Acts 9:31 KJV (With Strong’s)

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31
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ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
Then
oun (Greek #3767)
(adverbially) certainly, or (conjunctionally) accordingly
KJV usage: and (so, truly), but, now (then), so (likewise then), then, therefore, verily, wherefore.
Pronounce: oon
Origin: apparently a primary word
r had
echo (Greek #2192)
(used in certain tenses only) a primary verb; to hold (used in very various applications, literally or figuratively, direct or remote; such as possession; ability, contiuity, relation, or condition)
KJV usage: be (able, X hold, possessed with), accompany, + begin to amend, can(+ -not), X conceive, count, diseased, do + eat, + enjoy, + fear, following, have, hold, keep, + lack, + go to law, lie, + must needs, + of necessity, + need, next, + recover, + reign, + rest, + return, X sick, take for, + tremble, + uncircumcised, use.
Pronounce: ekh'-o
Origin: σχέω (skheh'-o)
the churches
ekklesia (Greek #1577)
a calling out, i.e. (concretely) a popular meeting, especially a religious congregation (Jewish synagogue, or Christian community of members on earth or saints in heaven or both)
KJV usage: assembly, church.
Pronounce: ek-klay-see'-ah
Origin: from a compound of 1537 and a derivative of 2564
rest
eirene (Greek #1515)
peace (literally or figuratively); by implication, prosperity
KJV usage: one, peace, quietness, rest, + set at one again.
Pronounce: i-ray'-nay
Origin: probably from a primary verb εἴρω (to join)
s throughout
kata (Greek #2596)
(prepositionally) down (in place or time), in varied relations (according to the case (genitive, dative or accusative) with which it is joined)
KJV usage: about, according as (to), after, against, (when they were) X alone, among, and, X apart, (even, like) as (concerning, pertaining to touching), X aside, at, before, beyond, by, to the charge of, (charita-)bly, concerning, + covered, (dai-)ly, down, every, (+ far more) exceeding, X more excellent, for, from ... to, godly, in(-asmuch, divers, every, -to, respect of), ... by, after the manner of, + by any means, beyond (out of) measure, X mightily, more, X natural, of (up-)on (X part), out (of every), over against, (+ your) X own, + particularly, so, through(-oughout, -oughout every), thus, (un-)to(-gether, -ward), X uttermost, where(-by), with. In composition it retains many of these applications, and frequently denotes opposition, distribution, or intensity.
Pronounce: kat-ah'
Origin: a primary particle
all
holos (Greek #3650)
"whole" or "all", i.e. complete (in extent, amount, time or degree), especially (neuter) as noun or adverb
KJV usage: all, altogether, every whit, + throughout, whole.
Pronounce: hol'-os
Origin: a primary word
Judea
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
Ioudaia (Greek #2449)
the Judaean land (i.e. Judaea), a region of Palestine
KJV usage: Judaea.
Pronounce: ee-oo-dah'-yah
Origin: feminine of 2453 (with 1093 implied)
and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
Galilee
Galilaia (Greek #1056)
Galiloea (i.e. the heathen circle), a region of Palestine
KJV usage: Galilee.
Pronounce: gal-il-ah'-yah
Origin: of Hebrew origin (01551)
and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
Samaria
Samareia (Greek #4540)
Samaria (i.e. Shomeron), a city and region of Palestine
KJV usage: Samaria.
Pronounce: sam-ar'-i-ah
Origin: of Hebrew origin (08111)
, and were edified
oikodomeo (Greek #3618)
to be a house-builder, i.e. construct or (figuratively) confirm
KJV usage: (be in) build(-er, -ing, up), edify, embolden.
Pronounce: oy-kod-om-eh'-o
Origin: from the same as 3619
u; and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
walking
poreuomai (Greek #4198)
middle voice from a derivative of the same as 3984; to traverse, i.e. travel (literally or figuratively; especially to remove (figuratively, die), live, etc.); --depart, go (away, forth, one's way, up), (make a, take a) journey, walk.
Pronounce: por-yoo'-om-ahee
v in the fear
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
phobos (Greek #5401)
alarm or fright
KJV usage: be afraid, + exceedingly, fear, terror.
