2 Cor. 6:4 KJV (With Strong’s)

+
4
But
alla (Greek #235)
properly, other things, i.e. (adverbially) contrariwise (in many relations)
KJV usage: and, but (even), howbeit, indeed, nay, nevertheless, no, notwithstanding, save, therefore, yea, yet.
Pronounce: al-lah'
Origin: neuter plural of 243
in
en (Greek #1722)
"in," at, (up-)on, by, etc.
KJV usage: about, after, against, + almost, X altogether, among, X as, at, before, between, (here-)by (+ all means), for (... sake of), + give self wholly to, (here-)in(-to, -wardly), X mightily, (because) of, (up-)on, (open-)ly, X outwardly, one, X quickly, X shortly, (speedi-)ly, X that, X there(-in, -on), through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), under, when, where(-with), while, with(-in). Often used in compounds, with substantially the same import; rarely with verbs of motion, and then not to indicate direction, except (elliptically) by a separate (and different) preposition.
Pronounce: en
Origin: a primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), i.e. a relation of rest (intermediate between 1519 and 1537)
all
pas (Greek #3956)
apparently a primary word; all, any, every, the whole
KJV usage: all (manner of, means), alway(-s), any (one), X daily, + ever, every (one, way), as many as, + no(-thing), X thoroughly, whatsoever, whole, whosoever.
Pronounce: pas
Origin: including all the forms of declension
things δapproving
sunistao (Greek #4921)
to set together, i.e. (by implication) to introduce (favorably), or (figuratively) to exhibit; intransitively, to stand near, or (figuratively) to constitute
KJV usage: approve, commend, consist, make, stand (with).
Pronounce: soon-is-tah'-o
Origin: συνιστάνω (soon-is-tan'-o), or συνίστημι (soon-is'-tay-mee) from 4862 and 2476 (including its collateral forms)
ourselves
heautou (Greek #1438)
him- (her-, it-, them-, also (in conjunction with the personal pronoun of the other persons) my-, thy-, our-, your-) self (selves), etc.
KJV usage: alone, her (own, -self), (he) himself, his (own), itself, one (to) another, our (thine) own(-selves), + that she had, their (own, own selves), (of) them(-selves), they, thyself, you, your (own, own conceits, own selves, -selves).
Pronounce: heh-ow-too'
Origin: from a reflexive pronoun otherwise obsolete and the genitive case (dative case or accusative case) of 846
as
hos (Greek #5613)
which how, i.e. in that manner (very variously used, as follows)
KJV usage: about, after (that), (according) as (it had been, it were), as soon (as), even as (like), for, how (greatly), like (as, unto), since, so (that), that, to wit, unto, when(-soever), while, X with all speed.
Pronounce: hoce
Origin: probably adverb of comparative from 3739
the ministers
diakonos (Greek #1249)
an attendant, i.e. (genitive case) a waiter (at table or in other menial duties); specially, a Christian teacher and pastor (technically, a deacon or deaconess)
KJV usage: deacon, minister, servant.
Pronounce: dee-ak'-on-os
Origin: probably from an obsolete διάκω (to run on errands; compare 1377)
e of God
theos (Greek #2316)
a deity, especially (with 3588) the supreme Divinity; figuratively, a magistrate; by Hebraism, very
KJV usage: X exceeding, God, god(-ly, -ward).
Pronounce: theh'-os
Origin: of uncertain affinity
, in
en (Greek #1722)
"in," at, (up-)on, by, etc.
KJV usage: about, after, against, + almost, X altogether, among, X as, at, before, between, (here-)by (+ all means), for (... sake of), + give self wholly to, (here-)in(-to, -wardly), X mightily, (because) of, (up-)on, (open-)ly, X outwardly, one, X quickly, X shortly, (speedi-)ly, X that, X there(-in, -on), through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), under, when, where(-with), while, with(-in). Often used in compounds, with substantially the same import; rarely with verbs of motion, and then not to indicate direction, except (elliptically) by a separate (and different) preposition.
Pronounce: en
Origin: a primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), i.e. a relation of rest (intermediate between 1519 and 1537)
much
polus (Greek #4183)
(singular) much (in any respect) or (plural) many; neuter (singular) as adverbial, largely; neuter (plural) as adverb or noun often, mostly, largely
KJV usage: abundant, + altogether, common, + far (passed, spent), (+ be of a) great (age, deal, -ly, while), long, many, much, oft(-en (-times)), plenteous, sore, straitly. Compare 4118, 4119.
Pronounce: pol-oos'
Origin: including the forms from the alternate πολλός
patience
hupomone (Greek #5281)
cheerful (or hopeful) endurance, constancy
KJV usage: enduring, patience, patient continuance (waiting).
Pronounce: hoop-om-on-ay'
Origin: from 5278
, in
en (Greek #1722)
"in," at, (up-)on, by, etc.
KJV usage: about, after, against, + almost, X altogether, among, X as, at, before, between, (here-)by (+ all means), for (... sake of), + give self wholly to, (here-)in(-to, -wardly), X mightily, (because) of, (up-)on, (open-)ly, X outwardly, one, X quickly, X shortly, (speedi-)ly, X that, X there(-in, -on), through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), under, when, where(-with), while, with(-in). Often used in compounds, with substantially the same import; rarely with verbs of motion, and then not to indicate direction, except (elliptically) by a separate (and different) preposition.
Pronounce: en
Origin: a primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), i.e. a relation of rest (intermediate between 1519 and 1537)
afflictions
thlipsis (Greek #2347)
pressure (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: afflicted(-tion), anguish, burdened, persecution, tribulation, trouble.
Pronounce: thlip'-sis
Origin: from 2346
, in
en (Greek #1722)
"in," at, (up-)on, by, etc.
KJV usage: about, after, against, + almost, X altogether, among, X as, at, before, between, (here-)by (+ all means), for (... sake of), + give self wholly to, (here-)in(-to, -wardly), X mightily, (because) of, (up-)on, (open-)ly, X outwardly, one, X quickly, X shortly, (speedi-)ly, X that, X there(-in, -on), through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), under, when, where(-with), while, with(-in). Often used in compounds, with substantially the same import; rarely with verbs of motion, and then not to indicate direction, except (elliptically) by a separate (and different) preposition.
Pronounce: en
Origin: a primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), i.e. a relation of rest (intermediate between 1519 and 1537)
necessities
anagke (Greek #318)
constraint (literally or figuratively); by implication, distress
KJV usage: distress, must needs, (of) necessity(-sary), needeth, needful.
Pronounce: an-ang-kay'
Origin: from 303 and the base of 43
, in
en (Greek #1722)
"in," at, (up-)on, by, etc.
KJV usage: about, after, against, + almost, X altogether, among, X as, at, before, between, (here-)by (+ all means), for (... sake of), + give self wholly to, (here-)in(-to, -wardly), X mightily, (because) of, (up-)on, (open-)ly, X outwardly, one, X quickly, X shortly, (speedi-)ly, X that, X there(-in, -on), through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), under, when, where(-with), while, with(-in). Often used in compounds, with substantially the same import; rarely with verbs of motion, and then not to indicate direction, except (elliptically) by a separate (and different) preposition.
Pronounce: en
Origin: a primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), i.e. a relation of rest (intermediate between 1519 and 1537)
distresses
stenochoria (Greek #4730)
narrowness of room, i.e. (figuratively) calamity
KJV usage: anguish, distress.
Pronounce: sten-okh-o-ree'-ah
Origin: from a compound of 4728 and 5561
,

