1 John 2:13 KJV (With Strong’s)

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13
I write
grapho (Greek #1125)
to "grave", especially to write; figuratively, to describe
KJV usage: describe, write(-ing, -ten).
Pronounce: graf'-o
Origin: a primary verb
unto you
humin (Greek #5213)
to (with or by) you
KJV usage: ye, you, your(-selves).
Pronounce: hoo-min'
Origin: irregular dative case of 5210
, fathers
pater (Greek #3962)
a "father" (literally or figuratively, near or more remote)
KJV usage: father, parent.
Pronounce: pat-ayr'
Origin: apparently a primary word
, because
hoti (Greek #3754)
demonstrative, that (sometimes redundant); causative, because
KJV usage: as concerning that, as though, because (that), for (that), how (that), (in) that, though, why.
Pronounce: hot'-ee
Origin: neuter of 3748 as conjunction
ye have known
ginosko (Greek #1097)
to "know" (absolutely) in a great variety of applications and with many implications (as follow, with others not thus clearly expressed)
KJV usage: allow, be aware (of), feel, (have) know(-ledge), perceived, be resolved, can speak, be sure, understand.
Pronounce: ghin-oce'-ko
Origin: a prolonged form of a primary verb
himb that is from
apo (Greek #575)
"off," i.e. away (from something near), in various senses (of place, time, or relation; literal or figurative)
KJV usage: (X here-)after, ago, at, because of, before, by (the space of), for(-th), from, in, (out) of, off, (up-)on(-ce), since, with. In composition (as a prefix) it usually denotes separation, departure, cessation, completion, reversal, etc.
Pronounce: apo'
Origin: a primary particle
the beginning
arche (Greek #746)
(properly abstract) a commencement, or (concretely) chief (in various applications of order, time, place, or rank)
KJV usage: beginning, corner, (at the, the) first (estate), magistrate, power, principality, principle, rule.
Pronounce: ar-khay'
Origin: from 756
. I write
grapho (Greek #1125)
to "grave", especially to write; figuratively, to describe
KJV usage: describe, write(-ing, -ten).
Pronounce: graf'-o
Origin: a primary verb
unto you
humin (Greek #5213)
to (with or by) you
KJV usage: ye, you, your(-selves).
Pronounce: hoo-min'
Origin: irregular dative case of 5210
, young men
neaniskos (Greek #3495)
a youth (under forty)
KJV usage: young man.
Pronounce: neh-an-is'-kos
Origin: from the same as 3494
, because
hoti (Greek #3754)
demonstrative, that (sometimes redundant); causative, because
KJV usage: as concerning that, as though, because (that), for (that), how (that), (in) that, though, why.
Pronounce: hot'-ee
Origin: neuter of 3748 as conjunction
ye have overcome
nikao (Greek #3528)
to subdue (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: conquer, overcome, prevail, get the victory.
Pronounce: nik-ah'-o
Origin: from 3529
the wicked one
poneros (Greek #4190)
hurtful, i.e. evil (properly, in effect or influence, and thus differing from 2556, which refers rather to essential character, as well as from 4550, which indicates degeneracy from original virtue); figuratively, calamitous; also (passively) ill, i.e. diseased; but especially (morally) culpable, i.e. derelict, vicious, facinorous; neuter (singular) mischief, malice, or (plural) guilt; masculine (singular) the devil, or (plural) sinners
KJV usage: bad, evil, grievous, harm, lewd, malicious, wicked(-ness). See also 4191.
Pronounce: pon-ay-ros'
Origin: from a derivative of 4192
. I write
grapho (Greek #1125)
to "grave", especially to write; figuratively, to describe
KJV usage: describe, write(-ing, -ten).
Pronounce: graf'-o
Origin: a primary verb
unto you
humin (Greek #5213)
to (with or by) you
KJV usage: ye, you, your(-selves).
Pronounce: hoo-min'
Origin: irregular dative case of 5210
, little children
paidion (Greek #3813)
a childling (of either sex), i.e. (properly), an infant, or (by extension) a half-grown boy or girl; figuratively, an immature Christian
KJV usage: (little, young) child, damsel.
Pronounce: pahee-dee'-on
Origin: neuter diminutive of 3816
, because
hoti (Greek #3754)
demonstrative, that (sometimes redundant); causative, because
KJV usage: as concerning that, as though, because (that), for (that), how (that), (in) that, though, why.
Pronounce: hot'-ee
Origin: neuter of 3748 as conjunction
ye have known
ginosko (Greek #1097)
to "know" (absolutely) in a great variety of applications and with many implications (as follow, with others not thus clearly expressed)
KJV usage: allow, be aware (of), feel, (have) know(-ledge), perceived, be resolved, can speak, be sure, understand.
Pronounce: ghin-oce'-ko
Origin: a prolonged form of a primary verb
the Father
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
pater (Greek #3962)
a "father" (literally or figuratively, near or more remote)
KJV usage: father, parent.
Pronounce: pat-ayr'
Origin: apparently a primary word
.*
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
e

