1 Cor. 14:33 KJV (With Strong’s)

+
33
*
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
For
gar (Greek #1063)
properly, assigning a reason (used in argument, explanation or intensification; often with other particles)
KJV usage: and, as, because (that), but, even, for, indeed, no doubt, seeing, then, therefore, verily, what, why, yet.
Pronounce: gar
Origin: a primary particle
God
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
theos (Greek #2316)
a deity, especially (with 3588) the supreme Divinity; figuratively, a magistrate; by Hebraism, very
KJV usage: X exceeding, God, god(-ly, -ward).
Pronounce: theh'-os
Origin: of uncertain affinity
is
esti (Greek #2076)
he (she or it) is; also (with neuter plural) they are
KJV usage: are, be(-long), call, X can(-not), come, consisteth, X dure for a while, + follow, X have, (that) is (to say), make, meaneth, X must needs, + profit, + remaineth, + wrestle.
Pronounce: es-tee'
Origin: third person singular present indicative of 1510
not
ou (Greek #3756)
the absolute negative (compare 3361) adverb; no or not
KJV usage: + long, nay, neither, never, no (X man), none, (can-)not, + nothing, + special, un(-worthy), when, + without, + yet but. See also 3364, 3372.
Pronounce: oo
Origin: οὐκ (ook), and (before an aspirate) οὐχ (ookh) a primary word
the author of δconfusion
akatastasia (Greek #181)
instability, i.e. disorder
KJV usage: commotion, confusion, tumult.
Pronounce: ak-at-as-tah-see'-ah
Origin: from 182
, but
alla (Greek #235)
properly, other things, i.e. (adverbially) contrariwise (in many relations)
KJV usage: and, but (even), howbeit, indeed, nay, nevertheless, no, notwithstanding, save, therefore, yea, yet.
Pronounce: al-lah'
Origin: neuter plural of 243
of peace
eirene (Greek #1515)
peace (literally or figuratively); by implication, prosperity
KJV usage: one, peace, quietness, rest, + set at one again.
Pronounce: i-ray'-nay
Origin: probably from a primary verb εἴρω (to join)
, as
hos (Greek #5613)
which how, i.e. in that manner (very variously used, as follows)
KJV usage: about, after (that), (according) as (it had been, it were), as soon (as), even as (like), for, how (greatly), like (as, unto), since, so (that), that, to wit, unto, when(-soever), while, X with all speed.
Pronounce: hoce
Origin: probably adverb of comparative from 3739
in
en (Greek #1722)
"in," at, (up-)on, by, etc.
KJV usage: about, after, against, + almost, X altogether, among, X as, at, before, between, (here-)by (+ all means), for (... sake of), + give self wholly to, (here-)in(-to, -wardly), X mightily, (because) of, (up-)on, (open-)ly, X outwardly, one, X quickly, X shortly, (speedi-)ly, X that, X there(-in, -on), through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), under, when, where(-with), while, with(-in). Often used in compounds, with substantially the same import; rarely with verbs of motion, and then not to indicate direction, except (elliptically) by a separate (and different) preposition.
Pronounce: en
Origin: a primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), i.e. a relation of rest (intermediate between 1519 and 1537)
f all
pas (Greek #3956)
apparently a primary word; all, any, every, the whole
KJV usage: all (manner of, means), alway(-s), any (one), X daily, + ever, every (one, way), as many as, + no(-thing), X thoroughly, whatsoever, whole, whosoever.
Pronounce: pas
Origin: including all the forms of declension
churches
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
ekklesia (Greek #1577)
a calling out, i.e. (concretely) a popular meeting, especially a religious congregation (Jewish synagogue, or Christian community of members on earth or saints in heaven or both)
KJV usage: assembly, church.
Pronounce: ek-klay-see'-ah
Origin: from a compound of 1537 and a derivative of 2564
of the saints
hagios (Greek #40)
sacred (physically, pure, morally blameless or religious, ceremonially, consecrated)
KJV usage: (most) holy (one, thing), saint.
Pronounce: hag'-ee-os
Origin: from ἅγος (an awful thing) (compare 53, 2282)
.

Cross References

+
confusion.
Gr. tumult, or unquietness.
but.
in.

J. N. Darby Translation

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33
For God is not a God of disorderb but of peace, as in all the assemblies of the saintsc.

JND Translation Notes

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b
Or "he is not the God of disorder."
c
Some connect this last phrase with what follows. The repetition of "assemblies" might seem harsh in that case. But ver. 36 would perhaps tend to the opposite conclusion. It is a question of interpretation, not of translation.

W. Kelly Translation

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33
aFor God is not [a God] of confusion, but of peace, as in all the assemblies of the saints.

WK Translation Notes

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a
[whole verse]: 33, 34 the order of the Authorized and Revised Versions seems far better than in Lachmann, Tischendorf, Meyer, etc., whom the Americans [correctors of the RV] follow. (Bible Treasury 14:368)
as in all assemblies of the saints: It is not quite certain whether we should connect the last clause with verse 33 as its close, or with verse 34 as its beginning. Many critics and commentators prefer the latter. There is no doubt that Lachmann was wrong in punctuating the Greek, so as to make "of the saints" the complement, not of the assemblies to which it unquestionably belongs, but of "the women," ὐμῶν being of course omitted on the authority of the three greatest uncials, six cursives, with most of the ancient versions and early citations. But safer editors, like Tischendorf, who also omit ὐμῶν, separate αἰ γυναῖκες, "the women," from τῶν ἀγίων, "of the saints." To begin with such a phrase is unexampled. (Notes on 1 Cor., p.241)