Luke 6:35 KJV (With Strong’s)

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35
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ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
But
plen (Greek #4133)
moreover (besides), i.e. albeit, save that, rather, yet
KJV usage: but (rather), except, nevertheless, notwithstanding, save, than.
Pronounce: plane
Origin: from 4119
love ye
agapao (Greek #25)
to love (in a social or moral sense)
KJV usage: (be-)love(-ed). Compare 5368.
Pronounce: ag-ap-ah'-o
Origin: perhaps from ἄγαν (much) (or compare 5689)
your
humon (Greek #5216)
of (from or concerning) you
KJV usage: ye, you, your (own, -selves).
Pronounce: hoo-mone'
Origin: genitive case of 5210
enemies
echthros (Greek #2190)
hateful (passively, odious, or actively, hostile); usually as a noun, an adversary (especially Satan)
KJV usage: enemy, foe.
Pronounce: ech-thros'
Origin: from a primary ἔχθω (to hate)
u, and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
do good
agathopoieo (Greek #15)
to be a well-doer (as a favor or a duty)
KJV usage: (when) do good (well).
Pronounce: ag-ath-op-oy-eh'-o
Origin: from 17
, and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
lend
daneizo (Greek #1155)
to loan on interest; reflexively, to borrow
KJV usage: borrow, lend.
Pronounce: dan-ide'-zo
Origin: from 1156
v, hoping for
apelpizo (Greek #560)
to hope out, i.e. fully expect
KJV usage: hope for again.
Pronounce: ap-el-pid'-zo
Origin: from 575 and 1679
nothing
medeis (Greek #3367)
not even one (man, woman, thing)
KJV usage: any (man, thing), no (man), none, not (at all, any man, a whit), nothing, + without delay.
Pronounce: may-dice'
Origin: μηδεμία (may-dem-ee'-ah), and the neuter μηδέν (may-den') from 3361 and 1520
again
apelpizo (Greek #560)
to hope out, i.e. fully expect
KJV usage: hope for again.
Pronounce: ap-el-pid'-zo
Origin: from 575 and 1679
; and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
your
humon (Greek #5216)
of (from or concerning) you
KJV usage: ye, you, your (own, -selves).
Pronounce: hoo-mone'
Origin: genitive case of 5210
reward
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
misthos (Greek #3408)
pay for service (literally or figuratively), good or bad
KJV usage: hire, reward, wages.
Pronounce: mis-thos'
Origin: apparently a primary word
shall be
esomai (Greek #2071)
will be
KJV usage: shall (should) be (have), (shall) come (to pass), X may have, X fall, what would follow, X live long, X sojourn.
Pronounce: es'-om-ahee
Origin: future of 1510
great
polus (Greek #4183)
(singular) much (in any respect) or (plural) many; neuter (singular) as adverbial, largely; neuter (plural) as adverb or noun often, mostly, largely
KJV usage: abundant, + altogether, common, + far (passed, spent), (+ be of a) great (age, deal, -ly, while), long, many, much, oft(-en (-times)), plenteous, sore, straitly. Compare 4118, 4119.
Pronounce: pol-oos'
Origin: including the forms from the alternate πολλός
, and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
x ye shall be
esomai (Greek #2071)
will be
KJV usage: shall (should) be (have), (shall) come (to pass), X may have, X fall, what would follow, X live long, X sojourn.
Pronounce: es'-om-ahee
Origin: future of 1510
the children
huios (Greek #5207)
a "son" (sometimes of animals), used very widely of immediate, remote or figuratively, kinship
KJV usage: child, foal, son.
Pronounce: hwee-os'
Origin: apparently a primary word
of the Highest
hupsistos (Greek #5310)
highest, i.e. (masculine singular) the Supreme (God), or (neuter plural) the heavens
KJV usage: most high, highest.
Pronounce: hoop'-sis-tos
Origin: superlative from the base of 5311
: for
hoti (Greek #3754)
demonstrative, that (sometimes redundant); causative, because
KJV usage: as concerning that, as though, because (that), for (that), how (that), (in) that, though, why.
Pronounce: hot'-ee
Origin: neuter of 3748 as conjunction
he
autos (Greek #846)
the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the comparative 1438) of the third person , and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons
KJV usage: her, it(-self), one, the other, (mine) own, said, (self-), the) same, ((him-, my-, thy- )self, (your-)selves, she, that, their(-s), them(-selves), there(-at, - by, -in, -into, -of, -on, -with), they, (these) things, this (man), those, together, very, which. Compare 848.
Pronounce: ow-tos'
Origin: from the particle αὖ (perhaps akin to the base of 109 through the idea of a baffling wind) (backward)
is
esti (Greek #2076)
he (she or it) is; also (with neuter plural) they are
KJV usage: are, be(-long), call, X can(-not), come, consisteth, X dure for a while, + follow, X have, (that) is (to say), make, meaneth, X must needs, + profit, + remaineth, + wrestle.
Pronounce: es-tee'
Origin: third person singular present indicative of 1510
kind
chrestos (Greek #5543)
employed, i.e. (by implication) useful (in manner or morals)
KJV usage: better, easy, good(-ness), gracious, kind.
Pronounce: khrase-tos'
Origin: from 5530
unto
epi (Greek #1909)
properly, meaning superimposition (of time, place, order, etc.), as a relation of distribution (with the genitive case), i.e. over, upon, etc.; of rest (with the dative case) at, on, etc.; of direction (with the accusative case) towards, upon, etc.
KJV usage: about (the times), above, after, against, among, as long as (touching), at, beside, X have charge of, (be-, (where-))fore, in (a place, as much as, the time of, -to), (because) of, (up-)on (behalf of), over, (by, for) the space of, through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), with. In compounds it retains essentially the same import, at, upon, etc. (literally or figuratively).
Pronounce: ep-ee'
Origin: a primary preposition
the unthankful
acharistos (Greek #884)
thankless, i.e. ungrateful
KJV usage: unthankful.
Pronounce: ach-ar'-is-tos
Origin: from 1 (as a negative particle) and a presumed derivative of 5483
and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
to the evil
poneros (Greek #4190)
hurtful, i.e. evil (properly, in effect or influence, and thus differing from 2556, which refers rather to essential character, as well as from 4550, which indicates degeneracy from original virtue); figuratively, calamitous; also (passively) ill, i.e. diseased; but especially (morally) culpable, i.e. derelict, vicious, facinorous; neuter (singular) mischief, malice, or (plural) guilt; masculine (singular) the devil, or (plural) sinners
KJV usage: bad, evil, grievous, harm, lewd, malicious, wicked(-ness). See also 4191.
Pronounce: pon-ay-ros'
Origin: from a derivative of 4192
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More on:

