1 Cor. 15:32 KJV (With Strong’s)

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32
If
ei (Greek #1487)
if, whether, that, etc.
KJV usage: forasmuch as, if, that, (al-)though, whether. Often used in connection or composition with other particles, especially as in 1489, 1490, 1499, 1508, 1509, 1512, 1513, 1536, 1537. See also 1437.
Pronounce: i
Origin: a primary particle of conditionality
δafter the manner
kata (Greek #2596)
(prepositionally) down (in place or time), in varied relations (according to the case (genitive, dative or accusative) with which it is joined)
KJV usage: about, according as (to), after, against, (when they were) X alone, among, and, X apart, (even, like) as (concerning, pertaining to touching), X aside, at, before, beyond, by, to the charge of, (charita-)bly, concerning, + covered, (dai-)ly, down, every, (+ far more) exceeding, X more excellent, for, from ... to, godly, in(-asmuch, divers, every, -to, respect of), ... by, after the manner of, + by any means, beyond (out of) measure, X mightily, more, X natural, of (up-)on (X part), out (of every), over against, (+ your) X own, + particularly, so, through(-oughout, -oughout every), thus, (un-)to(-gether, -ward), X uttermost, where(-by), with. In composition it retains many of these applications, and frequently denotes opposition, distribution, or intensity.
Pronounce: kat-ah'
Origin: a primary particle
of men
anthropos (Greek #444)
man-faced, i.e. a human being
KJV usage: certain, man.
Pronounce: anth'-ro-pos
Origin: from 435 and ὤψ (the countenance; from 3700)
I have fought with beasts
theriomacheo (Greek #2341)
to be a beast-fighter (in the gladiatorial show), i.e. (figuratively) to encounter (furious men)
KJV usage: fight with wild beasts.
Pronounce: thay-ree-om-akh-eh'-o
Origin: from a compound of 2342 and 3164
at
en (Greek #1722)
"in," at, (up-)on, by, etc.
KJV usage: about, after, against, + almost, X altogether, among, X as, at, before, between, (here-)by (+ all means), for (... sake of), + give self wholly to, (here-)in(-to, -wardly), X mightily, (because) of, (up-)on, (open-)ly, X outwardly, one, X quickly, X shortly, (speedi-)ly, X that, X there(-in, -on), through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), under, when, where(-with), while, with(-in). Often used in compounds, with substantially the same import; rarely with verbs of motion, and then not to indicate direction, except (elliptically) by a separate (and different) preposition.
Pronounce: en
Origin: a primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), i.e. a relation of rest (intermediate between 1519 and 1537)
Ephesus
Ephesos (Greek #2181)
Ephesus, a city of Asia Minor
KJV usage: Ephesus.
Pronounce: ef'-es-os
Origin: probably of foreign origin
, what
tis (Greek #5101)
an interrogative pronoun, who, which or what (in direct or indirect questions)
KJV usage: every man, how (much), + no(-ne, thing), what (manner, thing), where (-by, -fore, -of, -unto, - with, -withal), whether, which, who(-m, -se), why.
Pronounce: tis
Origin: probably emphatic of 5100
advantageth it
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
ophelos (Greek #3786)
gain
KJV usage: advantageth, profit.
Pronounce: of'-el-os
Origin: from ὀφέλλω (to heap up, i.e. accumulate or benefit)
me
moi (Greek #3427)
to me
KJV usage: I, me, mine, my.
Pronounce: moy
Origin: the simpler form of 1698
, if
ei (Greek #1487)
if, whether, that, etc.
KJV usage: forasmuch as, if, that, (al-)though, whether. Often used in connection or composition with other particles, especially as in 1489, 1490, 1499, 1508, 1509, 1512, 1513, 1536, 1537. See also 1437.
Pronounce: i
Origin: a primary particle of conditionality
the dead
nekros (Greek #3498)
dead (literally or figuratively; also as noun)
KJV usage: dead.
Pronounce: nek-ros'
Origin: from an apparently primary νέκυς (a corpse)
rise
egeiro (Greek #1453)
to waken (transitively or intransitively), i.e. rouse (literally, from sleep, from sitting or lying, from disease, from death; or figuratively, from obscurity, inactivity, ruins, nonexistence)
KJV usage: awake, lift (up), raise (again, up), rear up, (a-)rise (again, up), stand, take up.
Pronounce: eg-i'-ro
Origin: probably akin to the base of 58 (through the idea of collecting one's faculties)
not
ou (Greek #3756)
the absolute negative (compare 3361) adverb; no or not
KJV usage: + long, nay, neither, never, no (X man), none, (can-)not, + nothing, + special, un(-worthy), when, + without, + yet but. See also 3364, 3372.
Pronounce: oo
Origin: οὐκ (ook), and (before an aspirate) οὐχ (ookh) a primary word
? let usm eat
phago (Greek #5315)
to eat (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: eat, meat.
Pronounce: fag'-o
Origin: a primary verb (used as an alternate of 2068 in certain tenses)
and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
drink
pino (Greek #4095)
to imbibe (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: drink.
Pronounce: pee'-no
Origin: πίω (pee'-o), which (together with another form) πόω (po'-o) occurs only as an alternate in certain tenses
; for
gar (Greek #1063)
properly, assigning a reason (used in argument, explanation or intensification; often with other particles)
KJV usage: and, as, because (that), but, even, for, indeed, no doubt, seeing, then, therefore, verily, what, why, yet.
Pronounce: gar
Origin: a primary particle
to morrow
aurion (Greek #839)
properly, fresh, i.e. (adverb with ellipsis of 2250) to-morrow
KJV usage: (to-)morrow, next day.
Pronounce: ow'-ree-on
Origin: from a derivative of the same as 109 (meaning a breeze, i.e. the morning air)
we die
apothnesko (Greek #599)
to die off (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: be dead, death, die, lie a-dying, be slain (X with).
Pronounce: ap-oth-nace'-ko
Origin: from 575 and 2348
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More on:

