2 Cor. 11:23 KJV (With Strong’s)

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23
Are they
eisi (Greek #1526)
they are
KJV usage: agree, are, be, dure, X is, were.
Pronounce: i-see'
Origin: 3d person plural present indicative of 1510
ministers
diakonos (Greek #1249)
an attendant, i.e. (genitive case) a waiter (at table or in other menial duties); specially, a Christian teacher and pastor (technically, a deacon or deaconess)
KJV usage: deacon, minister, servant.
Pronounce: dee-ak'-on-os
Origin: probably from an obsolete διάκω (to run on errands; compare 1377)
of Christ
Christos (Greek #5547)
anointed, i.e. the Messiah, an epithet of Jesus
KJV usage: Christ.
Pronounce: khris-tos'
Origin: from 5548
? (I
ego (Greek #1473)
a primary pronoun of the first person I (only expressed when emphatic)
KJV usage: I, me. For the other cases and the plural see 1691, 1698, 1700, 2248, 2249, 2254, 2257, etc.
Pronounce: eg-o'
speak
laleo (Greek #2980)
to talk, i.e. utter words
KJV usage: preach, say, speak (after), talk, tell, utter. Compare 3004.
Pronounce: lal-eh'-o
Origin: a prolonged form of an otherwise obsolete verb
as a fool
paraphroneo (Greek #3912)
to misthink, i.e. be insane (silly)
KJV usage: as a fool.
Pronounce: par-af-ron-eh'-o
Origin: from 3844 and 5426
) I
huper (Greek #5228)
"over", i.e. (with the genitive case) of place, above, beyond, across, or causal, for the sake of, instead, regarding; with the accusative case superior to, more than
KJV usage: (+ exceeding, abundantly) above, in (on) behalf of, beyond, by, + very chiefest, concerning, exceeding (above, -ly), for, + very highly, more (than), of, over, on the part of, for sake of, in stead, than, to(-ward), very. In the comparative, it retains many of the above applications.
Pronounce: hoop-er'
Origin: a primary preposition
am more
huper (Greek #5228)
"over", i.e. (with the genitive case) of place, above, beyond, across, or causal, for the sake of, instead, regarding; with the accusative case superior to, more than
KJV usage: (+ exceeding, abundantly) above, in (on) behalf of, beyond, by, + very chiefest, concerning, exceeding (above, -ly), for, + very highly, more (than), of, over, on the part of, for sake of, in stead, than, to(-ward), very. In the comparative, it retains many of the above applications.
Pronounce: hoop-er'
Origin: a primary preposition
; in
en (Greek #1722)
"in," at, (up-)on, by, etc.
KJV usage: about, after, against, + almost, X altogether, among, X as, at, before, between, (here-)by (+ all means), for (... sake of), + give self wholly to, (here-)in(-to, -wardly), X mightily, (because) of, (up-)on, (open-)ly, X outwardly, one, X quickly, X shortly, (speedi-)ly, X that, X there(-in, -on), through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), under, when, where(-with), while, with(-in). Often used in compounds, with substantially the same import; rarely with verbs of motion, and then not to indicate direction, except (elliptically) by a separate (and different) preposition.
Pronounce: en
Origin: a primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), i.e. a relation of rest (intermediate between 1519 and 1537)
labors
kopos (Greek #2873)
a cut, i.e. (by analogy) toil (as reducing the strength), literally or figuratively; by implication, pains
KJV usage: labour, + trouble, weariness.
Pronounce: kop'-os
Origin: from 2875
g more abundant
perissoteros (Greek #4056)
more superabundantly
KJV usage: more abundant(-ly), X the more earnest, (more) exceedingly, more frequent, much more, the rather.
Pronounce: per-is-sot-er'-oce
Origin: adverb from 4055
, in
en (Greek #1722)
"in," at, (up-)on, by, etc.
KJV usage: about, after, against, + almost, X altogether, among, X as, at, before, between, (here-)by (+ all means), for (... sake of), + give self wholly to, (here-)in(-to, -wardly), X mightily, (because) of, (up-)on, (open-)ly, X outwardly, one, X quickly, X shortly, (speedi-)ly, X that, X there(-in, -on), through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), under, when, where(-with), while, with(-in). Often used in compounds, with substantially the same import; rarely with verbs of motion, and then not to indicate direction, except (elliptically) by a separate (and different) preposition.
Pronounce: en
Origin: a primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), i.e. a relation of rest (intermediate between 1519 and 1537)
stripes
plege (Greek #4127)
a stroke; by implication, a wound; figuratively, a calamity
KJV usage: plague, stripe, wound(-ed).
Pronounce: play-gay'
Origin: from 4141
h above measure
huperballontos (Greek #5234)
excessively
KJV usage: beyond measure.
Pronounce: hoop-er-bal-lon'-toce
Origin: adverb from present participle active of 5235
, in
en (Greek #1722)
"in," at, (up-)on, by, etc.
KJV usage: about, after, against, + almost, X altogether, among, X as, at, before, between, (here-)by (+ all means), for (... sake of), + give self wholly to, (here-)in(-to, -wardly), X mightily, (because) of, (up-)on, (open-)ly, X outwardly, one, X quickly, X shortly, (speedi-)ly, X that, X there(-in, -on), through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), under, when, where(-with), while, with(-in). Often used in compounds, with substantially the same import; rarely with verbs of motion, and then not to indicate direction, except (elliptically) by a separate (and different) preposition.
Pronounce: en
Origin: a primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), i.e. a relation of rest (intermediate between 1519 and 1537)
prisons
phulake (Greek #5438)
a guarding or (concretely, guard), the act, the person; figuratively, the place, the condition, or (specially), the time (as a division of day or night), literally or figuratively
KJV usage: cage, hold, (im-)prison(-ment), ward, watch.
Pronounce: foo-lak-ay'
Origin: from 5442
more frequent
perissoteros (Greek #4056)
more superabundantly
KJV usage: more abundant(-ly), X the more earnest, (more) exceedingly, more frequent, much more, the rather.
Pronounce: per-is-sot-er'-oce
Origin: adverb from 4055
, in
en (Greek #1722)
"in," at, (up-)on, by, etc.
KJV usage: about, after, against, + almost, X altogether, among, X as, at, before, between, (here-)by (+ all means), for (... sake of), + give self wholly to, (here-)in(-to, -wardly), X mightily, (because) of, (up-)on, (open-)ly, X outwardly, one, X quickly, X shortly, (speedi-)ly, X that, X there(-in, -on), through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), under, when, where(-with), while, with(-in). Often used in compounds, with substantially the same import; rarely with verbs of motion, and then not to indicate direction, except (elliptically) by a separate (and different) preposition.
Pronounce: en
Origin: a primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), i.e. a relation of rest (intermediate between 1519 and 1537)
deaths
thanatos (Greek #2288)
(properly, an adjective used as a noun) death (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: X deadly, (be...) death.
Pronounce: than'-at-os
Origin: from 2348
k oft
pollakis (Greek #4178)
many times, i.e. frequently
KJV usage: oft(-en, -entimes, -times).
Pronounce: pol-lak'-is
Origin: multiplicative adverb from 4183
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More on:

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Cross References

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Ministry on This Verse

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ministers.
I am.
in labours.
in stripes.
in prison.
Acts 9:16• 16For I will show him how great things he must suffer for my name's sake. (Acts 9:16)
;
Acts 16:24• 24Who, having received such a charge, thrust them into the inner prison, and made their feet fast in the stocks. (Acts 16:24)
;
Acts 20:23• 23Save that the Holy Ghost witnesseth in every city, saying that bonds and afflictions abide me. (Acts 20:23)
;
Acts 21:11• 11And when he was come unto us, he took Paul's girdle, and bound his own hands and feet, and said, Thus saith the Holy Ghost, So shall the Jews at Jerusalem bind the man that owneth this girdle, and shall deliver him into the hands of the Gentiles. (Acts 21:11)
;
Acts 24:26‑27• 26He hoped also that money should have been given him of Paul, that he might loose him: wherefore he sent for him the oftener, and communed with him.
27But after two years Porcius Festus came into Felix' room: and Felix, willing to show the Jews a pleasure, left Paul bound.
(Acts 24:26‑27)
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Acts 25:14• 14And when they had been there many days, Festus declared Paul's cause unto the king, saying, There is a certain man left in bonds by Felix: (Acts 25:14)
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Acts 27:1• 1And when it was determined that we should sail into Italy, they delivered Paul and certain other prisoners unto one named Julius, a centurion of Augustus' band. (Acts 27:1)
;
Acts 28:16,30• 16And when we came to Rome, the centurion delivered the prisoners to the captain of the guard: but Paul was suffered to dwell by himself with a soldier that kept him.
30And Paul dwelt two whole years in his own hired house, and received all that came in unto him,
(Acts 28:16,30)
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Eph. 3:1• 1For this cause I Paul, the prisoner of Jesus Christ for you Gentiles, (Eph. 3:1)
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Eph. 4:1• 1I therefore, the prisoner of the Lord, beseech you that ye walk worthy of the vocation wherewith ye are called, (Eph. 4:1)
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Eph. 6:20• 20For which I am an ambassador in bonds: that therein I may speak boldly, as I ought to speak. (Eph. 6:20)
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Phil. 1:13• 13So that my bonds in Christ are manifest in all the palace, and in all other places; (Phil. 1:13)
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2 Tim. 1:8,16• 8Be not thou therefore ashamed of the testimony of our Lord, nor of me his prisoner: but be thou partaker of the afflictions of the gospel according to the power of God;
16The Lord give mercy unto the house of Onesiphorus; for he oft refreshed me, and was not ashamed of my chain:
(2 Tim. 1:8,16)
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2 Tim. 2:9• 9Wherein I suffer trouble, as an evil doer, even unto bonds; but the word of God is not bound. (2 Tim. 2:9)
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Philem. 9• 9Yet for love's sake I rather beseech thee, being such an one as Paul the aged, and now also a prisoner of Jesus Christ. (Philem. 9)
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Heb. 10:34• 34For ye had compassion of me in my bonds, and took joyfully the spoiling of your goods, knowing in yourselves that ye have in heaven a better and an enduring substance. (Heb. 10:34)
in deaths.
 Here in fact God has allowed this invasion of the Apostle’s work by these wretched Judaizing men (calling themselves Christians) to be the means of acquainting us with something of the indefatigable labors of the Apostle, carried on in a thousand circumstances of which we have no account. In the Acts, God has given us the history of the establishment of the assembly in the great principles on which it was founded, and the phases through which it passed on coming out of Judaism. The Apostle will have his own reward in the kingdom of glory, not by speaking of it among men. (2 Corinthians 11 by J.N. Darby)
 He turns from his very abundant labors to the excess of stripes which had befallen him, his very abundant imprisonments, and his frequent exposures to death. Those who sought to undermine him might boast of their learning or their originality, their logic or their imagination, their depth of thought or their piquancy of illustration. (Notes on 2 Corinthians 11:22-33 by W. Kelly)
 He puts them to shame with (not miracles but) sufferings. (Notes on 2 Corinthians 11:22-33 by W. Kelly)
 It is hardly exposition that is needed here, but thanksgiving for the grace bestowed of God on a man of like passions with ourselves, when the eye surveys such a roll of suffering labor for Christ (Notes on 2 Corinthians 11:22-33 by W. Kelly)