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Cross References

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love.
Luke 6:27‑31• 27But I say unto you which hear, Love your enemies, do good to them which hate you,
28Bless them that curse you, and pray for them which despitefully use you.
29And unto him that smiteth thee on the one cheek offer also the other; and him that taketh away thy cloke forbid not to take thy coat also.
30Give to every man that asketh of thee; and of him that taketh away thy goods ask them not again.
31And as ye would that men should do to you, do ye also to them likewise.
(Luke 6:27‑31)
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Lev. 25:35‑37• 35And if thy brother be waxen poor, and fallen in decay with thee; then thou shalt relieve him: yea, though he be a stranger, or a sojourner; that he may live with thee.
36Take thou no usury of him, or increase: but fear thy God; that thy brother may live with thee.
37Thou shalt not give him thy money upon usury, nor lend him thy victuals for increase.
(Lev. 25:35‑37)
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Psa. 37:26• 26He is ever merciful, and lendeth; and his seed is blessed. (Psa. 37:26)
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Psa. 112:5• 5A good man showeth favor, and lendeth: he will guide his affairs with discretion. (Psa. 112:5)
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Prov. 19:17• 17He that hath pity upon the poor lendeth unto the Lord; and that which he hath given will he pay him again. (Prov. 19:17)
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Prov. 22:9• 9He that hath a bountiful eye shall be blessed; for he giveth of his bread to the poor. (Prov. 22:9)
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Rom. 5:8‑10• 8But God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.
9Much more then, being now justified by his blood, we shall be saved from wrath through him.
10For if, when we were enemies, we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son, much more, being reconciled, we shall be saved by his life.
(Rom. 5:8‑10)
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2 Cor. 8:9• 9For ye know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that, though he was rich, yet for your sakes he became poor, that ye through his poverty might be rich. (2 Cor. 8:9)
and ye.
Matt. 5:44‑45• 44But I say unto you, Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them which despitefully use you, and persecute you;
45That ye may be the children of your Father which is in heaven: for he maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust.
(Matt. 5:44‑45)
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John 13:35• 35By this shall all men know that ye are my disciples, if ye have love one to another. (John 13:35)
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John 15:8• 8Herein is my Father glorified, that ye bear much fruit; so shall ye be my disciples. (John 15:8)
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1 John 3:10‑14• 10In this the children of God are manifest, and the children of the devil: whosoever doeth not righteousness is not of God, neither he that loveth not his brother.
11For this is the message that ye heard from the beginning, that we should love one another.
12Not as Cain, who was of that wicked one, and slew his brother. And wherefore slew he him? Because his own works were evil, and his brother's righteous.
13Marvel not, my brethren, if the world hate you.
14We know that we have passed from death unto life, because we love the brethren. He that loveth not his brother abideth in death.
(1 John 3:10‑14)
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1 John 4:7‑11• 7Beloved, let us love one another: for love is of God; and every one that loveth is born of God, and knoweth God.
8He that loveth not knoweth not God; for God is love.
9In this was manifested the love of God toward us, because that God sent his only begotten Son into the world, that we might live through him.
10Herein is love, not that we loved God, but that he loved us, and sent his Son to be the propitiation for our sins.
11Beloved, if God so loved us, we ought also to love one another.
(1 John 4:7‑11)
for.

