Acts 13:42 KJV (With Strong’s)

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42
And
de (Greek #1161)
but, and, etc.
KJV usage: also, and, but, moreover, now (often unexpressed in English).
Pronounce: deh
Origin: a primary particle (adversative or continuative)
when
exeimi (Greek #1826)
to issue, i.e. leave (a place), escape (to the shore)
KJV usage: depart, get (to land), go out.
Pronounce: ex'-i-mee
Origin: from 1537 and εἶμι (to go)
the Jews
Ioudaios (Greek #2453)
Judaean, i.e. belonging to Jehudah
KJV usage: Jew(-ess), of Judaea.
Pronounce: ee-oo-dah'-yos
Origin: from 2448 (in the sense of 2455 as a country)
were gone
exeimi (Greek #1826)
to issue, i.e. leave (a place), escape (to the shore)
KJV usage: depart, get (to land), go out.
Pronounce: ex'-i-mee
Origin: from 1537 and εἶμι (to go)
out of
ek (Greek #1537)
or ἐξ (ex) a primary preposition denoting origin (the point whence action or motion proceeds), from, out (of place, time, or cause; literal or figurative; direct or remote)
KJV usage: after, among, X are, at, betwixt(-yond), by (the means of), exceedingly, (+ abundantly above), for(- th), from (among, forth, up), + grudgingly, + heartily, X heavenly, X hereby, + very highly, in, ...ly, (because, by reason) of, off (from), on, out among (from, of), over, since, X thenceforth, through, X unto, X vehemently, with(-out). Often used in composition, with the same general import; often of completion.
Pronounce: ek
the synagogue
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
sunagoge (Greek #4864)
an assemblage of persons; specially, a Jewish "synagogue" (the meeting or the place); by analogy, a Christian church
KJV usage: assembly, congregation, synagogue.
Pronounce: soon-ag-o-gay'
Origin: from (the reduplicated form of) 4863
, the Gentiles
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
ethnos (Greek #1484)
a race (as of the same habit), i.e. a tribe; specially, a foreign (non-Jewish) one (usually, by implication, pagan)
KJV usage: Gentile, heathen, nation, people.
Pronounce: eth'-nos
Origin: probably from 1486
besought
parakaleo (Greek #3870)
to call near, i.e. invite, invoke (by imploration, hortation or consolation)
KJV usage: beseech, call for, (be of good) comfort, desire, (give) exhort(-ation), intreat, pray.
Pronounce: par-ak-al-eh'-o
Origin: from 3844 and 2564
that these
tauta (Greek #5023)
these things
KJV usage: + afterward, follow, + hereafter, X him, the same, so, such, that, then, these, they, this, those, thus.
Pronounce: tow'-tah
Origin: nominative or accusative case neuter plural of 3778
words
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
rhema (Greek #4487)
an utterance (individually, collectively or specially),; by implication, a matter or topic (especially of narration, command or dispute); with a negative naught whatever
KJV usage: + evil, + nothing, saying, word.
Pronounce: hray'-mah
Origin: from 4483
might be preached
laleo (Greek #2980)
to talk, i.e. utter words
KJV usage: preach, say, speak (after), talk, tell, utter. Compare 3004.
Pronounce: lal-eh'-o
Origin: a prolonged form of an otherwise obsolete verb
to them
autos (Greek #846)
the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the comparative 1438) of the third person , and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons
KJV usage: her, it(-self), one, the other, (mine) own, said, (self-), the) same, ((him-, my-, thy- )self, (your-)selves, she, that, their(-s), them(-selves), there(-at, - by, -in, -into, -of, -on, -with), they, (these) things, this (man), those, together, very, which. Compare 848.
Pronounce: ow-tos'
Origin: from the particle αὖ (perhaps akin to the base of 109 through the idea of a baffling wind) (backward)
β*
eis (Greek #1519)
to or into (indicating the point reached or entered), of place, time, or (figuratively) purpose (result, etc.); also in adverbial phrases
KJV usage: (abundant-)ly, against, among, as, at, (back-)ward, before, by, concerning, + continual, + far more exceeding, for (intent, purpose), fore, + forth, in (among, at, unto, -so much that, -to), to the intent that, + of one mind, + never, of, (up-)on, + perish, + set at one again, (so) that, therefore(-unto), throughout, til, to (be, the end, -ward), (here-)until(-to), ...ward, (where-)fore, with. Often used in composition with the same general import, but only with verbs (etc.) expressing motion (literally or figuratively).
Pronounce: ice
Origin: a primary preposition
the next
metaxu (Greek #3342)
betwixt (of place or person); (of time) as adjective, intervening, or (by implication) adjoining
KJV usage: between, mean while, next.
Pronounce: met-ax-oo'
Origin: from 3326 and a form of 4862
sabbath
sabbaton (Greek #4521)
the Sabbath (i.e. Shabbath), or day of weekly repose from secular avocations (also the observance or institution itself); by extension, a se'nnight, i.e. the interval between two Sabbaths; likewise the plural in all the above applications
KJV usage: sabbath (day), week.
Pronounce: sab'-bat-on
Origin: of Hebrew origin (07676)
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ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
β
or, in the week between, or, in the sabbath between.

