Acts 20:7 KJV (With Strong’s)

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7
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ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
And
en (Greek #1722)
"in," at, (up-)on, by, etc.
KJV usage: about, after, against, + almost, X altogether, among, X as, at, before, between, (here-)by (+ all means), for (... sake of), + give self wholly to, (here-)in(-to, -wardly), X mightily, (because) of, (up-)on, (open-)ly, X outwardly, one, X quickly, X shortly, (speedi-)ly, X that, X there(-in, -on), through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), under, when, where(-with), while, with(-in). Often used in compounds, with substantially the same import; rarely with verbs of motion, and then not to indicate direction, except (elliptically) by a separate (and different) preposition.
Pronounce: en
Origin: a primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), i.e. a relation of rest (intermediate between 1519 and 1537)
upon
de (Greek #1161)
but, and, etc.
KJV usage: also, and, but, moreover, now (often unexpressed in English).
Pronounce: deh
Origin: a primary particle (adversative or continuative)
the first
heis (Greek #1520)
a primary numeral; one
KJV usage: a(-n, -ny, certain), + abundantly, man, one (another), only, other, some. See also 1527, 3367, 3391, 3762.
Pronounce: hice
Origin: (including the neuter (etc.) ἕν)
d day of the week
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
sabbaton (Greek #4521)
the Sabbath (i.e. Shabbath), or day of weekly repose from secular avocations (also the observance or institution itself); by extension, a se'nnight, i.e. the interval between two Sabbaths; likewise the plural in all the above applications
KJV usage: sabbath (day), week.
Pronounce: sab'-bat-on
Origin: of Hebrew origin (07676)
, when
sunago (Greek #4863)
to lead together, i.e. collect or convene; specially, to entertain (hospitably)
KJV usage: + accompany, assemble (selves, together), bestow, come together, gather (selves together, up, together), lead into, resort, take in.
Pronounce: soon-ag'-o
Origin: from 4862 and 71
the disciples
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
mathetes (Greek #3101)
a learner, i.e. pupil
KJV usage: disciple.
Pronounce: math-ay-tes'
Origin: from 3129
came together
sunago (Greek #4863)
to lead together, i.e. collect or convene; specially, to entertain (hospitably)
KJV usage: + accompany, assemble (selves, together), bestow, come together, gather (selves together, up, together), lead into, resort, take in.
Pronounce: soon-ag'-o
Origin: from 4862 and 71
to break
klao (Greek #2806)
to break (specially, of bread)
KJV usage: break.
Pronounce: klah'-o
Origin: a primary verb
bread
artos (Greek #740)
bread (as raised) or a loaf
KJV usage: (shew-)bread, loaf.
Pronounce: ar'-tos
Origin: from 142
f, Paul
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
Paulos (Greek #3972)
(little; but remotely from a derivative of 3973, meaning the same); Paulus, the name of a Roman and of an apostle
KJV usage: Paul, Paulus.
Pronounce: pow'-los
Origin: of Latin origin
preached
dialegomai (Greek #1256)
to say thoroughly, i.e. discuss (in argument or exhortation)
KJV usage: dispute, preach (unto), reason (with), speak.
Pronounce: dee-al-eg'-om-ahee
Origin: middle voice from 1223 and 3004
unto them
autos (Greek #846)
the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the comparative 1438) of the third person , and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons
KJV usage: her, it(-self), one, the other, (mine) own, said, (self-), the) same, ((him-, my-, thy- )self, (your-)selves, she, that, their(-s), them(-selves), there(-at, - by, -in, -into, -of, -on, -with), they, (these) things, this (man), those, together, very, which. Compare 848.
Pronounce: ow-tos'
Origin: from the particle αὖ (perhaps akin to the base of 109 through the idea of a baffling wind) (backward)
, ready
mello (Greek #3195)
to intend, i.e. be about to be, do, or suffer something (of persons or things, especially events; in the sense of purpose, duty, necessity, probability, possibility, or hesitation)
KJV usage: about, after that, be (almost), (that which is, things, + which was for) to come, intend, was to (be), mean, mind, be at the point, (be) ready, + return, shall (begin), (which, that) should (after, afterwards, hereafter) tarry, which was for, will, would, be yet.