J. N. Darby Translation

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35
But love your enemies, and do good, and lend, hoping for nothing in return, and your reward shall be great, and ye shall be sons of the Highest; for *he* is good to the unthankful and wicked.

W. Kelly Translation

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35
But love your enemies, and do good and lend, hoping for nothing in returna; and your reward shall be great, and ye shall be sons of [the] Highest; for he is good to the unthankful and wicked1.

WK Translation Notes

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a
"hoping for nothing (meden) in return": This is the reading of some MSS. Others adopted (medemia) "despairing of no man," and still others "do not cease hope of men." We cannot reason on the use of the word (apelpizo) ’hope again’ elsewhere in the N.T., for this is its only occurrence. Considering the immediately preceding verse: what can be simpler than the converse call of grace, love, do good, lend, "hoping for nothing again"?

Full Notes

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1
hoping: Verse 35 is the most remarkable innovation, as far as translation is concerned, which as yet occurs in the Revision [of 1881]. "But love your enemies... and lend, never despairing," with the still stranger marginal alternation, "despairing of no man," μηδὲν (or, -α) ἀπελπίζοντες. The Authorized Version is "hoping for nothing again." Now we cannot reason on the usage of the word elsewhere in the New Testament, for this is its only occurrence. What influenced the Revisers is the fact that the word occurs in Polybius and the like in the sense of despairing or giving up in despair, and in the Authol P. ii. 114 of driving to despair. But even Liddell and Scott furnish, from Diog. L. i. 1-59, an instance of the modification, hoping that a thing will not happen. The fact is, that words thus compounded admit of meanings so widely different as to include senses nearly opposed. Thus ἁπάγειν means to take away, or to bring home; ἁπαλλάσσειν to release, to destroy, to escape; ἀπαυρᾶν to take away from, or receive; ἀπειπεῖν to speak out, deny, forbid, disown, or fail; ἀπελαύνειν to drive away, or to march; ἀπέρχεσθαι to go away, or to come back; ἀπεσθίειν to eat off or up, and to leave off eating; ἀπέχειν to keep off or hinder, or to receive in full; ἀποβαίνειν to throw away, and to throw back; ἀποβλέπειν to look on, or at, or away; αποδακρύειν to weep much, or to cease weeping; ἀποδαρθάνειν to sleep a little, or to wake up; ἀπόκειαθαι to be laid up in store, or aside; αποκλαίεσθαι to bewail oneself or to cease wailing, etc. This induction suffices to show that verbs compounded with ἀπό admit of flexibility enough in sense to cover the meaning attached to the word in our old and other Versions. The question then mainly turns on the requirement of the context. And when one weighs verses 30-34 with care, it seems surprising that a sense so unnatural here should be attached to the word in verse 35. Especially consider the immediately preceding verse: "and if ye lend to them of whom ye hope to receive, what thank have ye? even sinners lend to sinners, to receive again as much." What can be simpler than the converse call of grace, love, do good, lend, "hoping for nothing again." (Cf. Luke 14:12.) What worthy sense in such a connection is there in "never despairing"? Does it mean that, whatever we may give thus unselfishly in faith, we are to have no fears of coming short for ourselves? If so, it seems needless, mean, and out of character with all the rest. Never despair because of giving or lending to others! Even a generous man might be beyond such fears, not to speak of a son of the Highest exhorted by the Only-begotten of the Father. And what here is the force of the margin "despairing of no man"? If the Revisers understand despairing of no man’s honesty or gratitude in repayment, it seems quite contrary to the spirit of verse 30, not to mention that the sequel of verse 35 casts the believer wholly on God’s great recompense. (Bible Treasury 13:303)