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James 3

James 3:2 KJV (With Strong’s)

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For
gar (Greek #1063)
properly, assigning a reason (used in argument, explanation or intensification; often with other particles)
KJV usage: and, as, because (that), but, even, for, indeed, no doubt, seeing, then, therefore, verily, what, why, yet.
Pronounce: gar
Origin: a primary particle
a in many things
polus (Greek #4183)
(singular) much (in any respect) or (plural) many; neuter (singular) as adverbial, largely; neuter (plural) as adverb or noun often, mostly, largely
KJV usage: abundant, + altogether, common, + far (passed, spent), (+ be of a) great (age, deal, -ly, while), long, many, much, oft(-en (-times)), plenteous, sore, straitly. Compare 4118, 4119.
Pronounce: pol-oos'
Origin: including the forms from the alternate πολλός
we offend
ptaio (Greek #4417)
to trip, i.e. (figuratively) to err, sin, fail (of salvation)
KJV usage: fall, offend, stumble.
Pronounce: ptah'-yo
Origin: a form of 4098
all
hapas (Greek #537)
absolutely all or (singular) every one
KJV usage: all (things), every (one), whole.
Pronounce: hap'-as
Origin: from 1 (as a particle of union) and 3956
. If
ei (Greek #1487)
if, whether, that, etc.
KJV usage: forasmuch as, if, that, (al-)though, whether. Often used in connection or composition with other particles, especially as in 1489, 1490, 1499, 1508, 1509, 1512, 1513, 1536, 1537. See also 1437.
Pronounce: i
Origin: a primary particle of conditionality
any man
tis (Greek #5100)
some or any person or object
KJV usage: a (kind of), any (man, thing, thing at all), certain (thing), divers, he (every) man, one (X thing), ought, + partly, some (man, -body, - thing, -what), (+ that no-)thing, what(-soever), X wherewith, whom(-soever), whose(-soever).
Pronounce: tis
Origin: an enclitic indefinite pronoun
offend
ptaio (Greek #4417)
to trip, i.e. (figuratively) to err, sin, fail (of salvation)
KJV usage: fall, offend, stumble.
Pronounce: ptah'-yo
Origin: a form of 4098
not
ou (Greek #3756)
the absolute negative (compare 3361) adverb; no or not
KJV usage: + long, nay, neither, never, no (X man), none, (can-)not, + nothing, + special, un(-worthy), when, + without, + yet but. See also 3364, 3372.
Pronounce: oo
Origin: οὐκ (ook), and (before an aspirate) οὐχ (ookh) a primary word
in
en (Greek #1722)
"in," at, (up-)on, by, etc.
KJV usage: about, after, against, + almost, X altogether, among, X as, at, before, between, (here-)by (+ all means), for (... sake of), + give self wholly to, (here-)in(-to, -wardly), X mightily, (because) of, (up-)on, (open-)ly, X outwardly, one, X quickly, X shortly, (speedi-)ly, X that, X there(-in, -on), through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), under, when, where(-with), while, with(-in). Often used in compounds, with substantially the same import; rarely with verbs of motion, and then not to indicate direction, except (elliptically) by a separate (and different) preposition.
Pronounce: en
Origin: a primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), i.e. a relation of rest (intermediate between 1519 and 1537)
word
logos (Greek #3056)
something said (including the thought); by implication, a topic (subject of discourse), also reasoning (the mental faculty) or motive; by extension, a computation; specially, (with the article in John) the Divine Expression (i.e. Christ)
KJV usage: account, cause, communication, X concerning, doctrine, fame, X have to do, intent, matter, mouth, preaching, question, reason, + reckon, remove, say(-ing), shew, X speaker, speech, talk, thing, + none of these things move me, tidings, treatise, utterance, word, work.
Pronounce: log'-os
Origin: from 3004
c, the same
houtos (Greek #3778)
the he (she or it), i.e. this or that (often with article repeated)
KJV usage: he (it was that), hereof, it, she, such as, the same, these, they, this (man, same, woman), which, who.
Pronounce: hoo'-tos
Origin: οὗτοι (hoo'-toy), nominative feminine singular αὕτη (how'-tay), and nominative feminine plural αὕται (how'-tahee) from the article 3588 and 846
is a perfect
teleios (Greek #5046)
complete (in various applications of labor, growth, mental and moral character, etc.); neuter (as noun, with 3588) completeness
KJV usage: of full age, man, perfect.
Pronounce: tel'-i-os
Origin: from 5056
man
aner (Greek #435)
a man (properly as an individual male)
KJV usage: fellow, husband, man, sir.
Pronounce: an'-ayr
Origin: a primary word (compare 444)
, and able
dunatos (Greek #1415)
powerful or capable (literally or figuratively); neuter possible
KJV usage: able, could, (that is) mighty (man), possible, power, strong.
Pronounce: doo-nat-os'
Origin: from 1410
also
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
to bridle
chalinagogeo (Greek #5468)
to be a bit-leader, i.e. to curb (figuratively)
KJV usage: bridle.
Pronounce: khal-in-ag-ogue-eh'-o
Origin: from a compound of 5469 and the reduplicated form of 71
the whole
holos (Greek #3650)
"whole" or "all", i.e. complete (in extent, amount, time or degree), especially (neuter) as noun or adverb
KJV usage: all, altogether, every whit, + throughout, whole.
Pronounce: hol'-os
Origin: a primary word
body
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
soma (Greek #4983)
the body (as a sound whole), used in a very wide application, literally or figuratively
KJV usage: bodily, body, slave.
Pronounce: so'-mah
Origin: from 4982
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Cross References

