John 21:1 KJV (With Strong’s)

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1
After
meta (Greek #3326)
properly, denoting accompaniment; "amid" (local or causal); modified variously according to the case (genitive association, or accusative succession) with which it is joined; occupying an intermediate position between 575 or 1537 and 1519 or 4314; less intimate than 1722 and less close than 4862)
KJV usage: after(-ward), X that he again, against, among, X and, + follow, hence, hereafter, in, of, (up-)on, + our, X and setting, since, (un-)to, + together, when, with (+ -out). Often used in composition, in substantially the same relations of participation or proximity, and transfer or sequence.
Pronounce: met-ah'
Origin: a primary preposition (often used adverbially)
these things
tauta (Greek #5023)
these things
KJV usage: + afterward, follow, + hereafter, X him, the same, so, such, that, then, these, they, this, those, thus.
Pronounce: tow'-tah
Origin: nominative or accusative case neuter plural of 3778
Jesus
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
Iesous (Greek #2424)
Jesus (i.e. Jehoshua), the name of our Lord and two (three) other Israelites
KJV usage: Jesus.
Pronounce: ee-ay-sooce'
Origin: of Hebrew origin (03091)
showed
phaneroo (Greek #5319)
to render apparent (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: appear, manifestly declare, (make) manifest (forth), shew (self).
Pronounce: fan-er-o'-o
Origin: from 5318
himself
heautou (Greek #1438)
him- (her-, it-, them-, also (in conjunction with the personal pronoun of the other persons) my-, thy-, our-, your-) self (selves), etc.
KJV usage: alone, her (own, -self), (he) himself, his (own), itself, one (to) another, our (thine) own(-selves), + that she had, their (own, own selves), (of) them(-selves), they, thyself, you, your (own, own conceits, own selves, -selves).
Pronounce: heh-ow-too'
Origin: from a reflexive pronoun otherwise obsolete and the genitive case (dative case or accusative case) of 846
again
palin (Greek #3825)
(adverbially) anew, i.e. (of place) back, (of time) once more, or (conjunctionally) furthermore or on the other hand
KJV usage: again.
Pronounce: pal'-in
Origin: probably from the same as 3823 (through the idea of oscillatory repetition)
to the disciples
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
mathetes (Greek #3101)
a learner, i.e. pupil
KJV usage: disciple.
Pronounce: math-ay-tes'
Origin: from 3129
at
epi (Greek #1909)
properly, meaning superimposition (of time, place, order, etc.), as a relation of distribution (with the genitive case), i.e. over, upon, etc.; of rest (with the dative case) at, on, etc.; of direction (with the accusative case) towards, upon, etc.
KJV usage: about (the times), above, after, against, among, as long as (touching), at, beside, X have charge of, (be-, (where-))fore, in (a place, as much as, the time of, -to), (because) of, (up-)on (behalf of), over, (by, for) the space of, through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), with. In compounds it retains essentially the same import, at, upon, etc. (literally or figuratively).
Pronounce: ep-ee'
Origin: a primary preposition
the sea
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
thalassa (Greek #2281)
the sea (genitive case or specially)
KJV usage: sea.
Pronounce: thal'-as-sah
Origin: probably prolonged from 251
of Tiberias
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
Tiberias (Greek #5085)
Tiberias, the name of a town and a lake in Palestine
KJV usage: Tiberias.
Pronounce: tib-er-ee-as'
Origin: from 5086
; and
de (Greek #1161)
but, and, etc.
KJV usage: also, and, but, moreover, now (often unexpressed in English).
Pronounce: deh
Origin: a primary particle (adversative or continuative)
on this wise
houto (Greek #3779)
in this way (referring to what precedes or follows)
KJV usage: after that, after (in) this manner, as, even (so), for all that, like(-wise), no more, on this fashion(-wise), so (in like manner), thus, what.
Pronounce: hoo'-to
Origin: οὕτως (hoo'-toce) adverb from 3778
showed he
phaneroo (Greek #5319)
to render apparent (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: appear, manifestly declare, (make) manifest (forth), shew (self).
Pronounce: fan-er-o'-o
Origin: from 5318
himself.

