Acts 13:25 KJV (With Strong’s)

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25
And
de (Greek #1161)
but, and, etc.
KJV usage: also, and, but, moreover, now (often unexpressed in English).
Pronounce: deh
Origin: a primary particle (adversative or continuative)
as
hos (Greek #5613)
which how, i.e. in that manner (very variously used, as follows)
KJV usage: about, after (that), (according) as (it had been, it were), as soon (as), even as (like), for, how (greatly), like (as, unto), since, so (that), that, to wit, unto, when(-soever), while, X with all speed.
Pronounce: hoce
Origin: probably adverb of comparative from 3739
John
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
Ioannes (Greek #2491)
Joannes (i.e. Jochanan), the name of four Israelites
KJV usage: John.
Pronounce: ee-o-an'-nace
Origin: of Hebrew origin (03110)
fulfilled
pleroo (Greek #4137)
to make replete, i.e. (literally) to cram (a net), level up (a hollow), or (figuratively) to furnish (or imbue, diffuse, influence), satisfy, execute (an office), finish (a period or task), verify (or coincide with a prediction), etc.
KJV usage: accomplish, X after, (be) complete, end, expire, fill (up), fulfil, (be, make) full (come), fully preach, perfect, supply.
Pronounce: play-ro'-o
Origin: from 4134
his course
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
dromos (Greek #1408)
a race, i.e. (figuratively) career
KJV usage: course.
Pronounce: drom'-os
Origin: from the alternate of 5143
, he said
lego (Greek #3004)
properly, to "lay" forth, i.e. (figuratively) relate (in words (usually of systematic or set discourse; whereas 2036 and 5346 generally refer to an individual expression or speech respectively; while 4483 is properly to break silence merely, and 2980 means an extended or random harangue)); by implication, to mean
KJV usage: ask, bid, boast, call, describe, give out, name, put forth, say(-ing, on), shew, speak, tell, utter.
Pronounce: leg'-o
Origin: a primary verb
, Whom
tis (Greek #5101)
an interrogative pronoun, who, which or what (in direct or indirect questions)
KJV usage: every man, how (much), + no(-ne, thing), what (manner, thing), where (-by, -fore, -of, -unto, - with, -withal), whether, which, who(-m, -se), why.
Pronounce: tis
Origin: probably emphatic of 5100
think ye that
huponoeo (Greek #5282)
to think under (privately), i.e. to surmise or conjecture
KJV usage: think, suppose, deem.
Pronounce: hoop-on-o-eh'-o
Origin: from 5259 and 3539
I
me (Greek #3165)
me
KJV usage: I, me, my.
Pronounce: meh
Origin: a shorter (and probably originally) form of 1691
am
einai (Greek #1511)
to exist
KJV usage: am, was. come, is, X lust after, X please well, there is, to be, was.
Pronounce: i'-nahee
Origin: present infinitive from 1510
? I
ego (Greek #1473)
a primary pronoun of the first person I (only expressed when emphatic)
KJV usage: I, me. For the other cases and the plural see 1691, 1698, 1700, 2248, 2249, 2254, 2257, etc.
Pronounce: eg-o'
am
eimi (Greek #1510)
a prolonged form of a primary and defective verb; I exist (used only when emphatic)
KJV usage: am, have been, X it is I, was. See also 1488, 1498, 1511, 1527, 2258, 2071, 2070, 2075, 2076, 2771, 2468, 5600.
Pronounce: i-mee'
Origin: the first person singular present indicative
not
ou (Greek #3756)
the absolute negative (compare 3361) adverb; no or not
KJV usage: + long, nay, neither, never, no (X man), none, (can-)not, + nothing, + special, un(-worthy), when, + without, + yet but. See also 3364, 3372.
Pronounce: oo
