Rom. 1:17 KJV (With Strong’s)

+
17
*
de (Greek #1161)
but, and, etc.
KJV usage: also, and, but, moreover, now (often unexpressed in English).
Pronounce: deh
Origin: a primary particle (adversative or continuative)
,*
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
For
gar (Greek #1063)
properly, assigning a reason (used in argument, explanation or intensification; often with other particles)
KJV usage: and, as, because (that), but, even, for, indeed, no doubt, seeing, then, therefore, verily, what, why, yet.
Pronounce: gar
Origin: a primary particle
therein
en (Greek #1722)
"in," at, (up-)on, by, etc.
KJV usage: about, after, against, + almost, X altogether, among, X as, at, before, between, (here-)by (+ all means), for (... sake of), + give self wholly to, (here-)in(-to, -wardly), X mightily, (because) of, (up-)on, (open-)ly, X outwardly, one, X quickly, X shortly, (speedi-)ly, X that, X there(-in, -on), through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), under, when, where(-with), while, with(-in). Often used in compounds, with substantially the same import; rarely with verbs of motion, and then not to indicate direction, except (elliptically) by a separate (and different) preposition.
Pronounce: en
Origin: a primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), i.e. a relation of rest (intermediate between 1519 and 1537)
d *
autos (Greek #846)
the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the comparative 1438) of the third person , and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons
KJV usage: her, it(-self), one, the other, (mine) own, said, (self-), the) same, ((him-, my-, thy- )self, (your-)selves, she, that, their(-s), them(-selves), there(-at, - by, -in, -into, -of, -on, -with), they, (these) things, this (man), those, together, very, which. Compare 848.
Pronounce: ow-tos'
Origin: from the particle αὖ (perhaps akin to the base of 109 through the idea of a baffling wind) (backward)
is
apokalupto (Greek #601)
to take off the cover, i.e. disclose
KJV usage: reveal.
Pronounce: ap-ok-al-oop'-to
Origin: from 575 and 2572
the righteousness
dikaiosune (Greek #1343)
equity (of character or act); specially (Christian) justification
KJV usage: righteousness.
Pronounce: dik-ah-yos-oo'-nay
Origin: from 1342
of God
theos (Greek #2316)
a deity, especially (with 3588) the supreme Divinity; figuratively, a magistrate; by Hebraism, very
KJV usage: X exceeding, God, god(-ly, -ward).
Pronounce: theh'-os
Origin: of uncertain affinity
revealed
apokalupto (Greek #601)
to take off the cover, i.e. disclose
KJV usage: reveal.
Pronounce: ap-ok-al-oop'-to
Origin: from 575 and 2572
from
ek (Greek #1537)
or ἐξ (ex) a primary preposition denoting origin (the point whence action or motion proceeds), from, out (of place, time, or cause; literal or figurative; direct or remote)
KJV usage: after, among, X are, at, betwixt(-yond), by (the means of), exceedingly, (+ abundantly above), for(- th), from (among, forth, up), + grudgingly, + heartily, X heavenly, X hereby, + very highly, in, ...ly, (because, by reason) of, off (from), on, out among (from, of), over, since, X thenceforth, through, X unto, X vehemently, with(-out). Often used in composition, with the same general import; often of completion.
Pronounce: ek
faith
pistis (Greek #4102)
persuasion, i.e. credence; moral conviction (of religious truth, or the truthfulness of God or a religious teacher), especially reliance upon Christ for salvation; abstractly, constancy in such profession; by extension, the system of religious (Gospel) truth itself
KJV usage: assurance, belief, believe, faith, fidelity.
Pronounce: pis'-tis
Origin: from 3982
to
eis (Greek #1519)
to or into (indicating the point reached or entered), of place, time, or (figuratively) purpose (result, etc.); also in adverbial phrases
KJV usage: (abundant-)ly, against, among, as, at, (back-)ward, before, by, concerning, + continual, + far more exceeding, for (intent, purpose), fore, + forth, in (among, at, unto, -so much that, -to), to the intent that, + of one mind, + never, of, (up-)on, + perish, + set at one again, (so) that, therefore(-unto), throughout, til, to (be, the end, -ward), (here-)until(-to), ...ward, (where-)fore, with. Often used in composition with the same general import, but only with verbs (etc.) expressing motion (literally or figuratively).
Pronounce: ice
Origin: a primary preposition
faith
pistis (Greek #4102)
persuasion, i.e. credence; moral conviction (of religious truth, or the truthfulness of God or a religious teacher), especially reliance upon Christ for salvation; abstractly, constancy in such profession; by extension, the system of religious (Gospel) truth itself
KJV usage: assurance, belief, believe, faith, fidelity.
Pronounce: pis'-tis
Origin: from 3982
: as
kathos (Greek #2531)
just (or inasmuch) as, that
KJV usage: according to, (according, even) as, how, when.
Pronounce: kath-oce'
Origin: from 2596 and 5613
it is written
grapho (Greek #1125)
to "grave", especially to write; figuratively, to describe
KJV usage: describe, write(-ing, -ten).
Pronounce: graf'-o
Origin: a primary verb
e, The just
dikaios (Greek #1342)
equitable (in character or act); by implication, innocent, holy (absolutely or relatively)
KJV usage: just, meet, right(-eous).
Pronounce: dik'-ah-yos
Origin: from 1349
shall live
zao (Greek #2198)
to live (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: life(-time), (a-)live(-ly), quick.
Pronounce: dzah'-o
Origin: a primary verb
by
ek (Greek #1537)
or ἐξ (ex) a primary preposition denoting origin (the point whence action or motion proceeds), from, out (of place, time, or cause; literal or figurative; direct or remote)
KJV usage: after, among, X are, at, betwixt(-yond), by (the means of), exceedingly, (+ abundantly above), for(- th), from (among, forth, up), + grudgingly, + heartily, X heavenly, X hereby, + very highly, in, ...ly, (because, by reason) of, off (from), on, out among (from, of), over, since, X thenceforth, through, X unto, X vehemently, with(-out). Often used in composition, with the same general import; often of completion.
Pronounce: ek
faith
pistis (Greek #4102)
persuasion, i.e. credence; moral conviction (of religious truth, or the truthfulness of God or a religious teacher), especially reliance upon Christ for salvation; abstractly, constancy in such profession; by extension, the system of religious (Gospel) truth itself
KJV usage: assurance, belief, believe, faith, fidelity.
Pronounce: pis'-tis
Origin: from 3982
.

