Rom. 4:25 KJV (With Strong’s)

+
25
Who
hos (Greek #3739)
the relatively (sometimes demonstrative) pronoun, who, which, what, that
KJV usage: one, (an-, the) other, some, that, what, which, who(-m, -se), etc. See also 3757.
Pronounce: hos
Origin: ἥ (hay), and neuter ὅ (ho) probably a primary word (or perhaps a form of the article 3588)
was delivered
paradidomi (Greek #3860)
to surrender, i.e yield up, intrust, transmit
KJV usage: betray, bring forth, cast, commit, deliver (up), give (over, up), hazard, put in prison, recommend.
Pronounce: par-ad-id'-o-mee
Origin: from 3844 and 1325
m for
dia (Greek #1223)
through (in very wide applications, local, causal, or occasional)
KJV usage: after, always, among, at, to avoid, because of (that), briefly, by, for (cause) ... fore, from, in, by occasion of, of, by reason of, for sake, that, thereby, therefore, X though, through(-out), to, wherefore, with (-in). In composition it retains the same general importance.
Pronounce: dee-ah'
Origin: a primary preposition denoting the channel of an act
our
hemon (Greek #2257)
of (or from) us
KJV usage: our (company), us, we.
Pronounce: hay-mone'
Origin: genitive case plural of 1473
offences
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
paraptoma (Greek #3900)
a side-slip (lapse or deviation), i.e. (unintentional) error or (wilful) transgression
KJV usage: fall, fault, offence, sin, trespass.
Pronounce: par-ap'-to-mah
Origin: from 3895
, and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
was raisedn again
egeiro (Greek #1453)
to waken (transitively or intransitively), i.e. rouse (literally, from sleep, from sitting or lying, from disease, from death; or figuratively, from obscurity, inactivity, ruins, nonexistence)
KJV usage: awake, lift (up), raise (again, up), rear up, (a-)rise (again, up), stand, take up.
Pronounce: eg-i'-ro
Origin: probably akin to the base of 58 (through the idea of collecting one's faculties)
for
dia (Greek #1223)
through (in very wide applications, local, causal, or occasional)
KJV usage: after, always, among, at, to avoid, because of (that), briefly, by, for (cause) ... fore, from, in, by occasion of, of, by reason of, for sake, that, thereby, therefore, X though, through(-out), to, wherefore, with (-in). In composition it retains the same general importance.
Pronounce: dee-ah'
Origin: a primary preposition denoting the channel of an act
our
hemon (Greek #2257)
of (or from) us
KJV usage: our (company), us, we.
Pronounce: hay-mone'
Origin: genitive case plural of 1473
justification
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
dikaiosis (Greek #1347)
aquittal (for Christ's sake)
KJV usage: justification.
Pronounce: dik-ah'-yo-sis
Origin: from 1344
.

