Col. 2:20 KJV (With Strong’s)

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20
Wherefore
oun (Greek #3767)
(adverbially) certainly, or (conjunctionally) accordingly
KJV usage: and (so, truly), but, now (then), so (likewise then), then, therefore, verily, wherefore.
Pronounce: oon
Origin: apparently a primary word
if
ei (Greek #1487)
if, whether, that, etc.
KJV usage: forasmuch as, if, that, (al-)though, whether. Often used in connection or composition with other particles, especially as in 1489, 1490, 1499, 1508, 1509, 1512, 1513, 1536, 1537. See also 1437.
Pronounce: i
Origin: a primary particle of conditionality
ye be dead
apothnesko (Greek #599)
to die off (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: be dead, death, die, lie a-dying, be slain (X with).
Pronounce: ap-oth-nace'-ko
Origin: from 575 and 2348
with
sun (Greek #4862)
with or together (but much closer than 3326 or 3844), i.e. by association, companionship, process, resemblance, possession, instrumentality, addition, etc.
KJV usage: beside, with. In composition it has similar applications, including completeness.
Pronounce: soon
Origin: a primary preposition denoting union
Christ
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
Christos (Greek #5547)
anointed, i.e. the Messiah, an epithet of Jesus
KJV usage: Christ.
Pronounce: khris-tos'
Origin: from 5548
from
apo (Greek #575)
"off," i.e. away (from something near), in various senses (of place, time, or relation; literal or figurative)
KJV usage: (X here-)after, ago, at, because of, before, by (the space of), for(-th), from, in, (out) of, off, (up-)on(-ce), since, with. In composition (as a prefix) it usually denotes separation, departure, cessation, completion, reversal, etc.
Pronounce: apo'
Origin: a primary particle
the λrudiments
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
stoicheion (Greek #4747)
something orderly in arrangement, i.e. (by implication) a serial (basal, fundamental, initial) constituent (literally), proposition (figuratively)
KJV usage: element, principle, rudiment.
Pronounce: stoy-khi'-on
Origin: neuter of a presumed derivative of the base of 4748
of the world
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
kosmos (Greek #2889)
orderly arrangement, i.e. decoration; by implication, the world (in a wide or narrow sense, including its inhabitants, literally or figuratively (morally))
KJV usage: adorning, world.
Pronounce: kos'-mos
Origin: probably from the base of 2865
, why
tis (Greek #5101)
an interrogative pronoun, who, which or what (in direct or indirect questions)
KJV usage: every man, how (much), + no(-ne, thing), what (manner, thing), where (-by, -fore, -of, -unto, - with, -withal), whether, which, who(-m, -se), why.
Pronounce: tis
Origin: probably emphatic of 5100
, as though
hos (Greek #5613)
which how, i.e. in that manner (very variously used, as follows)
KJV usage: about, after (that), (according) as (it had been, it were), as soon (as), even as (like), for, how (greatly), like (as, unto), since, so (that), that, to wit, unto, when(-soever), while, X with all speed.
Pronounce: hoce
Origin: probably adverb of comparative from 3739
living
zao (Greek #2198)
to live (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: life(-time), (a-)live(-ly), quick.
Pronounce: dzah'-o
Origin: a primary verb
in
en (Greek #1722)
"in," at, (up-)on, by, etc.
KJV usage: about, after, against, + almost, X altogether, among, X as, at, before, between, (here-)by (+ all means), for (... sake of), + give self wholly to, (here-)in(-to, -wardly), X mightily, (because) of, (up-)on, (open-)ly, X outwardly, one, X quickly, X shortly, (speedi-)ly, X that, X there(-in, -on), through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), under, when, where(-with), while, with(-in). Often used in compounds, with substantially the same import; rarely with verbs of motion, and then not to indicate direction, except (elliptically) by a separate (and different) preposition.
Pronounce: en
Origin: a primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), i.e. a relation of rest (intermediate between 1519 and 1537)
the world
kosmos (Greek #2889)
orderly arrangement, i.e. decoration; by implication, the world (in a wide or narrow sense, including its inhabitants, literally or figuratively (morally))
KJV usage: adorning, world.
Pronounce: kos'-mos
Origin: probably from the base of 2865
, are ye subject to ordinances
dogmatizo (Greek #1379)
to prescribe by statute, i.e. (reflexively) to submit to, ceremonially rule
KJV usage: be subject to ordinances.
Pronounce: dog-mat-id'-zo
Origin: from 1378
,
λ
or, elements.