More on:

+

Cross References

+

Ministry on This Verse

+
in all.
2 Cor. 2:17• 17For we are not as many, which corrupt the word of God: but as of sincerity, but as of God, in the sight of God speak we in Christ. (2 Cor. 2:17)
;
2 Cor. 7:11• 11For behold this selfsame thing, that ye sorrowed after a godly sort, what carefulness it wrought in you, yea, what clearing of yourselves, yea, what indignation, yea, what fear, yea, what vehement desire, yea, what zeal, yea, what revenge! In all things ye have approved yourselves to be clear in this matter. (2 Cor. 7:11)
;
Acts 2:22• 22Ye men of Israel, hear these words; Jesus of Nazareth, a man approved of God among you by miracles and wonders and signs, which God did by him in the midst of you, as ye yourselves also know: (Acts 2:22)
;
Rom. 14:18• 18For he that in these things serveth Christ is acceptable to God, and approved of men. (Rom. 14:18)
;
Rom. 16:10• 10Salute Apelles approved in Christ. Salute them which are of Aristobulus' household. (Rom. 16:10)
;
1 Cor. 9:11• 11If we have sown unto you spiritual things, is it a great thing if we shall reap your carnal things? (1 Cor. 9:11)
;
1 Thess. 2:3‑11• 3For our exhortation was not of deceit, nor of uncleanness, nor in guile:
4But as we were allowed of God to be put in trust with the gospel, even so we speak; not as pleasing men, but God, which trieth our hearts.
5For neither at any time used we flattering words, as ye know, nor a cloke of covetousness; God is witness:
6Nor of men sought we glory, neither of you, nor yet of others, when we might have been burdensome, as the apostles of Christ.
7But we were gentle among you, even as a nurse cherisheth her children:
8So being affectionately desirous of you, we were willing to have imparted unto you, not the gospel of God only, but also our own souls, because ye were dear unto us.
9For ye remember, brethren, our labor and travail: for laboring night and day, because we would not be chargeable unto any of you, we preached unto you the gospel of God.
10Ye are witnesses, and God also, how holily and justly and unblameably we behaved ourselves among you that believe:
11As ye know how we exhorted and comforted and charged every one of you, as a father doth his children,
(1 Thess. 2:3‑11)
;
1 Tim. 2:15• 15Notwithstanding she shall be saved in childbearing, if they continue in faith and charity and holiness with sobriety. (1 Tim. 2:15)
approving.
Gr. commending.
as.
2 Cor. 3:6• 6Who also hath made us able ministers of the new testament; not of the letter, but of the spirit: for the letter killeth, but the spirit giveth life. (2 Cor. 3:6)
;
2 Cor. 11:23• 23Are they ministers of Christ? (I speak as a fool) I am more; in labors more abundant, in stripes above measure, in prisons more frequent, in deaths oft. (2 Cor. 11:23)
;
Isa. 61:6• 6But ye shall be named the Priests of the Lord: men shall call you the Ministers of our God: ye shall eat the riches of the Gentiles, and in their glory shall ye boast yourselves. (Isa. 61:6)
;
Joel 1:9• 9The meat offering and the drink offering is cut off from the house of the Lord; the priests, the Lord's ministers, mourn. (Joel 1:9)
;
Joel 2:17• 17Let the priests, the ministers of the Lord, weep between the porch and the altar, and let them say, Spare thy people, O Lord, and give not thine heritage to reproach, that the heathen should rule over them: wherefore should they say among the people, Where is their God? (Joel 2:17)
;
1 Cor. 3:5• 5Who then is Paul, and who is Apollos, but ministers by whom ye believed, even as the Lord gave to every man? (1 Cor. 3:5)
;
1 Cor. 4:1• 1Let a man so account of us, as of the ministers of Christ, and stewards of the mysteries of God. (1 Cor. 4:1)
;