J. N. Darby Translation

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23
Are they ministersa of Christ? (I speak as being beside myself) *I* above measure sob; in labours exceedingly abundant, in stripes to excess, in prisons exceedingly abundant, in deaths oft.

JND Translation Notes

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a
Diakonos. see Note. 1 Cor. 4.1.
b
The word here translated "above measure" is so used constantly by the apostle, though not indeed separated from the word it refers to. But I do not find that it is used adverbially for "more than"; and the expression "as being beside myself" seems to refer to the extra-ordinariness of what he was saying, for he felt that to say "minister of Christ" was to say all that was excellent. Hence he does not repeat "in folly," but says "as being beside myself," "wandering quite away from a right mind." His own heart did not allow him to say he was "minister of Christ" without judging the expression, though forced to use it for these foolish Corinthians. The word translated "exceedingly abundant" is not really a comparison, and the words translated "to excess" and "oft" show that no comparison with others is instituted. He left his miserable competitor far behind, and his soul turned back with true heartfelt satisfaction to all he had undergone for Christ. His folly is given to us for gain by God. However, if anyone prefer "more than they" or "beyond them" to "above measure," in result the sense is not altered, though, it seems to me, feebler and more disjointed.

W. Kelly Translation

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23
Are they ministers of Christ? (Beside myself I speak) I above measure; in labours very abundantly, in prisons very abundantly, in stripes exceedingly, in deaths often1.

WK Translation Notes

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1
above measure: Lachmann gives ὐπερεγώ it is hard to say why. (Notes on 2 Cor., p.211)
very abundantly, in prisons very abundantly: Lachmann and Treg. follow B D E. etc. φυλ. Ρεπ. ἐν πλ. ὐπ.; Tisch. prefers אpm Fgr G, etc. πλ.περ. ἐν φυλ. ὐπ. (Notes on 2 Cor., p.211)
very abundantly, in prisons very abundantly: No doubt the comparative occurs both with "labors" and with "prisons," and even Bengel thought the false apostles experienced these like Paul, but less. But it was overlooked that the Greek tongue often uses the comparative without any object of comparison in a merely intensitive sense, where we should employ the positive qualified by "very," "rather" or the like, meaning (if we attempted to fill up the ellipsis) "more than usual," or "ordinary," etc.; and the context confirms this as well as the moral bearing. (Winer (Gr. N.T. Gr. iii. §35, Moulton’s ed.) seems to deny this, so far as the N.T. is concerned; but hardy assertion is no proof. I do not say that it is ever used for the positive; nor would the superlative suit, but just what is found. Were there only the two comparatives employed, it would be strange to depart from the literal meaning "more abundantly." But as the context stands before and after, and taking account of the moral considerations, as well as the delicate dignity of the apostle, I incline to the version given as preferable.) For μᾶλλον or πλέον would have been more natural to express comparative superiority, while in ὐπερβαλλόντως and πολλάκις just afterward oppose the idea. We see in chapter 10:12 what the apostle felt of comparing, which was their way, not his who was altogether above a habit so far beneath Christ or the Christian. (Notes on 2 Cor., p.214)