Pronounce: fob'-os
Origin: from a primary φέβομαι (to be put in fear)
of the Lord
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
kurios (Greek #2962)
supreme in authority, i.e. (as noun) controller; by implication, Master (as a respectful title)
KJV usage: God, Lord, master, Sir.
Pronounce: koo'-ree-os
Origin: from κῦρος (supremacy)
, and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
in the comfort
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
paraklesis (Greek #3874)
imploration, hortation, solace
KJV usage: comfort, consolation, exhortation, intreaty.
Pronounce: par-ak'-lay-sis
Origin: from 3870
w of the Holy
hagios (Greek #40)
sacred (physically, pure, morally blameless or religious, ceremonially, consecrated)
KJV usage: (most) holy (one, thing), saint.
Pronounce: hag'-ee-os
Origin: from ἅγος (an awful thing) (compare 53, 2282)
Ghost
pneuma (Greek #4151)
a current of air, i.e. breath (blast) or a breeze; by analogy or figuratively, a spirit, i.e. (human) the rational soul, (by implication) vital principle, mental disposition, etc., or (superhuman) an angel, demon, or (divine) God, Christ's spirit, the Holy Spirit
KJV usage: ghost, life, spirit(-ual, -ually), mind. Compare 5590.
Pronounce: pnyoo'-mah
Origin: from 4154
, were multiplied
plethuno (Greek #4129)
to increase (transitively or intransitively)
KJV usage: abound, multiply.
Pronounce: play-thoo'-no
Origin: from another form of 4128
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men (Greek #3303)
properly, indicative of affirmation or concession (in fact); usually followed by a contrasted clause with 1161 (this one, the former, etc.)
KJV usage: even, indeed, so, some, truly, verily. Often compounded with other particles in an intensive or asseverative sense.
Pronounce: men
Origin: a primary particle
x

More on:

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Cross References

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the churches.
Acts 8:1• 1And Saul was consenting unto his death. And at that time there was a great persecution against the church which was at Jerusalem; and they were all scattered abroad throughout the regions of Judea and Samaria, except the apostles. (Acts 8:1)
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Deut. 12:10• 10But when ye go over Jordan, and dwell in the land which the Lord your God giveth you to inherit, and when he giveth you rest from all your enemies round about, so that ye dwell in safety; (Deut. 12:10)
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Josh. 21:44• 44And the Lord gave them rest round about, according to all that he sware unto their fathers: and there stood not a man of all their enemies before them; the Lord delivered all their enemies into their hand. (Josh. 21:44)
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Judg. 3:30• 30So Moab was subdued that day under the hand of Israel. And the land had rest fourscore years. (Judg. 3:30)
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1 Chron. 22:9,18• 9Behold, a son shall be born to thee, who shall be a man of rest; and I will give him rest from all his enemies round about: for his name shall be Solomon, and I will give peace and quietness unto Israel in his days.
18Is not the Lord your God with you? and hath he not given you rest on every side? for he hath given the inhabitants of the land into mine hand; and the land is subdued before the Lord, and before his people.
(1 Chron. 22:9,18)
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Psa. 94:13• 13That thou mayest give him rest from the days of adversity, until the pit be digged for the wicked. (Psa. 94:13)
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Prov. 16:7• 7When a man's ways please the Lord, he maketh even his enemies to be at peace with him. (Prov. 16:7)
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Isa. 11:10• 10And in that day there shall be a root of Jesse, which shall stand for an ensign of the people; to it shall the Gentiles seek: and his rest shall be glorious. (Isa. 11:10)
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Zech. 9:1• 1The burden of the word of the Lord in the land of Hadrach, and Damascus shall be the rest thereof: when the eyes of man, as of all the tribes of Israel, shall be toward the Lord. (Zech. 9:1)
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Heb. 4:9• 9There remaineth therefore a rest to the people of God. (Heb. 4:9)
were edified.
Rom. 14:19• 19Let us therefore follow after the things which make for peace, and things wherewith one may edify another. (Rom. 14:19)
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1 Cor. 3:9‑15• 9For we are laborers together with God: ye are God's husbandry, ye are God's building.
