJV usage: heritage, inheritance, lot, part.
Pronounce: klay'-ros
Origin: probably from 2806 (through the idea of using bits of wood, etc., for the purpose
; and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
the lot
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
kleros (Greek #2819)
a die (for drawing chances); by implication, a portion (as if so secured); by extension, an acquisition (especially a patrimony, figuratively)
KJV usage: heritage, inheritance, lot, part.
Pronounce: klay'-ros
Origin: probably from 2806 (through the idea of using bits of wood, etc., for the purpose
fell
pipto (Greek #4098)
(which occurs only as an alternate in certain tenses); probably akin to 4072 through the idea of alighting; to fall (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: fail, fall (down), light on.
Pronounce: pip'-to
Origin: πέτω (pet'-o)
upon
epi (Greek #1909)
properly, meaning superimposition (of time, place, order, etc.), as a relation of distribution (with the genitive case), i.e. over, upon, etc.; of rest (with the dative case) at, on, etc.; of direction (with the accusative case) towards, upon, etc.
KJV usage: about (the times), above, after, against, among, as long as (touching), at, beside, X have charge of, (be-, (where-))fore, in (a place, as much as, the time of, -to), (because) of, (up-)on (behalf of), over, (by, for) the space of, through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), with. In compounds it retains essentially the same import, at, upon, etc. (literally or figuratively).
Pronounce: ep-ee'
Origin: a primary preposition
Matthias
Matthias (Greek #3159)
Matthias (i.e. Mattithjah), an Israelite
KJV usage: Matthias.
Pronounce: mat-thee'-as
Origin: apparently a shortened form of 3161
; and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
he was numbered
sugkatapsephizo (Greek #4785)
to count down in company with, i.e. enroll among
KJV usage: number with.
Pronounce: soong-kat-aps-ay-fid'-zo
Origin: from 4862 and a compound of 2596 and 5585
with
meta (Greek #3326)
properly, denoting accompaniment; "amid" (local or causal); modified variously according to the case (genitive association, or accusative succession) with which it is joined; occupying an intermediate position between 575 or 1537 and 1519 or 4314; less intimate than 1722 and less close than 4862)
KJV usage: after(-ward), X that he again, against, among, X and, + follow, hence, hereafter, in, of, (up-)on, + our, X and setting, since, (un-)to, + together, when, with (+ -out). Often used in composition, in substantially the same relations of participation or proximity, and transfer or sequence.
Pronounce: met-ah'
Origin: a primary preposition (often used adverbially)
the eleven
hendeka (Greek #1733)
one and ten, i.e. eleven
KJV usage: eleven.
Pronounce: hen'-dek-ah
Origin: from (the neuter of) 1520 and 1176
apostles
apostolos (Greek #652)
a delegate; specially, an ambassador of the Gospel; officially a commissioner of Christ ("apostle") (with miraculous powers)
KJV usage: apostle, messenger, he that is sent.
Pronounce: ap-os'-tol-os
Origin: from 649
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Cross References

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J. N. Darby Translation

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26
And they gave lots on them, and the lot fell on Matthias, and he was numbered with the eleven apostles.

W. Kelly Translation

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26
aAnd they gave lots for them; and the lot fell on Matthias; and he was numbered with the eleven apostles.

WK Translation Notes

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a
for them: The true reading, as attested by א, A, B, C, D (corr.), and many ancient versions, is αὐτοῖς (not αὐτῶν, as in D, E, the mass of cursives, etc.). The meaning is, "they gave lots for them." This meets the chief reasoning founded on the common text which Mosheim urges with his usual force against the view in which, he confesses, all the commentators agree (i.e., in representing Matthias as having been chosen an apostle by lot, agreeably to the ancient Jewish practice). It is evidently of no consequence who they were that set forth or appointed (ἔστησαν) the two: some, like Alford, arguing that the whole company thus produced them; others, like Mosheim, contending that it must in all propriety have been the eleven apostles. I think that the vagueness of the phrase, without a defined subject, shows that the stress laid on either side is a mistake. It suffices to say, that two candidates were brought forward, possessed, as far as either apostles or disciples could say, of adequate qualifications. The Lord alone could decide: to Him all looked after the manner so familiar to the people of God. But Mosheim's conclusion destroys the whole point, besides doing violence to the text by confounding κλῆρος "lot" with ψῆφος vote or suffrage. It would bring in man's will and voice where the prayer just offered was an abandonment of it for the intervention of the heart-searching God. This, no doubt, was natural to one who was swayed by Lutheran prejudice, and strengthened by the practice which undoubtedly prevailed (from the third century at latest), the assembly deciding by suffrage, not by lot, between the candidates proposed by those who took the lead in their affairs. There seems little difficulty in understanding a Hebraistic extension of the word "gave" (1 Sam. 14:41) for the more common "cast"; and as to the pronoun, it is as intelligible and correct in the dative, as in the genitive it is perplexing in sense, and, I think, inaccurate in form; for the article would be requisite with the substantive if it were the true reading.
Compare J. L. Moshemii de rebus Christianorum ante Const. M. Comm. Saec. Pr. § xiv. pp. 78-80. (Lect. Intro. to Acts, Cath. Epist., and Rev., p.9)