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Cross References

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J. N. Darby Translation

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42
And as they went out they begged that these words might be spoken to them the ensuing sabbath.

W. Kelly Translation

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42
aAnd as they were going out, they kept beseeching that these words might be spoken to them on the following sabbath.

WK Translation Notes

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a
^ kept: Verse 42 has suffered not a little from both copyists and from commentators. The ordinarily received text instead of 'they' (αὐτῶν), has, with some cursives, the interpolation ἐκ τῆς συναγῶγης, which may have been due to the public lessons of early days, though more common in the passages taken from the historical books than in selections from the Epistles. But this addition, though unauthorized, does not contradict (though it may alter) the sense, like τὰ ἕθνη 'the Gentiles', which is made the subject of the sentence, to the confusion of the passage as a whole, and without the least to commend it in itself. The verse is quite general....
Dr. J. Bennett conceives that the critical reading of verse 42 points to the sense that they (i.e., Paul and Barnabas) entreated that the same things should be spoken to them (again). But this is quite a mistake. The true reading leaves us open to the people's thus entreating the apostles; which appears to me much more simple and becoming as well as ‘delightful’. Even Calvin, who understands the sense to be that Paul and Barnabas went out while the Jews were yet assembled, holds that they (the apostles) were then requested..., though he was misled by the misreading to think it was the Gentiles who made request. But what could have brought 'the Gentiles' to the synagogue on the first sabbath? It is easy to understand that they flocked there on the second; and doubtless this it was and yet more their heed, as well as the free grace proclaimed, which roused the envy of the unhappy Jews. But even this premature introduction of the Gentiles though unfounded does not yield so strange and repulsive a meaning as that Paul and Barnabas (!) entreated that their discourse should be spoken on the next sabbath. That souls struck by the truth might beseech that 'these things', blessed yet so startling, so momentous yet solemn, should be spoken to them again, is very intelligible, as it is the unforced sense of the true text. (Exp. of Acts, p.194-5)
following: Tyndale completely missed the point of time intended, for he took εἰς τὸ μεταξὺ σάββατον of the intervening week 'bitwene the Saboth dayes'. But this was from oversight of the later usage of μεταξύ which signifies 'after', not 'between' only, as Kypke, Ott, and others have noticed with illustrations. Calvin was quite wrong therefore in censuring here the Vulgate and Erasmus who were right; and still more is Beza to be blamed, because he was a better scholar than the great theologian he followed, and he ought to have known how thoroughly Josephus, Plutarch, and Clem., Rom. 44 (twice), justify the text of the Authorized Version against the marginal alternative. Dr. J. Lightfoot plainly confirmed it from his vast Rabbinical learning. (Exp. of Acts, p.195)