Cross References

+
Who was.
Rom. 3:25• 25Whom God hath set forth to be a propitiation through faith in his blood, to declare his righteousness for the remission of sins that are past, through the forbearance of God; (Rom. 3:25)
;
Rom. 5:6‑8• 6For when we were yet without strength, in due time Christ died for the ungodly.
7For scarcely for a righteous man will one die: yet peradventure for a good man some would even dare to die.
8But God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.
(Rom. 5:6‑8)
;
Rom. 8:3,32• 3For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh:
32He that spared not his own Son, but delivered him up for us all, how shall he not with him also freely give us all things?
(Rom. 8:3,32)
;
Isa. 53:5‑6,10‑12• 5But he was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed.
6All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned every one to his own way; and the Lord hath laid on him the iniquity of us all.
10Yet it pleased the Lord to bruise him; he hath put him to grief: when thou shalt make his soul an offering for sin, he shall see his seed, he shall prolong his days, and the pleasure of the Lord shall prosper in his hand.
11He shall see of the travail of his soul, and shall be satisfied: by his knowledge shall my righteous servant justify many; for he shall bear their iniquities.
12Therefore will I divide him a portion with the great, and he shall divide the spoil with the strong; because he hath poured out his soul unto death: and he was numbered with the transgressors; and he bare the sin of many, and made intercession for the transgressors.
(Isa. 53:5‑6,10‑12)
;
Dan. 9:24,26• 24Seventy weeks are determined upon thy people and upon thy holy city, to finish the transgression, and to make an end of sins, and to make reconciliation for iniquity, and to bring in everlasting righteousness, and to seal up the vision and prophecy, and to anoint the most Holy.
26And after threescore and two weeks shall Messiah be cut off, but not for himself: and the people of the prince that shall come shall destroy the city and the sanctuary; and the end thereof shall be with a flood, and unto the end of the war desolations are determined.
(Dan. 9:24,26)
;
Zech. 13:7• 7Awake, O sword, against my shepherd, and against the man that is my fellow, saith the Lord of hosts: smite the shepherd, and the sheep shall be scattered: and I will turn mine hand upon the little ones. (Zech. 13:7)
;
Matt. 20:28• 28Even as the Son of man came not to be ministered unto, but to minister, and to give his life a ransom for many. (Matt. 20:28)
;
1 Cor. 15:3‑4• 3For I delivered unto you first of all that which I also received, how that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures;
4And that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the scriptures:
(1 Cor. 15:3‑4)
;
2 Cor. 5:21• 21For he hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him. (2 Cor. 5:21)
;
Gal. 1:4• 4Who gave himself for our sins, that he might deliver us from this present evil world, according to the will of God and our Father: (Gal. 1:4)
;
Gal. 3:13• 13Christ hath redeemed us from the curse of the law, being made a curse for us: for it is written, Cursed is every one that hangeth on a tree: (Gal. 3:13)
;
Eph. 5:2• 2And walk in love, as Christ also hath loved us, and hath given himself for us an offering and a sacrifice to God for a sweetsmelling savor. (Eph. 5:2)
;
Titus 2:14• 14Who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all iniquity, and purify unto himself a peculiar people, zealous of good works. (Titus 2:14)
;
Heb. 9:28• 28So Christ was once offered to bear the sins of many; and unto them that look for him shall he appear the second time without sin unto salvation. (Heb. 9:28)
;
1 Peter 1:18‑19• 18Forasmuch as ye know that ye were not redeemed with corruptible things, as silver and gold, from your vain conversation received by tradition from your fathers;
19But with the precious blood of Christ, as of a lamb without blemish and without spot:
(1 Peter 1:18‑19)
;
1 Peter 2:24• 24Who his own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness: by whose stripes ye were healed. (1 Peter 2:24)
;
1 Peter 3:18• 18For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh, but quickened by the Spirit: (1 Peter 3:18)
;
1 John 2:2• 2And he is the propitiation for our sins: and not for ours only, but also for the sins of the whole world. (1 John 2:2)
;
1 John 4:9‑10• 9In this was manifested the love of God toward us, because that God sent his only begotten Son into the world, that we might live through him.
10Herein is love, not that we loved God, but that he loved us, and sent his Son to be the propitiation for our sins.
(1 John 4:9‑10)
;
Rev. 1:5• 5And from Jesus Christ, who is the faithful witness, and the first begotten of the dead, and the prince of the kings of the earth. Unto him that loved us, and washed us from our sins in his own blood, (Rev. 1:5)
;
Rev. 5:9• 9And they sung a new song, saying, Thou art worthy to take the book, and to open the seals thereof: for thou wast slain, and hast redeemed us to God by thy blood out of every kindred, and tongue, and people, and nation; (Rev. 5:9)
;
Rev. 7:14• 14And I said unto him, Sir, thou knowest. And he said to me, These are they which came out of great tribulation, and have washed their robes, and made them white in the blood of the Lamb. (Rev. 7:14)
and was raised.

J. N. Darby Translation

+
25
who has been delivered for our offences and has been raised for our justificationh, it will be reckoned.

JND Translation Notes

+
h
See Note k, ch. 5.16.

W. Kelly Translation

+
25
awho was given up on account of our offences and was raised on account of our justification.

WK Translation Notes

+
a
on account of: Διά with the accus. means "for," "on account of," either retrospectively or prospectively, according to the requirement of the context (as here we have instances of each). The active force of δοκαίωσις forbids "because of," as does Romans 5:1, which makes faith necessary to justification. I have therefore preferred "for" as admitting of a similar latitude in English. (Bible Treasury 7:44)
on account of: [Q: I believe there is no sufficient reason to doubt Rom. 4:25 means that Christ was raised "for" our justification. Grammatically, it is well known, "because of" is a common, perhaps the most common, force of the preposition διά, with the accusative. But the form of the word δικαίωσις resists such a view here; and still more does the context, especially chapter 5:1, where justification is made to depend on faith, instead of being treated as a thing already settled independently of believing. I have heard it argued, however, that διὰ τὴν πώρωσιν in Ephesians 4:18 (which, beyond question, means "because of," and not for "the hardness," etc.) sets aside the reasoning grounded on the form of the word. What think you? X.X.]
A. No doubt, πώρωσις, being the active form of nouns like δικαίωσις, may seem to raise a question; but if adequately considered, the difficulty disappears. For πώρωισς has the simple sense of a callous place, as one might say, "it is a hardening of the skin," though the form "hardening" be active, because it was a gradual act, while it is now a state. So νέκρωσις is applied to Sarah's womb; and again, we are to carry about the νέκρωσις of the Lord Jesus. But this is, I apprehend, in no way the case with justifying, or δικαίνσις always means "on account of:" the question is, does it here signify previous to, or after, the resurrection of Christ? People often cite the verse, as if it meant that Christ was raised on account of our having been already justified before He rose. This, I am convinced, would require some such phrase as διὰ τὸ δικαιωθῆναι ἠμᾶς, which essentially differs from that which St. Paul employs. In the present case, there would be no process like that of πώρωσις, or νέκρωσις. (which words express a state as result), but a state existing by the simple act of another, a relationship in virtue of an act done. This, the active form, does not, I believe, express; an effect to be produced it can express. The great doctrinal mischief of the alleged rendering, "because of," is, that it excludes faith from justifying, which is Calvinism, or ultra-Calvinism, but wholly unscriptural. (Bible Treasury 4:32)
justification: The form of the word here and in chapter 5:18 means the act of justification, not the thing done or its ground. (Notes on Romans, xii.)