2 Peter 1:1 KJV (With Strong’s)

+
1
*
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
,*
Simon (Greek #4613)
Simon (i.e. Shimon), the name of nine Israelites
KJV usage: Simon. Compare 4826.
Pronounce: see'-mone
Origin: of Hebrew origin (08095)
Simon
Sumeon (Greek #4826)
Symeon (i.e. Shimon), the name of five Israelites
KJV usage: Simeon, Simon.
Pronounce: soom-eh-one'
Origin: from the same as 4613
βPeter
Petros (Greek #4074)
a (piece of) rock (larger than 3037); as a name, Petrus, an apostle
KJV usage: Peter, rock. Compare 2786.
Pronounce: pet'-ros
Origin: apparently a primary word
, a servant
doulos (Greek #1401)
a slave (literal or figurative, involuntary or voluntary; frequently, therefore in a qualified sense of subjection or subserviency)
KJV usage: bond(-man), servant.
Pronounce: doo'-los
Origin: from 1210
and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
an apostle
apostolos (Greek #652)
a delegate; specially, an ambassador of the Gospel; officially a commissioner of Christ ("apostle") (with miraculous powers)
KJV usage: apostle, messenger, he that is sent.
Pronounce: ap-os'-tol-os
Origin: from 649
of Jesus
Iesous (Greek #2424)
Jesus (i.e. Jehoshua), the name of our Lord and two (three) other Israelites
KJV usage: Jesus.
Pronounce: ee-ay-sooce'
Origin: of Hebrew origin (03091)
Christ
Christos (Greek #5547)
anointed, i.e. the Messiah, an epithet of Jesus
KJV usage: Christ.
Pronounce: khris-tos'
Origin: from 5548
, to them that have obtained
lagchano (Greek #2975)
to lot, i.e. determine (by implication, receive) especially by lot
KJV usage: his lot be, cast lots, obtain.
Pronounce: lang-khan'-o
Origin: a prolonged form of a primary verb, which is only used as an alternate in certain tenses
likea precious
isotimos (Greek #2472)
of equal value or honor
KJV usage: like precious.
Pronounce: ee-sot'-ee-mos
Origin: from 2470 and 5092
faith
pistis (Greek #4102)
persuasion, i.e. credence; moral conviction (of religious truth, or the truthfulness of God or a religious teacher), especially reliance upon Christ for salvation; abstractly, constancy in such profession; by extension, the system of religious (Gospel) truth itself
KJV usage: assurance, belief, believe, faith, fidelity.
Pronounce: pis'-tis
Origin: from 3982
with us
hemin (Greek #2254)
to (or for, with, by) us
KJV usage: our, (for) us, we.
Pronounce: hay-meen'
Origin: dative case plural of 1473
through
en (Greek #1722)
"in," at, (up-)on, by, etc.
KJV usage: about, after, against, + almost, X altogether, among, X as, at, before, between, (here-)by (+ all means), for (... sake of), + give self wholly to, (here-)in(-to, -wardly), X mightily, (because) of, (up-)on, (open-)ly, X outwardly, one, X quickly, X shortly, (speedi-)ly, X that, X there(-in, -on), through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), under, when, where(-with), while, with(-in). Often used in compounds, with substantially the same import; rarely with verbs of motion, and then not to indicate direction, except (elliptically) by a separate (and different) preposition.
Pronounce: en
Origin: a primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), i.e. a relation of rest (intermediate between 1519 and 1537)
the righteousness
dikaiosune (Greek #1343)
equity (of character or act); specially (Christian) justification
KJV usage: righteousness.
Pronounce: dik-ah-yos-oo'-nay
Origin: from 1342
of γGod
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
theos (Greek #2316)
a deity, especially (with 3588) the supreme Divinity; figuratively, a magistrate; by Hebraism, very
KJV usage: X exceeding, God, god(-ly, -ward).
Pronounce: theh'-os
Origin: of uncertain affinity
*
hemon (Greek #2257)
of (or from) us
KJV usage: our (company), us, we.
Pronounce: hay-mone'
Origin: genitive case plural of 1473
and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
our
hemon (Greek #2257)
of (or from) us
KJV usage: our (company), us, we.
Pronounce: hay-mone'
Origin: genitive case plural of 1473
Saviour
soter (Greek #4990)
a deliverer, i.e. God or Christ
KJV usage: saviour.
Pronounce: so-tare'
Origin: from 4982
Jesus
Iesous (Greek #2424)
Jesus (i.e. Jehoshua), the name of our Lord and two (three) other Israelites
KJV usage: Jesus.
Pronounce: ee-ay-sooce'
Origin: of Hebrew origin (03091)
Christ
Christos (Greek #5547)
anointed, i.e. the Messiah, an epithet of Jesus
KJV usage: Christ.
Pronounce: khris-tos'
Origin: from 5548
:

Cross References

+

Ministry on This Verse

+
1-4:  Confirming them in hope of the increase of God's graces,
5-11:  he exhorts them, by faith, and good works, to make their calling sure;
12-15:  whereof he is careful to remind them, knowing that his death is at hand;
16-21:  and warns them to be constant in the faith of Christ, who is the true Son of God, by the eyewitness of the apostles beholding his majesty, and by the testimony of the Father, and the prophets.
Simon.
or, Symeon.
Peter.
Matt. 4:18• 18And Jesus, walking by the sea of Galilee, saw two brethren, Simon called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea: for they were fishers. (Matt. 4:18)
;
Matt. 10:2• 2Now the names of the twelve apostles are these; The first, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother; James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother; (Matt. 10:2)
;
Luke 22:31‑34• 31And the Lord said, Simon, Simon, behold, Satan hath desired to have you, that he may sift you as wheat:
32But I have prayed for thee, that thy faith fail not: and when thou art converted, strengthen thy brethren.
33And he said unto him, Lord, I am ready to go with thee, both into prison, and to death.
34And he said, I tell thee, Peter, the cock shall not crow this day, before that thou shalt thrice deny that thou knowest me.
(Luke 22:31‑34)
;
John 1:42• 42And he brought him to Jesus. And when Jesus beheld him, he said, Thou art Simon the son of Jona: thou shalt be called Cephas, which is by interpretation, A stone. (John 1:42)
;
John 21:15‑17• 15So when they had dined, Jesus saith to Simon Peter, Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me more than these? He saith unto him, Yea, Lord; thou knowest that I love thee. He saith unto him, Feed my lambs.
16He saith to him again the second time, Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me? He saith unto him, Yea, Lord; thou knowest that I love thee. He saith unto him, Feed my sheep.
17He saith unto him the third time, Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me? Peter was grieved because he said unto him the third time, Lovest thou me? And he said unto him, Lord, thou knowest all things; thou knowest that I love thee. Jesus saith unto him, Feed my sheep.
(John 21:15‑17)
;
1 Peter 1:1• 1Peter, an apostle of Jesus Christ, to the strangers scattered throughout Pontus, Galatia, Cappadocia, Asia, and Bithynia, (1 Peter 1:1)
a servant.
an apostle.
have.
2 Peter 1:4• 4Whereby are given unto us exceeding great and precious promises: that by these ye might be partakers of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world through lust. (2 Peter 1:4)
;
Acts 15:8‑9• 8And God, which knoweth the hearts, bare them witness, giving them the Holy Ghost, even as he did unto us;
9And put no difference between us and them, purifying their hearts by faith.
(Acts 15:8‑9)
;
Rom. 1:12• 12That is, that I may be comforted together with you by the mutual faith both of you and me. (Rom. 1:12)
;
2 Cor. 4:13• 13We having the same spirit of faith, according as it is written, I believed, and therefore have I spoken; we also believe, and therefore speak; (2 Cor. 4:13)
;
Eph. 4:5• 5One Lord, one faith, one baptism, (Eph. 4:5)
;
Phil. 1:29• 29For unto you it is given in the behalf of Christ, not only to believe on him, but also to suffer for his sake; (Phil. 1:29)
;