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Cross References

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Ministry on This Verse

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1-11:  Christ appearing again to his disciples is known of them by the great draught of fishes.
12-14:  He dines with them;
15-17:  earnestly commands Peter to feed his lambs and sheep;
18-21:  foretells him of his death;
22-23:  rebukes his curiosity touching John.
24-25:  The conclusion.
these.
John 20:19‑29• 19Then the same day at evening, being the first day of the week, when the doors were shut where the disciples were assembled for fear of the Jews, came Jesus and stood in the midst, and saith unto them, Peace be unto you.
20And when he had so said, he showed unto them his hands and his side. Then were the disciples glad, when they saw the Lord.
21Then said Jesus to them again, Peace be unto you: as my Father hath sent me, even so send I you.
22And when he had said this, he breathed on them, and saith unto them, Receive ye the Holy Ghost:
23Whose soever sins ye remit, they are remitted unto them; and whose soever sins ye retain, they are retained.
24But Thomas, one of the twelve, called Didymus, was not with them when Jesus came.
25The other disciples therefore said unto him, We have seen the Lord. But he said unto them, Except I shall see in his hands the print of the nails, and put my finger into the print of the nails, and thrust my hand into his side, I will not believe.
26And after eight days again his disciples were within, and Thomas with them: then came Jesus, the doors being shut, and stood in the midst, and said, Peace be unto you.
27Then saith he to Thomas, Reach hither thy finger, and behold my hands; and reach hither thy hand, and thrust it into my side: and be not faithless, but believing.
28And Thomas answered and said unto him, My Lord and my God.
29Jesus saith unto him, Thomas, because thou hast seen me, thou hast believed: blessed are they that have not seen, and yet have believed.
(John 20:19‑29)
Jesus.
the sea.
 The application is limited to the earth, for they had known Jesus on earth. It is Paul who will give us the heavenly position of Christ and the assembly. But he has no place here. (John 21 by J.N. Darby)

J. N. Darby Translation

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After these things Jesus manifested himself again to the disciples at the sea of Tiberias. And he manifested himself thus.

W. Kelly Translation

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After these things Jesus manifested himself again to the disciples at the sea of Tiberias; and he manifested [himself] thus1.

WK Translation Notes

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-25 [whole chapter]: I think it is to be regretted that Mr. Garrod did not state the reasons for questioning the authorship of this chapter, unless his real desire be to prove for the good of others that there are no substantial grounds for a doubt. The external evidence is unexceptionable. A, B, C, D, E, G, H, K, L, M, P, S, U, X, Δ, are witnesses of the highest class, not to speak of cursive MSS. and a crowd of versions and fathers. Internally, I admit, the chapter has a special place and character; it is obviously of the nature of an appendix to the Gospel; but then it is St. John’s Appendix to his own Gospel. For who, save himself, would have included James and John as Zebedee’s sons after Thomas and Nathaniel? Further, John’s discerning eye of Love in verse 7 is in beautiful harmony with chapter 20:8, as Peter’s casting himself into the sea is in keeping with his going into the sepulcher before John, though the latter had arrived there first. So, it seems to me, there are striking links of analogy between the converse after supper in chap. 13 and in the scene here after they had dined, in the thorough restoration and the apostolic reinstatement of Peter, answering to his threefold denial, of which the Lord had warned him in John 13:38; all perfectly in the tone and line of an Apostle. Again, what more like the enigmatic intimations elsewhere in John (2 the temple; 3 new birth; 4 the well of water; 6 the bread, body, and blood, etc.) than the gracious reassuring of Peter (ver. 18) that his recent failure, after his too confident boast, would not deprive him of confessing Christ in the most glorious but naturally painful way, which has John himself for its subject, shrouded too under a similar veil, bespeaks his hand, and appears to me to link him with the Revelation which so fitly closes the Book of God. The two last verses admirably wind up the whole the true conclusion of a heart surpassed by none in love and reverence for Him of whom the Holy Ghost privileged him to testify, whose works, if every one were written, would more than fill the world itself.
Permit me to add that it would be well, on so serious a subject as God’s Word, to withhold the publication of a doubt, till we have examined the matter on all sides. For the natural mind is skeptical enough without help or incentives; and a mere question might raise doubts which might trouble many a soul in spite of the clearest light in answer to it, for the heart loves darkness. The first step of skepticism often is to unsettle people as to the particular human hand which God employed, and, this done, the way is more easy to deny that God employed any hand at all. (Christian Annotator 3:191)