More on:

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Cross References

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Ministry on This Verse

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Col. 3:3• 3For ye are dead, and your life is hid with Christ in God. (Col. 3:3)
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Rom. 6:2‑11• 2God forbid. How shall we, that are dead to sin, live any longer therein?
3Know ye not, that so many of us as were baptized into Jesus Christ were baptized into his death?
4Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life.
5For if we have been planted together in the likeness of his death, we shall be also in the likeness of his resurrection:
6Knowing this, that our old man is crucified with him, that the body of sin might be destroyed, that henceforth we should not serve sin.
7For he that is dead is freed from sin.
8Now if we be dead with Christ, we believe that we shall also live with him:
9Knowing that Christ being raised from the dead dieth no more; death hath no more dominion over him.
10For in that he died, he died unto sin once: but in that he liveth, he liveth unto God.
11Likewise reckon ye also yourselves to be dead indeed unto sin, but alive unto God through Jesus Christ our Lord.
(Rom. 6:2‑11)
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Rom. 7:4‑6• 4Wherefore, my brethren, ye also are become dead to the law by the body of Christ; that ye should be married to another, even to him who is raised from the dead, that we should bring forth fruit unto God.
5For when we were in the flesh, the motions of sins, which were by the law, did work in our members to bring forth fruit unto death.
6But now we are delivered from the law, that being dead wherein we were held; that we should serve in newness of spirit, and not in the oldness of the letter.
(Rom. 7:4‑6)
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Gal. 2:19‑20• 19For I through the law am dead to the law, that I might live unto God.
20I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me: and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave himself for me.
(Gal. 2:19‑20)
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Gal. 6:14• 14But God forbid that I should glory, save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom the world is crucified unto me, and I unto the world. (Gal. 6:14)
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1 Peter 4:1‑3• 1Forasmuch then as Christ hath suffered for us in the flesh, arm yourselves likewise with the same mind: for he that hath suffered in the flesh hath ceased from sin;
2That he no longer should live the rest of his time in the flesh to the lusts of men, but to the will of God.
3For the time past of our life may suffice us to have wrought the will of the Gentiles, when we walked in lasciviousness, lusts, excess of wine, revellings, banquetings, and abominable idolatries:
(1 Peter 4:1‑3)
from.
rudiments.
or, elements.
living.
subject.
 He applies the principle of death to all the ordinances and to the asceticism which treated the body as a thing vile in itself which ought to be rejected. (Colossians 2 by J.N. Darby)
 Col. 2:20 and Col. 3:1 follow on Col. 2:11-12, and we have the putting off of the old and putting on of the new man. (Colossians 2 by J.N. Darby)
 Ordinances which apply to things which perish in the use of them and which have no connection with that which is heavenly and eternal….They put a man in and under the flesh, while pretending to deliver us from it, and they separate the believer from Christ by putting angels between the soul and the heavenly place and blessing. (Colossians 2 by J.N. Darby)
 From verse 20 the Apostle applies our death and resurrection with Christ ...to the deliverance of the Colossians by raising their thoughts on high. (Colossians 2 by J.N. Darby)
 The passage we are going to consider shows that this system is absurd, cannot be applied to us, has no possible application, because of our position. On the one hand, it is a false system, null and void in all its parts, if Christ is true and is in heaven; and, on the other hand, it is an absurd system in its application to us, if we are Christians. (Colossians 2 by J.N. Darby)
 It is the knowledge of Jesus as the truth, which alone manifests the character of rudiments or elements of the world. The expression is applied by the Apostle Paul to ordinances instituted by God Himself, as well as to the current philosophical dogmas or ordinances. As elements or rudiments simply, it is applied by the same Apostle in the Hebrews, to that measure of the knowledge of Christ, great and blessed as it was, which might have been gathered from the ancient oracles of God, but which fell amazingly below the fullness of that gospel, preached "with the Holy Ghost sent down from heaven." (Rudiments of the World)
 the principle of making "religious duties" supplemental to man's defective righteousness. It is this principle which calls forth the most cutting reproof from the Apostle, and at the same time leads him to speak in terms so disparaging of the ancient ordinances of God. (Rudiments of the World)
 Paul exposed the folly of seeking spiritual attainment through carnal ordinances and ascetic practices (punishing the body in an attempt to keep it from obeying the lusts of the flesh). He gives an example of the rules and regulations that accompany many of these ordinances—“Touch not, taste not, handle not.” (The Believer's Identification With the Death and Resurrection of Christ by B. Anstey)
 They will say, “We have to die to ourselves so that Christ can live in us.” The truth is that the Christian is “dead with Christ” (vs. 20). He is also “dead to sin” (Rom. 6:2) and “dead to the Law”(Rom. 7:4). (The Believer's Identification With the Death and Resurrection of Christ by B. Anstey)

J. N. Darby Translation

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If ye have died with Christ from the elements of the world, why as if alive in the world do ye subject yourselves to ordinances?

W. Kelly Translation

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If ye died with Christ from the elements of the world, why, as alive in [the] world, do ye subject yourselves to ordinances?