2 Tim. 1:5• 5When I call to remembrance the unfeigned faith that is in thee, which dwelt first in thy grandmother Lois, and thy mother Eunice; and I am persuaded that in thee also. (2 Tim. 1:5)
;
Titus 1:1,4• 1Paul, a servant of God, and an apostle of Jesus Christ, according to the faith of God's elect, and the acknowledging of the truth which is after godliness;
4To Titus, mine own son after the common faith: Grace, mercy, and peace, from God the Father and the Lord Jesus Christ our Saviour.
(Titus 1:1,4)
;
1 Peter 1:7• 7That the trial of your faith, being much more precious than of gold that perisheth, though it be tried with fire, might be found unto praise and honor and glory at the appearing of Jesus Christ: (1 Peter 1:7)
;
1 Peter 2:7• 7Unto you therefore which believe he is precious: but unto them which be disobedient, the stone which the builders disallowed, the same is made the head of the corner, (1 Peter 2:7)
through.
Jer. 33:16• 16In those days shall Judah be saved, and Jerusalem shall dwell safely: and this is the name wherewith she shall be called, The Lord our righteousness. (Jer. 33:16)
;
Rom. 1:17• 17For therein is the righteousness of God revealed from faith to faith: as it is written, The just shall live by faith. (Rom. 1:17)
;
Rom. 3:21‑26• 21But now the righteousness of God without the law is manifested, being witnessed by the law and the prophets;
22Even the righteousness of God which is by faith of Jesus Christ unto all and upon all them that believe: for there is no difference:
23For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God;
24Being justified freely by his grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus:
25Whom God hath set forth to be a propitiation through faith in his blood, to declare his righteousness for the remission of sins that are past, through the forbearance of God;
26To declare, I say, at this time his righteousness: that he might be just, and the justifier of him which believeth in Jesus.
(Rom. 3:21‑26)
;
1 Cor. 1:30• 30But of him are ye in Christ Jesus, who of God is made unto us wisdom, and righteousness, and sanctification, and redemption: (1 Cor. 1:30)
;
2 Cor. 5:21• 21For he hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him. (2 Cor. 5:21)
;
Phil. 3:9• 9And be found in him, not having mine own righteousness, which is of the law, but that which is through the faith of Christ, the righteousness which is of God by faith: (Phil. 3:9)
of God and our Saviour.
Gr. of our God and Saviour.
 the confession of absolute subjection to his Master conveyed in "bondman." Paul loved so to call himself, and Jude, and John. (“2 Peter” by W. Kelly)
 To be somebody is the desire of fallen man, the world's spirit; to give up all in love and obedience is Christ's, who alone really had all things. It is our pattern now. Greatness according to Him is to be a true servant (“2 Peter” by W. Kelly)
 "Like precious faith" raises no question of measure of faith in those who believe, but asserts that what is believed is equally precious for the simplest Christian as for an apostle, in its source, agent, object, and result. (“2 Peter” by W. Kelly)
 in our text it is not the believer obtaining God's righteousness through faith, but obtaining faith by the righteousness of their God and Saviour Jesus Christ*: a quite different truth, and peculiar to the remnant which God ever has in Israel. (“2 Peter” by W. Kelly)