Pronounce: mel'-lo
Origin: a strengthened form of 3199 (through the idea of expectation)
to depart
exeimi (Greek #1826)
to issue, i.e. leave (a place), escape (to the shore)
KJV usage: depart, get (to land), go out.
Pronounce: ex'-i-mee
Origin: from 1537 and εἶμι (to go)
on the morrow
epaurion (Greek #1887)
occurring on the succeeding day, i.e. (2250 being implied) to-morrow
KJV usage: day following, morrow, next day (after).
Pronounce: ep-ow'-ree-on
Origin: from 1909 and 839
; and
te (Greek #5037)
both or also (properly, as correlation of 2532)
KJV usage: also, and, both, even, then, whether. Often used in composition, usually as the latter participle.
Pronounce: teh
Origin: a primary particle (enclitic) of connection or addition
continued
parateino (Greek #3905)
to extend along, i.e. prolong (in point of time)
KJV usage: continue.
Pronounce: par-at-i'-no
Origin: from 3844 and teino (to stretch)
his speech
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
logos (Greek #3056)
something said (including the thought); by implication, a topic (subject of discourse), also reasoning (the mental faculty) or motive; by extension, a computation; specially, (with the article in John) the Divine Expression (i.e. Christ)
KJV usage: account, cause, communication, X concerning, doctrine, fame, X have to do, intent, matter, mouth, preaching, question, reason, + reckon, remove, say(-ing), shew, X speaker, speech, talk, thing, + none of these things move me, tidings, treatise, utterance, word, work.
Pronounce: log'-os
Origin: from 3004
until
mechri (Greek #3360)
as far as, i.e. up to a certain point (as a preposition, of extent (denoting the terminus, whereas 891 refers especially to the space of time or place intervening) or conjunction)
KJV usage: till, (un-)to, until.
Pronounce: mekh'-ree
Origin: or μεχρίς (mekh-ris') from 3372
midnight
mesonuktion (Greek #3317)
midnight (especially as a watch)
KJV usage: midnight.
Pronounce: mes-on-ook'-tee-on
Origin: neuter of compound of 3319 and 3571
.
f
Acts 2:42,46• 42And they persevered in the teaching and fellowship of the apostles, in breaking of bread and prayers.
46And every day, being constantly in the temple with one accord, and breaking bread in the house, they received their food with gladness and simplicity of heart,
(Acts 2:42,46)
;
1 Cor. 10:16• 16The cup of blessing which we bless, is it not the communion of the blood of the Christ? The bread which we break, is it not the communion of the body of the Christ? (1 Cor. 10:16)
;
1 Cor. 11:20‑34• 20When ye come therefore together into one place, it is not to eat the Lord's supper.
21For each one in eating takes his *own* supper before others, and one is hungry and another drinks to excess.
22Have ye not then houses for eating and drinking? or do ye despise the assembly of God, and put to shame them who have not? What shall I say to you? shall I praise you? In this point I do not praise.
23For *I* received from the Lord, that which I also delivered to you, that the Lord Jesus, in the night in which he was delivered up, took bread,
24and having given thanks broke it, and said, This is my body, which is for you: this do in remembrance of me.
25In like manner also the cup, after having supped, saying, This cup is the new covenant in my blood: this do, as often as ye shall drink it, in remembrance of me.
26For as often as ye shall eat this bread, and drink the cup, ye announce the death of the Lord, until he come.
27So that whosoever shall eat the bread, or drink the cup of the Lord, unworthily, shall be guilty in respect of the body and of the blood of the Lord.
28But let a man prove himself, and thus eat of the bread, and drink of the cup.
29For the eater and drinker eats and drinks judgment to himself, not distinguishing the body.
30On this account many among you are weak and infirm, and a good many are fallen asleep.
31But if we judged ourselves, so were we not judged.
32But being judged, we are disciplined of the Lord, that we may not be condemned with the world.
33So that, my brethren, when ye come together to eat, wait for one another.
34If any one be hungry, let him eat at home, that ye may not come together for judgment. But the other things, whenever I come, I will set in order.
(1 Cor. 11:20‑34)