More on:

+

Cross References

+

Ministry on This Verse

+
 Salvation…. it was the believer who shared it, but to have part in it by faith was exactly the way to share it without adding anything whatsoever to it, and to leave it wholly the salvation of God. (Romans 1:1-17 by J.N. Darby)
 This righteousness is on the principle of faith. It is revealed, and consequently to faith, wherever that faith exists. This is the force of the expression which is translated “from faith to faith”-on the principle of faith unto faith. (Romans 1:1-17 by J.N. Darby)
 The primary subject was the Person of Christ, Son of David according to flesh (accomplishment of promise); and the Son of God with power according to the Spirit of holiness. But the righteousness of God (not of man) was revealed in it. This is the grand theme of all that follows. The Apostle had indeed reason not to be ashamed of it, despised as it was by men. (Romans 1:1-17 by J.N. Darby)
 The thesis of the epistle then is in verse 17, that which proved its need in verse 18. (Romans 1:18-3:20 by J.N. Darby)
 {righteousness of God} If God acted according to His heart of love and brought men into blessing without dealing with their sins, He would cease to be holy and just. On the other hand, if God acted according to His holy nature and judged men according to the claims of divine justice, all men would be justly sent to hell, and none would be saved-and the love of God would remain unknown. How then can God save men and still remain just? This is what the gospel announces. (Opening Salutations by B. Anstey)

J. N. Darby Translation

+
17
for righteousness of Godd is revealed therein, on the principle of faith, to faith: according as it is written, But the just shall live bye faith.