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Ministry on This Verse

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1 Kings 8:46• 46If they sin against thee, (for there is no man that sinneth not,) and thou be angry with them, and deliver them to the enemy, so that they carry them away captives unto the land of the enemy, far or near; (1 Kings 8:46)
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2 Chron. 6:36• 36If they sin against thee, (for there is no man which sinneth not,) and thou be angry with them, and deliver them over before their enemies, and they carry them away captives unto a land far off or near; (2 Chron. 6:36)
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Prov. 20:9• 9Who can say, I have made my heart clean, I am pure from my sin? (Prov. 20:9)
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Eccl. 7:20• 20For there is not a just man upon earth, that doeth good, and sinneth not. (Eccl. 7:20)
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Isa. 64:6• 6But we are all as an unclean thing, and all our righteousnesses are as filthy rags; and we all do fade as a leaf; and our iniquities, like the wind, have taken us away. (Isa. 64:6)
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Rom. 3:10• 10As it is written, There is none righteous, no, not one: (Rom. 3:10)
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Rom. 7:21• 21I find then a law, that, when I would do good, evil is present with me. (Rom. 7:21)
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Gal. 3:22• 22But the scripture hath concluded all under sin, that the promise by faith of Jesus Christ might be given to them that believe. (Gal. 3:22)
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Gal. 5:17• 17For the flesh lusteth against the Spirit, and the Spirit against the flesh: and these are contrary the one to the other: so that ye cannot do the things that ye would. (Gal. 5:17)
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1 John 1:8‑10• 8If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us.
9If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.
10If we say that we have not sinned, we make him a liar, and his word is not in us.
(1 John 1:8‑10)
If.
a perfect.
to bridle.
 In no way is it so easy to offend as in words. The man that can bridle his tongue will be a full-grown Christian, a perfect man, able to control every other member of his body. (The Evil of the Flesh: James 3-4 by H. Smith)
 To offend against God in our words is especially serious if we be teachers, since it is by words that we teach. This is illustrated by the case of Moses. (James 3 by F.B. Hole)
 It should teach us to be slow in taking the place of a master, for it is eminently right that he who aspires to be master of others should first be master of himself. (James 3 by F.B. Hole)

J. N. Darby Translation

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For we all often offend. If any one offend not in word, *he* is a perfect man, able to bridle the whole body too.

W. Kelly Translation

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For in many things we all offend. If any one offendeth not in word, he [is] a perfect man, able to bridle the whole body also.