More on:

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Cross References

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the first.
the disciples.
to break.
Acts 20:11• 11And having gone up, and having broken the bread, and eaten, and having long spoken until daybreak, so he went away. (Acts 20:11)
;
Acts 2:42,46• 42And they persevered in the teaching and fellowship of the apostles, in breaking of bread and prayers.
46And every day, being constantly in the temple with one accord, and breaking bread in the house, they received their food with gladness and simplicity of heart,
(Acts 2:42,46)
;
Luke 22:19• 19And having taken a loaf, when he had given thanks, he broke it, and gave it to them, saying, This is my body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me. (Luke 22:19)
;
Luke 24:35• 35And they related what had happened on the way, and how he was made known to them in the breaking of bread. (Luke 24:35)
;
1 Cor. 10:16• 16The cup of blessing which we bless, is it not the communion of the blood of the Christ? The bread which we break, is it not the communion of the body of the Christ? (1 Cor. 10:16)
;
1 Cor. 11:20‑34• 20When ye come therefore together into one place, it is not to eat the Lord's supper.
21For each one in eating takes his *own* supper before others, and one is hungry and another drinks to excess.
22Have ye not then houses for eating and drinking? or do ye despise the assembly of God, and put to shame them who have not? What shall I say to you? shall I praise you? In this point I do not praise.
23For *I* received from the Lord, that which I also delivered to you, that the Lord Jesus, in the night in which he was delivered up, took bread,
24and having given thanks broke it, and said, This is my body, which is for you: this do in remembrance of me.
25In like manner also the cup, after having supped, saying, This cup is the new covenant in my blood: this do, as often as ye shall drink it, in remembrance of me.
26For as often as ye shall eat this bread, and drink the cup, ye announce the death of the Lord, until he come.
27So that whosoever shall eat the bread, or drink the cup of the Lord, unworthily, shall be guilty in respect of the body and of the blood of the Lord.
28But let a man prove himself, and thus eat of the bread, and drink of the cup.
29For the eater and drinker eats and drinks judgment to himself, not distinguishing the body.
30On this account many among you are weak and infirm, and a good many are fallen asleep.
31But if we judged ourselves, so were we not judged.
32But being judged, we are disciplined of the Lord, that we may not be condemned with the world.
33So that, my brethren, when ye come together to eat, wait for one another.
34If any one be hungry, let him eat at home, that ye may not come together for judgment. But the other things, whenever I come, I will set in order.
(1 Cor. 11:20‑34)
and continued.
Acts 20:9,11,31• 9And a certain youth, by name Eutychus, sitting at the window-opening, overpowered by deep sleep, while Paul discoursed very much at length, having been overpowered by the sleep, fell from the third story down to the bottom, and was taken up dead.
11And having gone up, and having broken the bread, and eaten, and having long spoken until daybreak, so he went away.
31Wherefore watch, remembering that for three years, night and day, I ceased not admonishing each one of you with tears.
(Acts 20:9,11,31)
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Acts 28:23• 23And having appointed him a day many came to him to the lodging, to whom he expounded, testifying of the kingdom of God, and persuading them concerning Jesus, both from the law of Moses and the prophets, from early morning to evening. (Acts 28:23)
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Neh. 8:3• 3And he read in it before the open place that was before the water-gate from the morning until midday, in presence of the men and the women, and those that could understand. And the ears of all the people were attentive to the book of the law. (Neh. 8:3)
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Neh. 9:3• 3And they stood up in their place, and read in the book of the law of Jehovah their God a fourth part of the day; and a fourth part they confessed, and worshipped Jehovah their God. (Neh. 9:3)
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1 Cor. 15:10• 10But by God's grace I am what I am; and his grace, which was towards me, has not been vain; but I have laboured more abundantly than they all, but not *I*, but the grace of God which was with me. (1 Cor. 15:10)
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2 Tim. 4:2• 2proclaim the word; be urgent in season and out of season, convict, rebuke, encourage, with all longsuffering and doctrine. (2 Tim. 4:2)

J. N. Darby Translation

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7
And the first day of the week, we being assembled to break bread, Paul discoursed to them, about to depart on the morrow. And he prolonged the discourse till midnight.