1 Thess. 3:2• 2And sent Timotheus, our brother, and minister of God, and our fellowlaborer in the gospel of Christ, to establish you, and to comfort you concerning your faith: (1 Thess. 3:2)
;
1 Tim. 4:6• 6If thou put the brethren in remembrance of these things, thou shalt be a good minister of Jesus Christ, nourished up in the words of faith and of good doctrine, whereunto thou hast attained. (1 Tim. 4:6)
in much.
2 Cor. 12:12• 12Truly the signs of an apostle were wrought among you in all patience, in signs, and wonders, and mighty deeds. (2 Cor. 12:12)
;
Luke 21:19• 19In your patience possess ye your souls. (Luke 21:19)
;
Rom. 5:3‑4• 3And not only so, but we glory in tribulations also: knowing that tribulation worketh patience;
4And patience, experience; and experience, hope:
(Rom. 5:3‑4)
;
Col. 1:11• 11Strengthened with all might, according to his glorious power, unto all patience and longsuffering with joyfulness; (Col. 1:11)
;
1 Thess. 5:14• 14Now we exhort you, brethren, warn them that are unruly, comfort the feebleminded, support the weak, be patient toward all men. (1 Thess. 5:14)
;
1 Tim. 6:11• 11But thou, O man of God, flee these things; and follow after righteousness, godliness, faith, love, patience, meekness. (1 Tim. 6:11)
;
2 Tim. 3:10• 10But thou hast fully known my doctrine, manner of life, purpose, faith, longsuffering, charity, patience, (2 Tim. 3:10)
;
Heb. 12:1• 1Wherefore seeing we also are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us, (Heb. 12:1)
;
James 5:7‑10• 7Be patient therefore, brethren, unto the coming of the Lord. Behold, the husbandman waiteth for the precious fruit of the earth, and hath long patience for it, until he receive the early and latter rain.
8Be ye also patient; stablish your hearts: for the coming of the Lord draweth nigh.
9Grudge not one against another, brethren, lest ye be condemned: behold, the judge standeth before the door.
10Take, my brethren, the prophets, who have spoken in the name of the Lord, for an example of suffering affliction, and of patience.
(James 5:7‑10)
;
Rev. 1:9• 9I John, who also am your brother, and companion in tribulation, and in the kingdom and patience of Jesus Christ, was in the isle that is called Patmos, for the word of God, and for the testimony of Jesus Christ. (Rev. 1:9)
;
Rev. 3:10• 10Because thou hast kept the word of my patience, I also will keep thee from the hour of temptation, which shall come upon all the world, to try them that dwell upon the earth. (Rev. 3:10)
afflictions.
necessities.
distresses.
 He approved himself in all things as a minister of God, worthily representing Him in whose name he spoke to men...which showed an inward energy, a sense of obligation to God, and a dependence on Him. (2 Corinthians 6 by J.N. Darby)
 If not as His ministers, what are we? Worse than useless. (Notes on 2 Corinthians 6:4-7 by W. Kelly)
 So the apostle in chapter 12:12, where he sets “all endurance,” or patience, before signs and wonders and works of power as apostolic vouchers. God Himself is called the God of patience no less than of comfort or encouragement. (Notes on 2 Corinthians 6:4-7 by W. Kelly)
 When impatient, one is overcome of evil instead of overcoming it with good in the lowliest form. (Notes on 2 Corinthians 6:4-7 by W. Kelly)
 “Afflictions” or tribulations (θλίψεις) are cases of pressure which every saint has in the world. We are set for this, and must through many tribulations enter into the kingdom of God. (Notes on 2 Corinthians 6:4-7 by W. Kelly)
 Necessities (ἀνάγκαι) express distresses which take the shape of need or constraint, and so, as the early Greek writers noticed, indicate an advance in suffering. (Notes on 2 Corinthians 6:4-7 by W. Kelly)
 Straits (στενοχώριαι) point to such troubles as shut a man up without space to move or turn. (Notes on 2 Corinthians 6:4-7 by W. Kelly)

