Acts 13:19 KJV (With Strong’s)

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19
And
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
when he had destroyed
kathaireo (Greek #2507)
to lower (or with violence) demolish (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: cast (pull, put, take) down, destroy.
Pronounce: kath-ahee-reh'-o
Origin: from 2596 and 138 (including its alternate)
i seven
hepta (Greek #2033)
seven
KJV usage: seven.
Pronounce: hep-tah'
Origin: a primary number
nations
ethnos (Greek #1484)
a race (as of the same habit), i.e. a tribe; specially, a foreign (non-Jewish) one (usually, by implication, pagan)
KJV usage: Gentile, heathen, nation, people.
Pronounce: eth'-nos
Origin: probably from 1486
in
en (Greek #1722)
"in," at, (up-)on, by, etc.
KJV usage: about, after, against, + almost, X altogether, among, X as, at, before, between, (here-)by (+ all means), for (... sake of), + give self wholly to, (here-)in(-to, -wardly), X mightily, (because) of, (up-)on, (open-)ly, X outwardly, one, X quickly, X shortly, (speedi-)ly, X that, X there(-in, -on), through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), under, when, where(-with), while, with(-in). Often used in compounds, with substantially the same import; rarely with verbs of motion, and then not to indicate direction, except (elliptically) by a separate (and different) preposition.
Pronounce: en
Origin: a primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), i.e. a relation of rest (intermediate between 1519 and 1537)
the land
ge (Greek #1093)
soil; by extension a region, or the solid part or the whole of the terrene globe (including the occupants in each application)
KJV usage: country, earth(-ly), ground, land, world.
Pronounce: ghay
Origin: contracted from a primary word
of Chanaan
Chanaan (Greek #5477)
Chanaan (i.e. Kenaan), the early name of Palestine
KJV usage: Chanaan.
Pronounce: khan-ah-an'
Origin: of Hebrew origin (03667)
, hek divided
kataklerodoteo (Greek #2624)
to be a giver of lots to each, i.e. (by implication) to apportion an estate
KJV usage: divide by lot.
Pronounce: kat-ak-lay-rod-ot-eh'-o
Origin: from 2596 and a derivative of a compound of 2819 and 1325
their
autos (Greek #846)
the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the comparative 1438) of the third person , and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons
KJV usage: her, it(-self), one, the other, (mine) own, said, (self-), the) same, ((him-, my-, thy- )self, (your-)selves, she, that, their(-s), them(-selves), there(-at, - by, -in, -into, -of, -on, -with), they, (these) things, this (man), those, together, very, which. Compare 848.
Pronounce: ow-tos'
Origin: from the particle αὖ (perhaps akin to the base of 109 through the idea of a baffling wind) (backward)
land
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
ge (Greek #1093)
soil; by extension a region, or the solid part or the whole of the terrene globe (including the occupants in each application)
KJV usage: country, earth(-ly), ground, land, world.
Pronounce: ghay
Origin: contracted from a primary word
to them
autos (Greek #846)
the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the comparative 1438) of the third person , and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons
KJV usage: her, it(-self), one, the other, (mine) own, said, (self-), the) same, ((him-, my-, thy- )self, (your-)selves, she, that, their(-s), them(-selves), there(-at, - by, -in, -into, -of, -on, -with), they, (these) things, this (man), those, together, very, which. Compare 848.
Pronounce: ow-tos'
Origin: from the particle αὖ (perhaps akin to the base of 109 through the idea of a baffling wind) (backward)
by lot
kataklerodoteo (Greek #2624)
to be a giver of lots to each, i.e. (by implication) to apportion an estate
KJV usage: divide by lot.
Pronounce: kat-ak-lay-rod-ot-eh'-o
Origin: from 2596 and a derivative of a compound of 2819 and 1325
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More on:

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Cross References

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when.
Chanaan.
Canaan.
he divided.

J. N. Darby Translation

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19
And having destroyed seven nations in the land of Canaan, he gave them their land as an inheritance.

W. Kelly Translation

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19
aand when he had destroyed seven nations in [the] land of Canaan, he gave them their land for an inheritance in about four hundred and fifty years.

WK Translation Notes

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a
in: In verses 19, 20 there is a notable difference from the common words. It is not giving by lot which is the point, though in itself true, as (by the least and lowest possible testimony) in the received text, but causing them to inherit their land. But here there is a more united front among the editors of late; for, excepting Dean Alford, almost all accept אABC, et al., and the ancient versions save the Syrr. and Aeth. This connects the date of 'about 450 years' with the accomplishment of the promised inheritance (under law, which made nothing perfect). The common text makes it the duration of the judges.
But it appears to me that the dative of epoch suits the sense of the critical text as distinctly as it disagrees with the common one. Both before and after this phrase the accusative is given to express a term of continuance, here only the dative. Now if the idea intended were the supply of judges for 450 years, the accusative would here also be the natural construction. At any rate, it is a date within which a certain action occurred, and not duration as in the other cases. If the oldest vouchers be accepted, it was in about 450 years that Israel was made to inherit this land, after the promise to `our fathers', i.e., from the birth of Isaac as the starting-point. Indeed so Junius and others take the common reading, not as the space for which judges were given, but in which God had fulfilled His promise at least provisionally, till judges were given in the low estate of His people. It cannot therefore be assumed that Paul assigns a duration of 450 years to the judges, and so invalidates the date (in 1 Kings 6:1) of 480 years from the Exodus to the founding of Solomon's temple. More than one period of considerable duration has been added to the space of the Judges which really fell within other assigned dates. But it suffices here to note that the extended space for judges drawn from the verses before us is illegitimate. Ussher (Works xii. 70; xiv. 340) firmly holds to the integrity of both the Hebrew and the Greek in both these scriptures, rejecting the bold conjectures of Luther and others as wholly needless and of course improper. (Exp. of Acts, p.185-6)
in: [Q. What is the difference in the use of the dative and accusative of time, as in Acts 13:20, etc.? B.]
A. When the dative is used for time, it is always viewed as one whole point or object; when the accusative, it is a space during which.
Thus, taking the common reading, judges characterized the period of 450 years, as we hear of them during forty years in the desert. (Ver. 18) So ἰκανῶ χρόνῳ in Acts 8:11, and Romans 16:24. Thus τρίτῇ ἠμέρᾳ and τρίτην ἠμέραν, would not have the same force, though in result the sense would be the same. In the first phrase I should think of that one day so characterized. With τρίην ἠμ,. I think of two days elapsed before. In a word the accusative is duration, as the dative is epoch, though in sense running often into one another. Thus, according to the common reading of the dative, in Acts 13:20, the statement would not be during 450 years, but up to, as far as, (i.e., counting from the end of the desert). Thus Joshua, elders, and Cushanrishathaim would have to be deducted say some forty-five years. And the chronology is in no way changed. But then the reading of the more ancient authorities gives a very different sense. (Bible Treasury 7:272)
in: though the critical reading of verses 19, 20, is that of the Revisers, they involve themselves in an ungrammatical rendering of ὠς ἕτεσιν κ. τ. λ. as if it were ὠς ἔτη "for about four hundred and fifty years," instead of "in about four hundred and fifty years." The distinctive use of the dative and accusative in questions of time should not be overlooked in the version, as it is not in the context. (Bible Treasury 13:336)