2 Cor. 8:4 KJV (With Strong’s)

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4
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ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
Praying
deomai (Greek #1189)
to beg (as binding oneself), i.e. petition
KJV usage: beseech, pray (to), make request. Compare 4441.
Pronounce: deh'-om-ahee
Origin: middle voice of 1210
us
hemon (Greek #2257)
of (or from) us
KJV usage: our (company), us, we.
Pronounce: hay-mone'
Origin: genitive case plural of 1473
with
meta (Greek #3326)
properly, denoting accompaniment; "amid" (local or causal); modified variously according to the case (genitive association, or accusative succession) with which it is joined; occupying an intermediate position between 575 or 1537 and 1519 or 4314; less intimate than 1722 and less close than 4862)
KJV usage: after(-ward), X that he again, against, among, X and, + follow, hence, hereafter, in, of, (up-)on, + our, X and setting, since, (un-)to, + together, when, with (+ -out). Often used in composition, in substantially the same relations of participation or proximity, and transfer or sequence.
Pronounce: met-ah'
Origin: a primary preposition (often used adverbially)
much
polus (Greek #4183)
(singular) much (in any respect) or (plural) many; neuter (singular) as adverbial, largely; neuter (plural) as adverb or noun often, mostly, largely
KJV usage: abundant, + altogether, common, + far (passed, spent), (+ be of a) great (age, deal, -ly, while), long, many, much, oft(-en (-times)), plenteous, sore, straitly. Compare 4118, 4119.
Pronounce: pol-oos'
Origin: including the forms from the alternate πολλός
entreaty
paraklesis (Greek #3874)
imploration, hortation, solace
KJV usage: comfort, consolation, exhortation, intreaty.
Pronounce: par-ak'-lay-sis
Origin: from 3870
that we
hemas (Greek #2248)
us
KJV usage: our, us, we.
Pronounce: hay-mas'
Origin: accusative case plural of 1473
would receive
dechomai (Greek #1209)
to receive (in various applications, literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: accept, receive, take. Compare 2983.
Pronounce: dekh'-om-ahee
Origin: middle voice of a primary verb
the gift
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
charis (Greek #5485)
graciousness (as gratifying), of manner or act (abstract or concrete; literal, figurative or spiritual; especially the divine influence upon the heart, and its reflection in the life; including gratitude)
KJV usage: acceptable, benefit, favour, gift, grace(- ious), joy, liberality, pleasure, thank(-s, -worthy).
Pronounce: khar'-ece
Origin: from 5463
, and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
take upon us the fellowship
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
koinonia (Greek #2842)
partnership, i.e. (literally) participation, or (social) intercourse, or (pecuniary) benefaction
KJV usage: (to) communicate(-ation), communion, (contri-)distribution, fellowship.
Pronounce: koy-nohn-ee'-ah
Origin: from 2844
i of the ministering
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
diakonia (Greek #1248)
attendance (as a servant, etc.); figuratively (eleemosynary) aid, (official) service (especially of the Christian teacher, or technically of the diaconate)
KJV usage: (ad-)minister(-ing, -tration, -try), office, relief, service(-ing).
Pronounce: dee-ak-on-ee'-ah
Origin: from 1249
to
eis (Greek #1519)
to or into (indicating the point reached or entered), of place, time, or (figuratively) purpose (result, etc.); also in adverbial phrases
KJV usage: (abundant-)ly, against, among, as, at, (back-)ward, before, by, concerning, + continual, + far more exceeding, for (intent, purpose), fore, + forth, in (among, at, unto, -so much that, -to), to the intent that, + of one mind, + never, of, (up-)on, + perish, + set at one again, (so) that, therefore(-unto), throughout, til, to (be, the end, -ward), (here-)until(-to), ...ward, (where-)fore, with. Often used in composition with the same general import, but only with verbs (etc.) expressing motion (literally or figuratively).
Pronounce: ice
Origin: a primary preposition
the saints
hagios (Greek #40)
sacred (physically, pure, morally blameless or religious, ceremonially, consecrated)
KJV usage: (most) holy (one, thing), saint.
Pronounce: hag'-ee-os
Origin: from ἅγος (an awful thing) (compare 53, 2282)
.