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Cross References

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fathers.
because.
him that.
young.
because.
the wicked.
little.
ye have known.
Matt. 11:27• 27All things are delivered unto me of my Father: and no man knoweth the Son, but the Father; neither knoweth any man the Father, save the Son, and he to whomsoever the Son will reveal him. (Matt. 11:27)
;
Luke 10:22• 22All things are delivered to me of my Father: and no man knoweth who the Son is, but the Father; and who the Father is, but the Son, and he to whom the Son will reveal him. (Luke 10:22)
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John 8:54‑55• 54Jesus answered, If I honor myself, my honor is nothing: it is my Father that honoreth me; of whom ye say, that he is your God:
55Yet ye have not known him; but I know him: and if I should say, I know him not, I shall be a liar like unto you: but I know him, and keep his saying.
(John 8:54‑55)
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John 14:7,9• 7If ye had known me, ye should have known my Father also: and from henceforth ye know him, and have seen him.
9Jesus saith unto him, Have I been so long time with you, and yet hast thou not known me, Philip? he that hath seen me hath seen the Father; and how sayest thou then, Show us the Father?
(John 14:7,9)
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John 16:3• 3And these things will they do unto you, because they have not known the Father, nor me. (John 16:3)
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John 17:21• 21That they all may be one; as thou, Father, art in me, and I in thee, that they also may be one in us: that the world may believe that thou hast sent me. (John 17:21)
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2 Cor. 4:6• 6For God, who commanded the light to shine out of darkness, hath shined in our hearts, to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ. (2 Cor. 4:6)

J. N. Darby Translation

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13
I write to you, fathers, because ye have knowne him that is from the beginning. I write to you, young men, because ye have overcomee the wicked one. I write to you, little childrenf, because ye have knowna the Father.

JND Translation Notes

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e
The perfect tense. the state produced continues.
f
Paidion (diminutive); it has reference to growth. It stands in contrast to "young men" and "fathers."
a
Ginosko. and so throughout chapter, except vers. 11,20,21,29 (first), oida. Perfect tense here. "have come to know him, and continue so to do"; and so vers. 4,13,14.

W. Kelly Translation

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13
aI write to you, fathers, because ye have known him [that is] from [the] beginning; I write to you, young men, because ye have overcome the wicked one; I write to you, little children, because ye have known the Father.

WK Translation Notes

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a
write: It is extraordinary that any Christian of the least intelligence should blunder, as Dean Alford did here. In the third edition of his last volume p. 440, he still talks of "three classes of readers, denoted the first time by τεκνία, πατέρες, ωεανίσκοι. and the second time by παιδία πατέρες." But this is mere oversight of the common portion of the τεκνία, followed by the three divisions into πατέρες, ωεανίσκοι παιδία which is repeated with greater detail (except for the πατέρες) in verses 14 to 17 for the ωεανίσκοι, and in verses 18 to 27 for the παιδία. Afterward τεκνία is the address to all from verse 28, as he addressed all in verse 12. What misled Alford was one of those mistakes (too often in the oldest uncials, א A B C L P, etc.) which give ἔγραψα in the last clause of verse 13, from the scribe's confusion with what follows. It is not even true in fact; for the apostle had not written yet to the παιδία. The true reading, though not so well supported, is γράφω for all three on the first mention, ἔγραψα, for all three on the second. Muddle is the result for the exposition founded on an evident misreading. To say that παιδία is here "addressed to all the readers" is to ignore words, context and sense. (Exp. of Epist. of John, p.119)
write: There is preponderant witness for "I wrote" here, as there is occasionally for as evident blunders of early date in copyists. So it is here, where the context utterly forbids it, and its introduction brings in nothing but confusion, as is abundantly clear from the commentary of Dean Alford swayed by it. (Exp. of Epist. of John, p.109)
write: It is granted that diplomatic evidence is decidedly in favor of the misreading ἔγ. in the end of 13. In fact, only K, a Moscow uncial, with a fair amount of cursives and some ancient versions, stands opposed to the great mass of ancient authority. It is one of the very few cases where a few witnesses of less value contain the true reading disfigured from an early date, so that the error was widely diffused. The effect is most disastrous on the interpretation, as any English reader may see in Dean Alford's work, where we are thereby landed in the bewildering conclusion that we have three classes of readers, denoted the first time by τεκνία! πατέρες, νεανίσκοι, and the second time by παιδία, πατέρς, νεανίσκοι: a strange confusion, where the fathers are made the central group, first introduced by τ. and then by π. as if these were identical, whereas there is the necessity of admitting that τ. and π. are differently addressed; a singular thing if they were the same class, to the loss of the truth that the first is the general designation, as the latter described particularly the youngest class. The inference is that τ. and π. address all the readers alike! and that "nothing satisfactory" comes out, which is very true. If γράφω be accepted all through 13, light dawns, and the beautiful order of the truth shines unmistakably. After speaking of all in 12, the writer first briefly addresses each of the three subdivisions, and then a second time more fully, as need required, which gives so much the force to the "fathers" where he could only repeat, without adding one word more; for Christ is all. (Bible Treasury 14:111)
write: Is it not due to the same lack of appreciating the truth intended that the Revisers like others adopt the well nigh absurd variant ἔγραψα instead of γράφω in the last part of 13? It is contrary to the plain facts of the context, and the necessary bearing of the verse. The Apostle had not written before to the babes; he was now writing to them as such for the first time, as in the same verse to the fathers and to the young men. Then he goes over the ground again to the three in 14-27, where ἔγραψα is requisite, not γράψω. (Bible Treasury 14:111)