Origin: οὐκ (ook), and (before an aspirate) οὐχ (ookh) a primary word
he. But
alla (Greek #235)
properly, other things, i.e. (adverbially) contrariwise (in many relations)
KJV usage: and, but (even), howbeit, indeed, nay, nevertheless, no, notwithstanding, save, therefore, yea, yet.
Pronounce: al-lah'
Origin: neuter plural of 243
, behold
idou (Greek #2400)
second person singular imperative middle voice of 1492; used as imperative lo!; --behold, lo, see.
Pronounce: id-oo'
, there cometh one
erchomai (Greek #2064)
middle voice of a primary verb (used only in the present and imperfect tenses, the others being supplied by a kindred (middle voice) ἐλεύθομαι (el-yoo'-thom-ahee), or (active) ἔλθω (el'-tho), which do not otherwise occur) to come or go (in a great variety of applications, literally and figuratively)
KJV usage: accompany, appear, bring, come, enter, fall out, go, grow, X light, X next, pass, resort, be set.
Pronounce: er'-khom-ahee
after
meta (Greek #3326)
properly, denoting accompaniment; "amid" (local or causal); modified variously according to the case (genitive association, or accusative succession) with which it is joined; occupying an intermediate position between 575 or 1537 and 1519 or 4314; less intimate than 1722 and less close than 4862)
KJV usage: after(-ward), X that he again, against, among, X and, + follow, hence, hereafter, in, of, (up-)on, + our, X and setting, since, (un-)to, + together, when, with (+ -out). Often used in composition, in substantially the same relations of participation or proximity, and transfer or sequence.
Pronounce: met-ah'
Origin: a primary preposition (often used adverbially)
me
eme (Greek #1691)
me
KJV usage: I, me, my(-self).
Pronounce: em-eh'
Origin: a prolonged form of 3165
, whose
hos (Greek #3739)
the relatively (sometimes demonstrative) pronoun, who, which, what, that
KJV usage: one, (an-, the) other, some, that, what, which, who(-m, -se), etc. See also 3757.
Pronounce: hos
Origin: ἥ (hay), and neuter ὅ (ho) probably a primary word (or perhaps a form of the article 3588)
shoes
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
hupodema (Greek #5266)
something bound under the feet, i.e. a shoe or sandal
KJV usage: shoe.
Pronounce: hoop-od'-ay-mah
Origin: from 5265
of
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
pous (Greek #4228)
a "foot" (figuratively or literally)
KJV usage: foot(-stool).
Pronounce: pooce
Origin: a primary word
his feet
pous (Greek #4228)
a "foot" (figuratively or literally)
KJV usage: foot(-stool).
Pronounce: pooce
Origin: a primary word
I am
eimi (Greek #1510)
a prolonged form of a primary and defective verb; I exist (used only when emphatic)
KJV usage: am, have been, X it is I, was. See also 1488, 1498, 1511, 1527, 2258, 2071, 2070, 2075, 2076, 2771, 2468, 5600.
Pronounce: i-mee'
Origin: the first person singular present indicative
not
ou (Greek #3756)
the absolute negative (compare 3361) adverb; no or not
KJV usage: + long, nay, neither, never, no (X man), none, (can-)not, + nothing, + special, un(-worthy), when, + without, + yet but. See also 3364, 3372.
Pronounce: oo
Origin: οὐκ (ook), and (before an aspirate) οὐχ (ookh) a primary word
worthy
axios (Greek #514)
deserving, comparable or suitable (as if drawing praise)
KJV usage: due reward, meet, (un-)worthy.
Pronounce: ax'-ee-os
Origin: probably from 71
to loose
luo (Greek #3089)
to "loosen" (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: break (up), destroy, dissolve, (un-)loose, melt, put off. Compare 4486.
Pronounce: loo'-o
Origin: a primary verb
.