Cross References

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Ministry on This Verse

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that.
2 Cor. 8:18‑19• 18And we have sent with him the brother, whose praise is in the gospel throughout all the churches;
19And not that only, but who was also chosen of the churches to travel with us with this grace, which is administered by us to the glory of the same Lord, and declaration of your ready mind:
(2 Cor. 8:18‑19)
;
Gen. 33:10‑11• 10And Jacob said, Nay, I pray thee, if now I have found grace in thy sight, then receive my present at my hand: for therefore I have seen thy face, as though I had seen the face of God, and thou wast pleased with me.
11Take, I pray thee, my blessing that is brought to thee; because God hath dealt graciously with me, and because I have enough. And he urged him, and he took it.
(Gen. 33:10‑11)
;
2 Kings 5:15‑16• 15And he returned to the man of God, he and all his company, and came, and stood before him: and he said, Behold, now I know that there is no God in all the earth, but in Israel: now therefore, I pray thee, take a blessing of thy servant.
16But he said, As the Lord liveth, before whom I stand, I will receive none. And he urged him to take it; but he refused.
(2 Kings 5:15‑16)
;
Acts 16:15• 15And when she was baptized, and her household, she besought us, saying, If ye have judged me to be faithful to the Lord, come into my house, and abide there. And she constrained us. (Acts 16:15)
;
1 Cor. 16:3‑4• 3And when I come, whomsoever ye shall approve by your letters, them will I send to bring your liberality unto Jerusalem.
4And if it be meet that I go also, they shall go with me.
(1 Cor. 16:3‑4)
the ministering.
2 Cor. 9:1,12‑14• 1For as touching the ministering to the saints, it is superfluous for me to write to you:
12For the administration of this service not only supplieth the want of the saints, but is abundant also by many thanksgivings unto God;
13Whiles by the experiment of this ministration they glorify God for your professed subjection unto the gospel of Christ, and for your liberal distribution unto them, and unto all men;
14And by their prayer for you, which long after you for the exceeding grace of God in you.
(2 Cor. 9:1,12‑14)
;
Matt. 10:42• 42And whosoever shall give to drink unto one of these little ones a cup of cold water only in the name of a disciple, verily I say unto you, he shall in no wise lose his reward. (Matt. 10:42)
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Matt. 12:50• 50For whosoever shall do the will of my Father which is in heaven, the same is my brother, and sister, and mother. (Matt. 12:50)
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Matt. 25:40,44‑45• 40And the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me.
44Then shall they also answer him, saying, Lord, when saw we thee an hungred, or athirst, or a stranger, or naked, or sick, or in prison, and did not minister unto thee?
45Then shall he answer them, saying, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye did it not to one of the least of these, ye did it not to me.
(Matt. 25:40,44‑45)
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Mark 14:7• 7For ye have the poor with you always, and whensoever ye will ye may do them good: but me ye have not always. (Mark 14:7)
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John 19:26‑27• 26When Jesus therefore saw his mother, and the disciple standing by, whom he loved, he saith unto his mother, Woman, behold thy son!
27Then saith he to the disciple, Behold thy mother! And from that hour that disciple took her unto his own home.
(John 19:26‑27)
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Acts 6:1‑7• 1And in those days, when the number of the disciples was multiplied, there arose a murmuring of the Grecians against the Hebrews, because their widows were neglected in the daily ministration.
2Then the twelve called the multitude of the disciples unto them, and said, It is not reason that we should leave the word of God, and serve tables.
3Wherefore, brethren, look ye out among you seven men of honest report, full of the Holy Ghost and wisdom, whom we may appoint over this business.
4But we will give ourselves continually to prayer, and to the ministry of the word.
5And the saying pleased the whole multitude: and they chose Stephen, a man full of faith and of the Holy Ghost, and Philip, and Prochorus, and Nicanor, and Timon, and Parmenas, and Nicolas a proselyte of Antioch:
6Whom they set before the apostles: and when they had prayed, they laid their hands on them.
7And the word of God increased; and the number of the disciples multiplied in Jerusalem greatly; and a great company of the priests were obedient to the faith.
(Acts 6:1‑7)
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Acts 9:39‑41• 39Then Peter arose and went with them. When he was come, they brought him into the upper chamber: and all the widows stood by him weeping, and showing the coats and garments which Dorcas made, while she was with them.
40But Peter put them all forth, and kneeled down, and prayed; and turning him to the body said, Tabitha, arise. And she opened her eyes: and when she saw Peter, she sat up.
41And he gave her his hand, and lifted her up, and when he had called the saints and widows, presented her alive.
(Acts 9:39‑41)
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Acts 11:29• 29Then the disciples, every man according to his ability, determined to send relief unto the brethren which dwelt in Judea: (Acts 11:29)
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Acts 24:17• 17Now after many years I came to bring alms to my nation, and offerings. (Acts 24:17)
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Rom. 15:25‑26• 25But now I go unto Jerusalem to minister unto the saints.
26For it hath pleased them of Macedonia and Achaia to make a certain contribution for the poor saints which are at Jerusalem.
(Rom. 15:25‑26)
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1 Cor. 16:1,3‑4,15• 1Now concerning the collection for the saints, as I have given order to the churches of Galatia, even so do ye.
3And when I come, whomsoever ye shall approve by your letters, them will I send to bring your liberality unto Jerusalem.
4And if it be meet that I go also, they shall go with me.
15I beseech you, brethren, (ye know the house of Stephanas, that it is the firstfruits of Achaia, and that they have addicted themselves to the ministry of the saints,)
(1 Cor. 16:1,3‑4,15)
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Gal. 2:10• 10Only they would that we should remember the poor; the same which I also was forward to do. (Gal. 2:10)
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Gal. 6:10• 10As we have therefore opportunity, let us do good unto all men, especially unto them who are of the household of faith. (Gal. 6:10)
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1 Tim. 5:10• 10Well reported of for good works; if she have brought up children, if she have lodged strangers, if she have washed the saints' feet, if she have relieved the afflicted, if she have diligently followed every good work. (1 Tim. 5:10)
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Philem. 5‑6• 5Hearing of thy love and faith, which thou hast toward the Lord Jesus, and toward all saints;
6That the communication of thy faith may become effectual by the acknowledging of every good thing which is in you in Christ Jesus.
(Philem. 5‑6)
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Heb. 6:10• 10For God is not unrighteous to forget your work and labor of love, which ye have showed toward his name, in that ye have ministered to the saints, and do minister. (Heb. 6:10)
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1 John 3:16‑18• 16Hereby perceive we the love of God, because he laid down his life for us: and we ought to lay down our lives for the brethren.
17But whoso hath this world's good, and seeth his brother have need, and shutteth up his bowels of compassion from him, how dwelleth the love of God in him?
18My little children, let us not love in word, neither in tongue; but in deed and in truth.
(1 John 3:16‑18)
 The sense, which is, that the Macedonian saints might have the grace and fellowship of the service which was to be done the poor saints. (Notes on 2 Corinthians 8:1-8 by W. Kelly)
 Personal influence has no place; faith and love are called out actively; the cheering example of saints where such devotedness could have been least expected opens the way; and Christ is brought in, carrying it home with irresistible power for those that know Him. (article #681080)