J. N. Darby Translation

+
1
Simon Peter, bondman and apostle of Jesus Christ, to them that have received like precious faith with us through the righteousness of our God and Saviour Jesus Christ:

W. Kelly Translation

+
1
aSimon Peter, bondman and apostle of Jesus Christ to them that obtained like precious faith with us in virtue of [the] righteousness of our God and Saviour Jesus Christ:

WK Translation Notes

+
a
Simon: Yet on its face the writer declares himself with yet more carefulness than when he wrote before, not "Peter" only but "Symeon Peter," name and surname. So, at the Jerusalem conference on the Gentile question, James speaks of him (Acts 15:14) as "Symeon" (the Aramaic form of "Simon"), though historically designated "Peter" just before (ver. 7). A forger would have strenuously avoided any such shade of difference, superficial though it be; as he never would have conceived still greater care to attest thus minutely the Peter who added this Second Epistle. (Epist. of Peter, Part 2, p. 3)
^ bondman... [the]: no notice is taken [by the American correctors of the RV] of that common fault in the Revisers, the needless enfeebling indefinite article of ours twice over. Our tongue does not require "a" before "servant" or "bondman"; yet it seems harsh to omit in English "the" before "righteousness," though Mr. Green does so. (Bible Treasury 15:80)
in virtue of: 2 Peter 1:1 does not touch on the ground of justification, but asserts that the saints he addressed obtained like precious faith with the apostles, in virtue of the righteousness of God and our Saviour Jesus Christ. Even if we adopt the marginal suggestion, it would mean that our God and Saviour Jesus Christ took care, according to His faithful regard to the promises, that there should ever be a remnant according to the election of grace. Hence He, in His righteousness, secured that they should get faith. Christ's law-keeping is not a question: introduce it, and you spoil the sense. For how could His legal obedience bring any one to faith? But verse 2 confirms the English Bible against the margin. If the former be correct, there would be no possible place for the desired result; for nobody believes that God and Jesus kept the law either to make up a legal righteousness for others, or to give them faith. The later Puritans were the chief promoters, though not the authors, of the scheme which conceives our justification to consist of Christ's observance of the law imputed to us; but even their chief theologian, Dr. John Owen, renounced the sense which modern Evangelicals try to fasten on 2 Peter 1:1. (Bible Treasury 20:281)
in virtue of: [The RV] has the great defect of an equivocal or erroneous rendering of ἐν (that frequent stumblingblock of the Revisers), and this in a text so much the more important as it is often pressed dogmatically, not seldom wrongly, owing to this very error. I do not dwell on "a" more than once used needlessly here, as this has been frequently noticed elsewhere; but "faith with us in the righteousness" suggests in our idiom the object believed in. This is not the aim of the passage. The Apostle means that the Christian Jews, to whom he is for the second time addressing himself, obtained like precious faith with us "your apostles" (3:2) in virtue of (or through) the righteousness of our God and Saviour Jesus Christ; as the Revisers rightly give the last words in their text, though not in the margin. There were special promises to the fathers about the blessing of their seed, and God was righteous in fulfilling them. There has always been a believing remnant of that people, if of no other continuously. Jesus, not more truly man than the Lord God of Israel, has been faithful to that word of distinguishing favor; and if those Jews to whom Peter was writing received faith, like precious faith with the apostles, it was in virtue of His making good the promise to them and their children by giving them to believe. Such is the righteousness here meant. Hence "through" in the Authorized Version is substantially correct, as being less ambiguous than "in" of the Revised Version, which is apt to mislead by suggesting His righteousness as the thing believed in, instead of pointing out His fidelity to promise in bestowing faith on them. (Bible Treasury 14:94)
in virtue of: "In" the righteousness might mislead, because here it would tend to convey the idea of righteousness as the object of faith, according to a favorite dream of Calvinistic theology, which is in no way meant, as even the Puritan Dr. John Owen candidly acknowledges. (So it is in the misreading of the Sinaitic MS. Εἰς δ. and in some Latin copies, contrary to the unquestionable stream of testimony.) God was righteous in giving them faith no less precious than the apostles' according to His promise to the fathers. "By" in the Geneva V. is legitimate, or even "through," though this last might be taken as the mere means διά; whereas it is their God and Saviour's fidelity to His word, in virtue of which He secured their believing. If "in" were thus understood, it would be all right, as in ver. 2, where the form of the phrase is not quite the same as in 1 and is correctly given in almost all versions. (Bible Treasury 15:80)
and ^: [The American correctors of the RV] prefer marg. [of the RV] to the text, and therefore would have them exchange places. Is not this a singular choice? Even G. Wakefield, heterodox as he was, translated as the Revisers. No scholar who has adequately weighed the construction contests that the omission of the second article admits of two persons strictly united in joint agency, where the phrase does not describe a single person. Contextual scope must decide which is intended; but even where it is a unity of two before the mind rather than one person, which is expressed by the one common article, the phrase seems impossible unless both stood on precisely the same platform of nature or position. Now I am disposed to believe that in the Epistles of Peter, as in that to the Hebrews, the inspired writer meant to strengthen those addressed in the great truth that Jesus was the Jehovah of Israel, the true God, no less than the Father. (Bible Treasury 15:79-80)