Philem. 2 KJV (With Strong’s)

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2
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ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
And
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
to
agapetos (Greek #27)
beloved
KJV usage: (dearly, well) beloved, dear.
Pronounce: ag-ap-ay-tos'
Origin: from 25
our beloved
agapetos (Greek #27)
beloved
KJV usage: (dearly, well) beloved, dear.
Pronounce: ag-ap-ay-tos'
Origin: from 25
Apphia
Apphia (Greek #682)
Apphia, a woman of Collosae
KJV usage: Apphia.
Pronounce: ap-fee'-a
Origin: probably of foreign origin
, and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
Archippus
Archippos (Greek #751)
horse-ruler; Archippus, a Christian
KJV usage: Archippus.
Pronounce: ar'-khip-pos
Origin: from 746 and 2462
d our
hemon (Greek #2257)
of (or from) us
KJV usage: our (company), us, we.
Pronounce: hay-mone'
Origin: genitive case plural of 1473
fellowsoldier
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
sustratiotes (Greek #4961)
a co-campaigner, i.e. (figuratively) an associate in Christian toil
KJV usage: fellowsoldier.
Pronounce: soos-trat-ee-o'-tace
Origin: from 4862 and 4757
, and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
to the church
ekklesia (Greek #1577)
a calling out, i.e. (concretely) a popular meeting, especially a religious congregation (Jewish synagogue, or Christian community of members on earth or saints in heaven or both)
KJV usage: assembly, church.
Pronounce: ek-klay-see'-ah
Origin: from a compound of 1537 and a derivative of 2564
f in
kata (Greek #2596)
(prepositionally) down (in place or time), in varied relations (according to the case (genitive, dative or accusative) with which it is joined)
KJV usage: about, according as (to), after, against, (when they were) X alone, among, and, X apart, (even, like) as (concerning, pertaining to touching), X aside, at, before, beyond, by, to the charge of, (charita-)bly, concerning, + covered, (dai-)ly, down, every, (+ far more) exceeding, X more excellent, for, from ... to, godly, in(-asmuch, divers, every, -to, respect of), ... by, after the manner of, + by any means, beyond (out of) measure, X mightily, more, X natural, of (up-)on (X part), out (of every), over against, (+ your) X own, + particularly, so, through(-oughout, -oughout every), thus, (un-)to(-gether, -ward), X uttermost, where(-by), with. In composition it retains many of these applications, and frequently denotes opposition, distribution, or intensity.
Pronounce: kat-ah'
Origin: a primary particle
thy
sou (Greek #4675)
of thee, thy
KJV usage: X home, thee, thine (own), thou, thy.
Pronounce: soo
Origin: genitive case of 4771
house
oikos (Greek #3624)
a dwelling (more or less extensive, literal or figurative); by implication, a family (more or less related, literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: home, house(-hold), temple.
Pronounce: oy'-kos
Origin: of uncertain affinity
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Cross References

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Ministry on This Verse

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 To love and count on love is of faith, and prevails. But Philemon was not only an object of tender affection, but a "fellow-laborer," and the nature of the case made it expedient, unlike the usual character of apostolic addresses, to add the household. (Philemon by W. Kelly)
 The apostle brings in Archippus also, honored with the title of "our fellow-soldier." It is the same individual whom he exhorted at the close of Colossians to take heed to the ministry he had received in the Lord. Let him not forget to cast in whatever help he could render in this charge of grace. (Philemon by W. Kelly)
 Philemon, a rich man or at least one of easy fortune, received the assembly in his house (his wife being also converted), and in his measure labored himself in the Lord’s work. (PHILEMON by J.N. Darby)
 His appeal on behalf of Onesimus is to Philemon; but the whole assembly is to interest itself in this beloved slave, who was become a child of God. (PHILEMON by J.N. Darby)
 {v.1-2} Now the mention of all these names is expressive of fellowship, -those who had no natural fellowship one with the other, nothing in common one with the other, strangers in country, in habit, in language, had now by union with Jesus, common relationship, common affections, common service, common warfare. (Philemon by J.L. Harris)
 With what propriety therefore is the Church in the house mentioned here, as that which would lead Philemon immediately to see the blessedness of receiving Onesimus in brotherly love, and regarding him of the household of God, and therefore of the Church in his house. (Philemon by J.L. Harris)

J. N. Darby Translation

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and to the sister Apphia and to Archippus our fellow-soldier, and to the assembly which is in thine house.

W. Kelly Translation

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and to Apphia the sister, and to Archippus our fellow-soldier, and to the assembly in thy house1:

WK Translation Notes

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the sister: The reading of the Received Text ("the beloved" as in Tyndale, Crammer, and "our beloved" as in A.V.) rests on inferior witnesses. Wiclif and the English Version of Rheims follow the later copies of the Vulgate, which mix the wrong and the right ("most dere sister," "our deerest sister"). But ancient manuscripts, followed by such copies of the Vulgate as the Am. Tol. and Harl., give the true and only appropriate reading "the sister." (Exp. of Titus and Phile., p.143-4) [See also God’s Inspiration of the Scriptures, p. 518]
the sister: ἀγαπητῆ, "beloved," of the Text. Rec., followed by the Authorized Version, is properly excluded, and ἀδε, "sister," takes its place on ancient and ample authority. The internal superiority of the critical reading is obvious. (Bible Treasury 14:31)