1 Peter 4:15 KJV (With Strong’s)

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15
But
gar (Greek #1063)
properly, assigning a reason (used in argument, explanation or intensification; often with other particles)
KJV usage: and, as, because (that), but, even, for, indeed, no doubt, seeing, then, therefore, verily, what, why, yet.
Pronounce: gar
Origin: a primary particle
let
pascho (Greek #3958)
to experience a sensation or impression (usually painful)
KJV usage: feel, passion, suffer, vex.
Pronounce: pas'-kho
Origin: πάθω (path'-o), and πένθω (pen'-tho), used only in certain tenses for it apparently a primary verb
none
me (Greek #3361)
(adverb) not, (conjunction) lest; also (as an interrogative implying a negative answer (whereas 3756 expects an affirmative one)) whether
KJV usage: any but (that), X forbear, + God forbid, + lack, lest, neither, never, no (X wise in), none, nor, (can-)not, nothing, that not, un(-taken), without. Often used in compounds in substantially the same relations. See also 3362, 3363, 3364, 3372, 3373, 3375, 3378.
Pronounce: may
Origin: a primary particle of qualified negation (whereas 3756 expresses an absolute denial)
*
tis (Greek #5100)
some or any person or object
KJV usage: a (kind of), any (man, thing, thing at all), certain (thing), divers, he (every) man, one (X thing), ought, + partly, some (man, -body, - thing, -what), (+ that no-)thing, what(-soever), X wherewith, whom(-soever), whose(-soever).
Pronounce: tis
Origin: an enclitic indefinite pronoun
of you
humon (Greek #5216)
of (from or concerning) you
KJV usage: ye, you, your (own, -selves).
Pronounce: hoo-mone'
Origin: genitive case of 5210
suffer
pascho (Greek #3958)
to experience a sensation or impression (usually painful)
KJV usage: feel, passion, suffer, vex.
Pronounce: pas'-kho
Origin: πάθω (path'-o), and πένθω (pen'-tho), used only in certain tenses for it apparently a primary verb
as
hos (Greek #5613)
which how, i.e. in that manner (very variously used, as follows)
KJV usage: about, after (that), (according) as (it had been, it were), as soon (as), even as (like), for, how (greatly), like (as, unto), since, so (that), that, to wit, unto, when(-soever), while, X with all speed.
Pronounce: hoce
Origin: probably adverb of comparative from 3739
a murderer
phoneus (Greek #5406)
a murderer (always of criminal (or at least intentional) homicide; which 443 does not necessarily imply; while 4607 is a special term for a public bandit)
KJV usage: murderer.
Pronounce: fon-yooce'
Origin: from 5408
, or
e (Greek #2228)
disjunctive, or; comparative, than
KJV usage: and, but (either), (n-)either, except it be, (n-)or (else), rather, save, than, that, what, yea. Often used in connection with other particles. Compare especially 2235, 2260, 2273.
Pronounce: ay
Origin: a primary particle of distinction between two connected terms
as a thief
kleptes (Greek #2812)
a stealer (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: thief. Compare 3027.
Pronounce: klep'-tace
Origin: from 2813
, or
e (Greek #2228)
disjunctive, or; comparative, than
KJV usage: and, but (either), (n-)either, except it be, (n-)or (else), rather, save, than, that, what, yea. Often used in connection with other particles. Compare especially 2235, 2260, 2273.
Pronounce: ay
Origin: a primary particle of distinction between two connected terms
as an evildoer
kakopoios (Greek #2555)
a bad-doer; (specially), a criminal
KJV usage: evil-doer, malefactor.
Pronounce: kak-op-oy-os'
Origin: from 2556 and 4160
, or
e (Greek #2228)
disjunctive, or; comparative, than
KJV usage: and, but (either), (n-)either, except it be, (n-)or (else), rather, save, than, that, what, yea. Often used in connection with other particles. Compare especially 2235, 2260, 2273.
Pronounce: ay
Origin: a primary particle of distinction between two connected terms
as
hos (Greek #5613)
which how, i.e. in that manner (very variously used, as follows)
KJV usage: about, after (that), (according) as (it had been, it were), as soon (as), even as (like), for, how (greatly), like (as, unto), since, so (that), that, to wit, unto, when(-soever), while, X with all speed.
Pronounce: hoce
Origin: probably adverb of comparative from 3739
a busybody in other men’s matters
allotriepiskopos (Greek #244)
overseeing others' affairs, i.e. a meddler (specially, in Gentile customs)
KJV usage: busybody in other men's matters.
Pronounce: al-lot-ree-ep-is'-kop-os
Origin: from 245 and 1985
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Cross References

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J. N. Darby Translation

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Let none of you suffer indeed as murderer, or thief, or evildoer, or as overseer of other people’s matters;

W. Kelly Translation

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Let none of you suffer as murderer or thief or evil-doer or as overseer of other’s affairs;