Jude 6 KJV (With Strong’s)

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6
And
te (Greek #5037)
both or also (properly, as correlation of 2532)
KJV usage: also, and, both, even, then, whether. Often used in composition, usually as the latter participle.
Pronounce: teh
Origin: a primary particle (enclitic) of connection or addition
the angels
aggelos (Greek #32)
a messenger; especially an "angel"; by implication, a pastor
KJV usage: angel, messenger.
Pronounce: ang'-el-os
Origin: from ἀγγέλλω (probably derived from 71; compare 34) (to bring tidings)
x which kept
tereo (Greek #5083)
to guard (from loss or injury, properly, by keeping the eye upon; and thus differing from 5442, which is properly to prevent escaping; and from 2892, which implies a fortress or full military lines of apparatus), i.e. to note (a prophecy; figuratively, to fulfil a command); by implication, to detain (in custody; figuratively, to maintain); by extension, to withhold (for personal ends; figuratively, to keep unmarried); by extension, to withhold (for personal ends; figuratively, to keep unmarried)
KJV usage: hold fast, keep(- er), (pre-, re-)serve, watch.
Pronounce: tay-reh'-o
Origin: from τερός (a watch; perhaps akin to 2334)
not
me (Greek #3361)
(adverb) not, (conjunction) lest; also (as an interrogative implying a negative answer (whereas 3756 expects an affirmative one)) whether
KJV usage: any but (that), X forbear, + God forbid, + lack, lest, neither, never, no (X wise in), none, nor, (can-)not, nothing, that not, un(-taken), without. Often used in compounds in substantially the same relations. See also 3362, 3363, 3364, 3372, 3373, 3375, 3378.
Pronounce: may
Origin: a primary particle of qualified negation (whereas 3756 expresses an absolute denial)
their
heautou (Greek #1438)
him- (her-, it-, them-, also (in conjunction with the personal pronoun of the other persons) my-, thy-, our-, your-) self (selves), etc.
KJV usage: alone, her (own, -self), (he) himself, his (own), itself, one (to) another, our (thine) own(-selves), + that she had, their (own, own selves), (of) them(-selves), they, thyself, you, your (own, own conceits, own selves, -selves).
Pronounce: heh-ow-too'
Origin: from a reflexive pronoun otherwise obsolete and the genitive case (dative case or accusative case) of 846
δfirst estate
arche (Greek #746)
(properly abstract) a commencement, or (concretely) chief (in various applications of order, time, place, or rank)
KJV usage: beginning, corner, (at the, the) first (estate), magistrate, power, principality, principle, rule.
Pronounce: ar-khay'
Origin: from 756
, but
alla (Greek #235)
properly, other things, i.e. (adverbially) contrariwise (in many relations)
KJV usage: and, but (even), howbeit, indeed, nay, nevertheless, no, notwithstanding, save, therefore, yea, yet.
Pronounce: al-lah'
Origin: neuter plural of 243
left
apoleipo (Greek #620)
to leave behind (passively, remain); by implication, to forsake
KJV usage: leave, remain.
Pronounce: ap-ol-ipe'-o
Origin: from 575 and 3007
their own
idios (Greek #2398)
pertaining to self, i.e. one's own; by implication, private or separate
KJV usage: X his acquaintance, when they were alone, apart, aside, due, his (own, proper, several), home, (her, our, thine, your) own (business), private(-ly), proper, severally, their (own).
Pronounce: id'-ee-os
Origin: of uncertain affinity
habitation
oiketerion (Greek #3613)
a residence (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: habitation, house.
Pronounce: oy-kay-tay'-ree-on
Origin: neuter of a presumed derivative of 3611 (equivalent to 3612)
, he hath reserved
tereo (Greek #5083)
to guard (from loss or injury, properly, by keeping the eye upon; and thus differing from 5442, which is properly to prevent escaping; and from 2892, which implies a fortress or full military lines of apparatus), i.e. to note (a prophecy; figuratively, to fulfil a command); by implication, to detain (in custody; figuratively, to maintain); by extension, to withhold (for personal ends; figuratively, to keep unmarried); by extension, to withhold (for personal ends; figuratively, to keep unmarried)
KJV usage: hold fast, keep(- er), (pre-, re-)serve, watch.
Pronounce: tay-reh'-o
Origin: from τερός (a watch; perhaps akin to 2334)
in
desmon (Greek #1199)
a band, i.e. ligament (of the body) or shackle (of a prisoner); figuratively, an impediment or disability
KJV usage: band, bond, chain, string.
Pronounce: des-mon'
Origin: or δεσμός (des-mos') neuter and masculine respectively from 1210
everlasting
aidios (Greek #126)
everduring (forward and backward, or forward only)
KJV usage: eternal, everlasting.
Pronounce: ah-id'-ee-os
Origin: from 104
chains
desmon (Greek #1199)
a band, i.e. ligament (of the body) or shackle (of a prisoner); figuratively, an impediment or disability
KJV usage: band, bond, chain, string.
Pronounce: des-mon'
Origin: or δεσμός (des-mos') neuter and masculine respectively from 1210
y under
hupo (Greek #5259)
under, i.e. (with the genitive case) of place (beneath), or with verbs (the agency or means, through); (with the accusative case) of place (whither (underneath) or where (below) or time (when (at))
KJV usage: among, by, from, in, of, under, with. In the comparative, it retains the same general applications, especially of inferior position or condition, and specially, covertly or moderately.
Pronounce: hoop-o'
Origin: a primary preposition
darkness
zophos (Greek #2217)
gloom (as shrouding like a cloud)
KJV usage: blackness, darkness, mist.
Pronounce: dzof'-os
Origin: akin to the base of 3509
unto
eis (Greek #1519)
to or into (indicating the point reached or entered), of place, time, or (figuratively) purpose (result, etc.); also in adverbial phrases
KJV usage: (abundant-)ly, against, among, as, at, (back-)ward, before, by, concerning, + continual, + far more exceeding, for (intent, purpose), fore, + forth, in (among, at, unto, -so much that, -to), to the intent that, + of one mind, + never, of, (up-)on, + perish, + set at one again, (so) that, therefore(-unto), throughout, til, to (be, the end, -ward), (here-)until(-to), ...ward, (where-)fore, with. Often used in composition with the same general import, but only with verbs (etc.) expressing motion (literally or figuratively).
Pronounce: ice
Origin: a primary preposition
the judgment
krisis (Greek #2920)
by extension, a tribunal; by implication, justice (especially, divine law)
KJV usage: accusation, condemnation, damnation, judgment.
Pronounce: kree'-sis
Origin: decision (subjectively or objectively, for or against)
z of the
hemera (Greek #2250)
day, i.e. (literally) the time space between dawn and dark, or the whole 24 hours (but several days were usually reckoned by the Jews as inclusive of the parts of both extremes); figuratively, a period (always defined more or less clearly by the context)
KJV usage: age, + alway, (mid-)day (by day, (-ly)), + for ever, judgment, (day) time, while, years.
Pronounce: hay-mer'-ah
Origin: feminine (with 5610 implied) of a derivative of ἧμαι (to sit; akin to the base of 1476) meaning tame, i.e. gentle
great
megas (Greek #3173)
big (literally or figuratively, in a very wide application)
KJV usage: (+ fear) exceedingly, great(-est), high, large, loud, mighty, + (be) sore (afraid), strong, X to years.
Pronounce: meg'-as
Origin: (including the prolonged forms, feminine μεγάλη, plural μεγάλοι, etc.; compare also 3176, 3187)
day
hemera (Greek #2250)
day, i.e. (literally) the time space between dawn and dark, or the whole 24 hours (but several days were usually reckoned by the Jews as inclusive of the parts of both extremes); figuratively, a period (always defined more or less clearly by the context)
KJV usage: age, + alway, (mid-)day (by day, (-ly)), + for ever, judgment, (day) time, while, years.
Pronounce: hay-mer'-ah
Origin: feminine (with 5610 implied) of a derivative of ἧμαι (to sit; akin to the base of 1476) meaning tame, i.e. gentle
.*
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections

Cross References

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Ministry on This Verse

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 The sin of the angels who kept not their first estate was rather that of disobedience; for one characteristic of those who have been preserved is that they "do His commandments." (Psa. 103:20) (The Epistle of Jude 1-7)
 one sees the propriety of the flood being brought in by Peter, because it was the universal unrighteousness and rebelliousness of the whole world. Jude, on the other hand, was not given to look at that particularly, but at the hostility that is shown to the truth and to Christ. (Jude 6-8 by W. Kelly)
 It appears there were at least two falls of angels, one was the one we call Satan-when man was made, Satan tempted man through Eve. With regard to those ordinary evil angels of which we read in the Bible from Genesis down to Revelation, they are not under everlasting chains at all. They are roving about the world continually, and so far from being in chains of darkness, in "tortures" as it is called here, they are allowed access to heaven (Jude 6-8 by W. Kelly)
 These angels fell into a very peculiar iniquity, which is in a general way spoken of in Peter, but in a special way in Jude. They were put under chains of darkness and not allowed to stir out of their prison. They are not the angels that tempt us now. They did their bad work just a little time before the flood. (Jude 6-8 by W. Kelly)

J. N. Darby Translation

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6
And angels who had not kept their own original state, but had abandoned their own dwelling, he keepsh in eternal chains under gloomy darkness, to the judgment of the great day;

JND Translation Notes

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h
The Greek perfect tense; signifying here the continuance of what had begun in the past.

W. Kelly Translation

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6
aAnd angels which kept not their own original estate, but abandoned their proper dwelling, he hath kept in everlasting bonds under gloom unto [the] great day’s judgment;

WK Translation Notes

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a
^ angels: "angels" rightly in the Revised Version, not "the" as if all were concerned. It is a defined set among the angels. (Bible Treasury 14:127)
hath kept in: [The American correctors of the RV] do not notice the scarcely English phrase "hath kept... unto," though one may shrink from G. Wakefield's "keepeth" as hardly a right rendering of the prf. But "hath in keeping" might suffice. (Bible Treasury 15:144)
unto: But is "hath kept... unto" good English? "He hath in keeping" might do better perhaps; and so I see, nearly, Mr. T. S. Green. (Bible Treasury 14:127)