Acts 14:10 KJV (With Strong’s)

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10
Said
epo (Greek #2036)
to speak or say (by word or writing)
KJV usage: answer, bid, bring word, call, command, grant, say (on), speak, tell. Compare 3004.
Pronounce: ep'-o
Origin: a primary verb (used only in the definite past tense, the others being borrowed from 2046, 4483, and 5346)
with a loud
megas (Greek #3173)
big (literally or figuratively, in a very wide application)
KJV usage: (+ fear) exceedingly, great(-est), high, large, loud, mighty, + (be) sore (afraid), strong, X to years.
Pronounce: meg'-as
Origin: (including the prolonged forms, feminine μεγάλη, plural μεγάλοι, etc.; compare also 3176, 3187)
voice
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
phone (Greek #5456)
a tone (articulate, bestial or artificial); by implication, an address (for any purpose), saying or language
KJV usage: noise, sound, voice.
Pronounce: fo-nay'
Origin: probably akin to 5316 through the idea of disclosure
, Stand
anistemi (Greek #450)
to stand up (literal or figurative, transitive or intransitive)
KJV usage: arise, lift up, raise up (again), rise (again), stand up(-right).
Pronounce: an-is'-tay-mee
Origin: from 303 and 2476
upright
orthos (Greek #3717)
right (as rising), i.e. (perpendicularly) erect (figuratively, honest), or (horizontally) level or direct
KJV usage: straight, upright.
Pronounce: or-thos'
Origin: probably from the base of 3735
on
epi (Greek #1909)
properly, meaning superimposition (of time, place, order, etc.), as a relation of distribution (with the genitive case), i.e. over, upon, etc.; of rest (with the dative case) at, on, etc.; of direction (with the accusative case) towards, upon, etc.
KJV usage: about (the times), above, after, against, among, as long as (touching), at, beside, X have charge of, (be-, (where-))fore, in (a place, as much as, the time of, -to), (because) of, (up-)on (behalf of), over, (by, for) the space of, through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), with. In compounds it retains essentially the same import, at, upon, etc. (literally or figuratively).
Pronounce: ep-ee'
Origin: a primary preposition
thy
sou (Greek #4675)
of thee, thy
KJV usage: X home, thee, thine (own), thou, thy.
Pronounce: soo
Origin: genitive case of 4771
feet
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
pous (Greek #4228)
a "foot" (figuratively or literally)
KJV usage: foot(-stool).
Pronounce: pooce
Origin: a primary word
. And
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
he leaped
hallomai (Greek #242)
to jump; figuratively, to gush
KJV usage: leap, spring up.
Pronounce: hal'-lom-ahee
Origin: middle voice of apparently a primary verb
i and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
walked
peripateo (Greek #4043)
to tread all around, i.e. walk at large (especially as proof of ability); figuratively, to live, deport oneself, follow (as a companion or votary)
KJV usage: go, be occupied with, walk (about).
Pronounce: per-ee-pat-eh'-o
Origin: from 4012 and 3961
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Cross References

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Stand.
Acts 3:6‑8• 6Then Peter said, Silver and gold have I none; but such as I have give I thee: In the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth rise up and walk.
7And he took him by the right hand, and lifted him up: and immediately his feet and ankle bones received strength.
8And he leaping up stood, and walked, and entered with them into the temple, walking, and leaping, and praising God.
(Acts 3:6‑8)
;
Acts 9:33‑34• 33And there he found a certain man named Eneas, which had kept his bed eight years, and was sick of the palsy.
34And Peter said unto him, Eneas, Jesus Christ maketh thee whole: arise, and make thy bed. And he arose immediately.
(Acts 9:33‑34)
;
Isa. 35:6• 6Then shall the lame man leap as an hart, and the tongue of the dumb sing: for in the wilderness shall waters break out, and streams in the desert. (Isa. 35:6)
;
Luke 7:14• 14And he came and touched the bier: and they that bare him stood still. And he said, Young man, I say unto thee, Arise. (Luke 7:14)
;
Luke 13:11‑13• 11And, behold, there was a woman which had a spirit of infirmity eighteen years, and was bowed together, and could in no wise lift up herself.
12And when Jesus saw her, he called her to him, and said unto her, Woman, thou art loosed from thine infirmity.
13And he laid his hands on her: and immediately she was made straight, and glorified God.
(Luke 13:11‑13)
;
John 5:8‑9• 8Jesus saith unto him, Rise, take up thy bed, and walk.
9And immediately the man was made whole, and took up his bed, and walked: and on the same day was the sabbath.
(John 5:8‑9)
;
John 14:12• 12Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that believeth on me, the works that I do shall he do also; and greater works than these shall he do; because I go unto my Father. (John 14:12)

J. N. Darby Translation

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10
said with a loud voice, Rise up straight upon thy feet: and he sprang up and walked.

W. Kelly Translation

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10
said with a loud voice, Rise upright on thy feet: and he leaped up and walked1.

WK Translation Notes

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1
^ Rise: (Lachmann follows C D E et al., in adding, ’I say to thee, In the name of the Lord Jesus Christ.’)... The addition to verse 10 ... was made early to save the appearance of pretension on the part of him who wrought the miracle. The absence of the clause is the instructive lesson that as such words would be unavailing in another mouth (definitely proved long after at Ephesus), so they are by no means called for where all the life and testimony were set on magnifying Christ. There was no legally required formula. Of all men Paul was most conspicuously, as he loved to call himself, the ’bondman of Jesus Christ’; so that in his case it was the less necessary by a formal declaration to disclaim any virtue to heal by his own power or holiness. (Exp. of Acts, p.199-200)