J. N. Darby Translation

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begging of us with much entreaty to give effect to the gracei and fellowship of the service which was to be rendered to the saints.

JND Translation Notes

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i
The "grace" here is not the collection, but the grace and favour shown to the poor in the gift. Instead of Paul having to press this grace on the Macedonians, they beg of him the grace and fellowship (koinonia) of the administration; that is, to be the instrument (though an apostle) of its manifestation by them. The "grace and fellowship" is the active exercise of grace towards the Jewish saints. This they begged of Paul. (See ver. 19.)

W. Kelly Translation

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aasking of us with much entreaty the grace and the fellowship of the ministering unto the saints;

WK Translation Notes

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a
[whole verse]: [See note to 2 Cor. 8:4]
entreaty ^: (The addition of δέξασθαι ἠμᾶς in Text.Rec. is supported by some cursives and versions, against the great mass of good authority.)... It will be noticed that the Authorized Version, following the common Greek text, contains the words, "that we would receive" (δέξασθαι ἠμᾶς), which again involves the insertion of "take upon us" in verse 4. But as the former is not warranted by the best authorities, so the latter is needless and indeed worse; for both additions enfeeble and falsify the sense. (Even so difficulty has been felt because of the absence of the finite verb expressed; but it seems plain enough, as Bengel long ago suggested, that ἔδωκαν which follows in verse 5, is understood in the earliest clause, and this removes all appearance of what has been styled "a sentence entirely shattered in passing through the apostle's mind." But it is no less plain that Bengel was mistaken in supposing that χάριν and κοιν. depend on ἔδωκαν, for they are unequivocally objects of δεόμενοι, which also takes a genitive of the person.) (Notes on 2 Cor., p.157,160)