W. Kelly Translation

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7
aAnd on the first [day] of the week, when we were gathered together to break bread, Paul discoursed to them, about to depart on the morrow, and prolonged the word till midnight.

WK Translation Notes

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a
we: א A B D E, some twenty cursives, and all the Ancient Versions, as against the Text. Rec.; τῶν μαθητῶν H L P, and most cursives, probably to square with αὐτιῖς. So σἦαν in verse following with the scantiest support. (Exp. of Acts, p.295)
we: As for Acts 20:7, neither italics nor capitals will relieve "Typicus" from the charge of unbelief, nor add a particle of strength to the weak assertion that "there is not the slightest evidence to prove" that it was the Lord's Supper. The language is decisive that it was then the practice of Christians to come together on the first of the week, and this to break bread. (Comp. also 1 Cor. 16:2.) The critical reading (ἠμῶν), which rests on much the best authorities, seems to me stronger than the vulgar one (μαθητῶν), which probably grew out of a desire to make easier sense with αὐτοῖς. Nothing is simpler: all came together to break bread, but with prominence given to Paul and his companions in "we," the family word. (Bible Treasury 6:80)
we: I am sorry to be obliged to point out a necessary correction here. But you will understand that the change has already been made from the truth. I am only seeking to bring souls back to the truth. The real words of the Holy Spirit here were: "When we came together." (It is a question of the true Greek text, not of our version only. Ημῶν is read by א A B D E, twenty cursives, all the ancient versions of value, save perhaps the Coptic, and several of the Greek fathers, as against H L P and most cursives.) Now no doubt at first sight it seems a little harsh. I will read to you how it runs, and you will see that it is a little difficult. In the most authoritative text of this verse, according to the oldest and best MSS., it reads thus: "Upon the first day of the week, when we came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them." One can readily conjecture how the change took place. The copyists, seeing "preached unto them,” thought that "when we came together" did not well harmonize, that there must be some mistake, and that "we" had probably slipped in instead of "the disciples." The truth, however, is, that "we" is right, and that the real intruder is "the disciples." It was the apparent jar of which the correction sought to get rid. This was wrong. Always accept this, my beloved brethren, as a true canon in such questions as to the word of God: never cut the knot of a difficulty in scripture, but wait till God untie it for you. There are difficulties in His word. What is to be done with them? Submit to them; own that you do not understand; pray to God till, in the use of all right means, He clears them up. But never force the word of God. That appears to have been done here. Some of the scribes cut the knot by changing "we came together" into "the disciples came together"; thus they thought that the latter would agree better with "them.”
But now let us simply take the clause as God wrote it; for there cannot be a legitimate doubt, to any competent person who has examined the matter, that I am giving the true form of the verse. Thus it will be found in every critical text of value, no matter whose it may be; and so you will find it in every correct version of the critical text "Upon the first day of the week, when we came together." Why we? Because all had a common interest. Had it been said, "when the disciples came together," it might possibly have been thought that it meant no more than the disciples in that place, who had the habit of meeting together on the first day of the week. But as it is "when we came together to break bread," the principle takes in all saints. All are found here in a common character. The family word, "we," so familiar to the Spirit, is used — "when we came together." It is not merely the mode adopted by the disciples in the Troad. It is the habit of the saints wherever they might be—0of Paul, and Luke, and every one else. The only question that could be raised is, whether the writer does not mean by this to put himself along with the rest when he says, "When we came together to break bread." This I do not doubt he does; but that the phrase goes farther we see from the context, which implies the fixed and regular habit of all saints of God, wherever they had the opportunity, to meet together for the Lord's supper on the first day of the week. (Bible Treasury N9:376)
we: it is correctly "when we came together to break bread, Paul discoursed with them," (Bible Treasury 13:336)