J. N. Darby Translation

+
4
but in everything commending ourselves as God’s ministers, in much endurancek, in afflictions, in necessities, in straits,

JND Translation Notes

+
k
Or "patience."

W. Kelly Translation

+
4
aBut in everything as ministers of God commending ourselves, in much patience, in affliction, in necessities, in straits,

WK Translation Notes

+
a
as ministers of God commending: It may be noticed that in this version "as God's ministers" is placed before the participle, whereas in Greek it follows. The reason is that our idiom does not admit of the order which is correct in the original because of its definite case-ending. The Authorized Version really expresses ὠς θεοῦ which is the reading of the Clermont manuscript, and the more extraordinary, because the corresponding Latin is "sicut Di [Dei] ministri." The Vulgate falls into the error of translating ὠς θ. διάκονοι "sicut Dei ministros." If the same order were sought in English as in Greek, it would necessitate, I think, the addition of "should;" for there is a difference of sense attaching to the difference of construction, and the apostolic phrase expresses precisely what the context requires. Were it the accusative, διακόνους, the meaning would be commending ourselves as competent to be God's ministers (In this case the order would also differ, probably by placing ἐαυτούς before σ. so as to give the former more emphasis.), whereas with the nominative διάκονοι, as it is, the force is that in everything we in the capacity of His ministers commend ourselves, etc. (Notes on 2 Cor., p.129-130)