JND Translation Notes

+
d
"Righteousness of God." The absence of the article may arrest the mind here, and in some other places, in this part of the epistle. It is likely to do so, because the righteousness of God is now a known doctrine; not so when the apostle taught. The righteousness of God was a wholly new thought, as was indeed wrath from heaven. wrath on earth was not. The gospel, or "glad tidings," was the power of God to salvation, because righteousness of God (that kind of righteousness) was revealed -- not a righteousness required of man. See ch. 3.21.
e
"By faith." The word "by" is the same in Greek (ek) as that translated "on the principle of." I have left "by" as being a quotation from Hab. 2.4.

W. Kelly Translation

+
17
For God’s righteousness in it is revealed by faith unto faith, even as it is written, "But the righteous shall live by faith1."

WK Translation Notes

+
1
righteousness: The first thing to be remarked is that δικαιοσύνη does not mean justification, but here at least, as in most passages where this phrase occurs, righteousness, and this justifying. It is therefore kept distinct by the apostle from δικαίωσις (chap. 4:25; 5:18), which expresses the act of justifying, or the effect justification; as δικαίωμα sets forth accomplished righteousness in justification or in judgment, righteous requirement whether morally or as an ordinance or decree. (Luke 1:6; Rom. 1:32; 2:26; 5:16, 18; 8:4; Heb. 9:1, 10; Rev. 15:4; 19:8.) Thus δικαιοσύνη retains its regular signification of habit or quality of righteousness. (Bible Treasury 6:229, Notes on Romans, p.11)
righteousness: It is a singular fact that, while God used Rom. 1:17 to Luther’s conversion, and we may say to the Reformation, neither he nor his companions, or their followers, ever apprehended the full truth conveyed by this blessed expression "righteousness of God." Hence it is habitually mistranslated in Luther’s German Bible, where δικαιοςύνη θεοῦ is rendered "the righteousness which is available before God." This, evidently, is far short of the truth; for a legal righteousness, if accomplished by man, would have availed before God. But God, in His grace, has accomplished in Christ and given an incomparably higher, i.e., a divine, righteousness, and nothing less than this are we made in Christ. Perhaps the imperfect view entertained by the great German Reformer may account in large measure for the fluctuations in his enjoyment of peace. The same thing applies to most Protestants up to our day, even where they are devoted Christians, and perhaps from a similar cause; for they have advanced little, if at all, beyond the light on this head possessed by Luther. (Bible Treasury 1:196-7)
^ righteousness: one doubts the need of saying either "a" righteousness or "the" wrath, the phrases being alike characteristic. (Bible Treasury 13:348)
revealed: Again, the reader must beware of the notion which some found on the present tense of the verb ἀποκαλύπτεται, as if it warrants the idea of a gradually more complete realization of the state of justification. (Calvin may illustrate the danger of this; for he draws from it, that as our faith makes progress and advances in this knowledge, so the righteousness of God increases in us at the same time. What can be looser than such language?) I do not doubt that faith grows and so apprehension and enjoyment of our blessing in Christ, but the thing revealed in the gospel to faith is complete: divine righteousness repudiates any other thought, whatever may be the measure in which the heart apprehends it. (Bible Treasury 6:231, Notes on Romans, p.16)
by: It is singular that the Authorized Version should give "from faith" here and "by faith" for the same phrase in the same verse. The former appears to me objectionable in this connection; because it insinuates the idea of growth from one degree of faith to another, as some ancients and moderns have avowed. On the other hand, to take ἐκ π. (by faith) with δ.θ. (God’s righteousness) is due perhaps to the difficulty some have found in assigning to each phrase its own definite value. (Bible Treasury 6:231, Notes on Romans, p.16)
by: "from" faith is here objectionable, as leading the reader naturally to the error of conceiving from one degree of faith to another, from less to more. This is not at all the thought any more than "by" in the Revised Version, which makes no just sense with "is being revealed." Hence the Revisers separated it from ἀπ., its true connection, to "righteousness," which alters the truth and mars it. In the gospel God’s righteousness is revealed by faith unto faith in the gospel. (Bible Treasury 14:351)