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Cross References

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Ministry on This Verse

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after.
or, to speak after.
beast.
Ephesus.
Acts 19:1,23‑41• 1And it came to pass, that, while Apollos was at Corinth, Paul having passed through the upper coasts came to Ephesus: and finding certain disciples,
23And the same time there arose no small stir about that way.
24For a certain man named Demetrius, a silversmith, which made silver shrines for Diana, brought no small gain unto the craftsmen;
25Whom he called together with the workmen of like occupation, and said, Sirs, ye know that by this craft we have our wealth.
26Moreover ye see and hear, that not alone at Ephesus, but almost throughout all Asia, this Paul hath persuaded and turned away much people, saying that they be no gods, which are made with hands:
27So that not only this our craft is in danger to be set at nought; but also that the temple of the great goddess Diana should be despised, and her magnificence should be destroyed, whom all Asia and the world worshippeth.
28And when they heard these sayings, they were full of wrath, and cried out, saying, Great is Diana of the Ephesians.
29And the whole city was filled with confusion: and having caught Gaius and Aristarchus, men of Macedonia, Paul's companions in travel, they rushed with one accord into the theatre.
30And when Paul would have entered in unto the people, the disciples suffered him not.
31And certain of the chief of Asia, which were his friends, sent unto him, desiring him that he would not adventure himself into the theatre.
32Some therefore cried one thing, and some another: for the assembly was confused; and the more part knew not wherefore they were come together.
33And they drew Alexander out of the multitude, the Jews putting him forward. And Alexander beckoned with the hand, and would have made his defence unto the people.
34But when they knew that he was a Jew, all with one voice about the space of two hours cried out, Great is Diana of the Ephesians.
35And when the townclerk had appeased the people, he said, Ye men of Ephesus, what man is there that knoweth not how that the city of the Ephesians is a worshipper of the great goddess Diana, and of the image which fell down from Jupiter?
36Seeing then that these things cannot be spoken against, ye ought to be quiet, and to do nothing rashly.
37For ye have brought hither these men, which are neither robbers of churches, nor yet blasphemers of your goddess.
38Wherefore if Demetrius, and the craftsmen which are with him, have a matter against any man, the law is open, and there are deputies: let them implead one another.
39But if ye inquire any thing concerning other matters, it shall be determined in a lawful assembly.
40For we are in danger to be called in question for this day's uproar, there being no cause whereby we may give an account of this concourse.
41And when he had thus spoken, he dismissed the assembly.
(Acts 19:1,23‑41)
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2 Cor. 1:8‑10• 8For we would not, brethren, have you ignorant of our trouble which came to us in Asia, that we were pressed out of measure, above strength, insomuch that we despaired even of life:
9But we had the sentence of death in ourselves, that we should not trust in ourselves, but in God which raiseth the dead:
10Who delivered us from so great a death, and doth deliver: in whom we trust that he will yet deliver us;
(2 Cor. 1:8‑10)
what.
let.
 Here again it was resurrection which cheered him in the fierce conflict, which, speaking as men do, he calls a fight with beasts. It is no uncommon figure. Compare Titus 1:12 Tim. 4:17….Is it not more purifying to think of the soul apart from the body, and in heavenly glory? Not so; it is the hope of the body rising which encourages us to deny self, and mortify our members here below. See the place given to the body in Rom. 6; 12, as well as in the Epistles to the Corinthians, and elsewhere. Now is the time, here the place, to walk as dead with Christ, and alive in Him to God. In glory we shall dwell at ease, our bodies changed into the likeness of His glorious body. (Notes on 1 Corinthians 15:29-34 by W. Kelly)
 I do not think that verse 32 should be taken literally. The word translated “I have fought with beasts” is usually employed in a figurative sense, to be in conflict with fierce and implacable enemies. In consequence of the violence of the Ephesians he had nearly lost his life, and even despaired of saving it; but God had delivered him. (1 Corinthians 15 by J.N. Darby)
 Here again it was resurrection which cheered him in the fierce conflict, which, speaking as men do, he calls a fight with beasts. It is no uncommon figure. Compare Titus 1:12; 2 Tim. 4:17. (Notes on 1 Corinthians 15:29-34 by W. Kelly)

J. N. Darby Translation

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32
If, to speak after the manner of man, I have fought with beastsg in Ephesus, what is the profit to me if those that are dead do not rise? let us eat and drink; for to-morrow we dieh.

JND Translation Notes

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g
The expression "fought with beasts" is used figuratively as well as literally.
h
See Isa. 22.13.

W. Kelly Translation

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32
If after man I fought with beasts in Ephesus, what [is] the profit to me? If no dead rise, let us eat and drink, for tomorrow we die.