Cross References

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fulfilled.
Acts 13:36• 36For David, after he had served his own generation by the will of God, fell on sleep, and was laid unto his fathers, and saw corruption: (Acts 13:36)
;
Acts 20:24• 24But none of these things move me, neither count I my life dear unto myself, so that I might finish my course with joy, and the ministry, which I have received of the Lord Jesus, to testify the gospel of the grace of God. (Acts 20:24)
;
Mark 6:16‑28• 16But when Herod heard thereof, he said, It is John, whom I beheaded: he is risen from the dead.
17For Herod himself had sent forth and laid hold upon John, and bound him in prison for Herodias' sake, his brother Philip's wife: for he had married her.
18For John had said unto Herod, It is not lawful for thee to have thy brother's wife.
19Therefore Herodias had a quarrel against him, and would have killed him; but she could not:
20For Herod feared John, knowing that he was a just man and an holy, and observed him; and when he heard him, he did many things, and heard him gladly.
21And when a convenient day was come, that Herod on his birthday made a supper to his lords, high captains, and chief estates of Galilee;
22And when the daughter of the said Herodias came in, and danced, and pleased Herod and them that sat with him, the king said unto the damsel, Ask of me whatsoever thou wilt, and I will give it thee.
23And he sware unto her, Whatsoever thou shalt ask of me, I will give it thee, unto the half of my kingdom.
24And she went forth, and said unto her mother, What shall I ask? And she said, The head of John the Baptist.
25And she came in straightway with haste unto the king, and asked, saying, I will that thou give me by and by in a charger the head of John the Baptist.
26And the king was exceeding sorry; yet for his oath's sake, and for their sakes which sat with him, he would not reject her.
27And immediately the king sent an executioner, and commanded his head to be brought: and he went and beheaded him in the prison,
28And brought his head in a charger, and gave it to the damsel: and the damsel gave it to her mother.
(Mark 6:16‑28)
;
John 4:34• 34Jesus saith unto them, My meat is to do the will of him that sent me, and to finish his work. (John 4:34)
;
John 19:28‑30• 28After this, Jesus knowing that all things were now accomplished, that the scripture might be fulfilled, saith, I thirst.
29Now there was set a vessel full of vinegar: and they filled a spunge with vinegar, and put it upon hyssop, and put it to his mouth.
30When Jesus therefore had received the vinegar, he said, It is finished: and he bowed his head, and gave up the ghost.
(John 19:28‑30)
;
2 Tim. 4:7• 7I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith: (2 Tim. 4:7)
;
Rev. 11:7• 7And when they shall have finished their testimony, the beast that ascendeth out of the bottomless pit shall make war against them, and shall overcome them, and kill them. (Rev. 11:7)
whom.
Acts 19:4• 4Then said Paul, John verily baptized with the baptism of repentance, saying unto the people, that they should believe on him which should come after him, that is, on Christ Jesus. (Acts 19:4)
;
Matt. 3:11• 11I indeed baptize you with water unto repentance: but he that cometh after me is mightier than I, whose shoes I am not worthy to bear: he shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost, and with fire: (Matt. 3:11)
;
Mark 1:7• 7And preached, saying, There cometh one mightier than I after me, the latchet of whose shoes I am not worthy to stoop down and unloose. (Mark 1:7)
;
Luke 3:15‑16• 15And as the people were in expectation, and all men mused in their hearts of John, whether he were the Christ, or not;
16John answered, saying unto them all, I indeed baptize you with water; but one mightier than I cometh, the latchet of whose shoes I am not worthy to unloose: he shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost and with fire:
(Luke 3:15‑16)
;
John 1:20‑23,26‑27,29,34,36• 20And he confessed, and denied not; but confessed, I am not the Christ.
21And they asked him, What then? Art thou Elias? And he saith, I am not. Art thou that prophet? And he answered, No.
22Then said they unto him, Who art thou? that we may give an answer to them that sent us. What sayest thou of thyself?
23He said, I am the voice of one crying in the wilderness, Make straight the way of the Lord, as said the prophet Esaias.
26John answered them, saying, I baptize with water: but there standeth one among you, whom ye know not;
27He it is, who coming after me is preferred before me, whose shoe's latchet I am not worthy to unloose.
29The next day John seeth Jesus coming unto him, and saith, Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world.
34And I saw, and bare record that this is the Son of God.
36And looking upon Jesus as he walked, he saith, Behold the Lamb of God!
(John 1:20‑23,26‑27,29,34,36)
;
John 3:27‑29• 27John answered and said, A man can receive nothing, except it be given him from heaven.
28Ye yourselves bear me witness, that I said, I am not the Christ, but that I am sent before him.
29He that hath the bride is the bridegroom: but the friend of the bridegroom, which standeth and heareth him, rejoiceth greatly because of the bridegroom's voice: this my joy therefore is fulfilled.
(John 3:27‑29)
;
John 7:18• 18He that speaketh of himself seeketh his own glory: but he that seeketh his glory that sent him, the same is true, and no unrighteousness is in him. (John 7:18)
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2 Cor. 4:5• 5For we preach not ourselves, but Christ Jesus the Lord; and ourselves your servants for Jesus' sake. (2 Cor. 4:5)

J. N. Darby Translation

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25
And as John was fulfilling his course he said, Whom do ye suppose that I am? *I* am not he. But behold, there comes one after me, the sandal of whose feet I am not worthy to loose.

W. Kelly Translation

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25
aAnd as John was fulfilling his course, he said, What suppose ye that I am? I am not [he], but behold, there cometh one after me the sandal of whose feet I am not worthy to loose.

WK Translation Notes

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a
What suppose ye that I am? I am not: Y.E.N.E. will perhaps be gratified to hear that Dr. Tischendorf has edited this verse as he suggests [i.e. "Whom ye think I am, I am not."], Τίνα με ὐπονοεῖτε εἶναι, οὐκ εἰμὶ ἐγώ. Luther had evidently so taken the clause, "Ich bin nicht der, dafür ihr mich haltet," following the Latin, probably. Raphelius and Wolf contended, one for, and the other against, this construction: so that I think your Querist may be assured that the Greek will bear it, though it is somewhat unusual. There can be no doubt that in profane authors τίς is sometimes used for ὅστις in oratio obliqua after verbs expressive of a doubt, question, or the like, and this not merely with the optative, but where the verb of the indirect question passes into the indicative. Compare Xen.An.iii.3-18, ed. Schneider. Tischendorf also gives τίς σοφός, αὐτῷ ποσκολλήθητι (Sap.Sir.vi.34), while Valpy has τίς σοφός. from the edition of Holmes and Bos. Without pretending what is happily an insignificant question, for the sense either way is substantially alike, I do not go too far in concluding that the interrogative force is not so universal but that a relative sense is possible. (Christian Annotator 2:352)