10According to the grace of God which is given unto me, as a wise masterbuilder, I have laid the foundation, and another buildeth thereon. But let every man take heed how he buildeth thereupon.
11For other foundation can no man lay than that is laid, which is Jesus Christ.
12Now if any man build upon this foundation gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay, stubble;
13Every man's work shall be made manifest: for the day shall declare it, because it shall be revealed by fire; and the fire shall try every man's work of what sort it is.
14If any man's work abide which he hath built thereupon, he shall receive a reward.
15If any man's work shall be burned, he shall suffer loss: but he himself shall be saved; yet so as by fire.
(1 Cor. 3:9‑15)
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1 Cor. 14:4‑5,12,26• 4He that speaketh in an unknown tongue edifieth himself; but he that prophesieth edifieth the church.
5I would that ye all spake with tongues, but rather that ye prophesied: for greater is he that prophesieth than he that speaketh with tongues, except he interpret, that the church may receive edifying.
12Even so ye, forasmuch as ye are zealous of spiritual gifts, seek that ye may excel to the edifying of the church.
26How is it then, brethren? when ye come together, every one of you hath a psalm, hath a doctrine, hath a tongue, hath a revelation, hath an interpretation. Let all things be done unto edifying.
(1 Cor. 14:4‑5,12,26)
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2 Cor. 10:8• 8For though I should boast somewhat more of our authority, which the Lord hath given us for edification, and not for your destruction, I should not be ashamed: (2 Cor. 10:8)
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2 Cor. 12:19• 19Again, think ye that we excuse ourselves unto you? we speak before God in Christ: but we do all things, dearly beloved, for your edifying. (2 Cor. 12:19)
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2 Cor. 13:10• 10Therefore I write these things being absent, lest being present I should use sharpness, according to the power which the Lord hath given me to edification, and not to destruction. (2 Cor. 13:10)
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Eph. 4:12,16,29• 12For the perfecting of the saints, for the work of the ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ:
16From whom the whole body fitly joined together and compacted by that which every joint supplieth, according to the effectual working in the measure of every part, maketh increase of the body unto the edifying of itself in love.
29Let no corrupt communication proceed out of your mouth, but that which is good to the use of edifying, that it may minister grace unto the hearers.
(Eph. 4:12,16,29)
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1 Thess. 5:11• 11Wherefore comfort yourselves together, and edify one another, even as also ye do. (1 Thess. 5:11)
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1 Tim. 1:4• 4Neither give heed to fables and endless genealogies, which minister questions, rather than godly edifying which is in faith: so do. (1 Tim. 1:4)
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Jude 20• 20But ye, beloved, building up yourselves on your most holy faith, praying in the Holy Ghost, (Jude 20)
and walking.
Neh. 5:9,15• 9Also I said, It is not good that ye do: ought ye not to walk in the fear of our God because of the reproach of the heathen our enemies?
15But the former governors that had been before me were chargeable unto the people, and had taken of them bread and wine, beside forty shekels of silver; yea, even their servants bare rule over the people: but so did not I, because of the fear of God.
(Neh. 5:9,15)
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Job 28:28• 28And unto man he said, Behold, the fear of the Lord, that is wisdom; and to depart from evil is understanding. (Job 28:28)
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Psa. 86:11• 11Teach me thy way, O Lord; I will walk in thy truth: unite my heart to fear thy name. (Psa. 86:11)
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Psa. 111:10• 10The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom: a good understanding have all they that do his commandments: his praise endureth for ever. (Psa. 111:10)
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Prov. 1:7• 7The fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge: but fools despise wisdom and instruction. (Prov. 1:7)
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Prov. 8:13• 13The fear of the Lord is to hate evil: pride, and arrogancy, and the evil way, and the froward mouth, do I hate. (Prov. 8:13)
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Prov. 14:26‑27• 26In the fear of the Lord is strong confidence: and his children shall have a place of refuge.
27The fear of the Lord is a fountain of life, to depart from the snares of death.
(Prov. 14:26‑27)
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Prov. 16:6• 6By mercy and truth iniquity is purged: and by the fear of the Lord men depart from evil. (Prov. 16:6)
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Prov. 23:17• 17Let not thine heart envy sinners: but be thou in the fear of the Lord all the day long. (Prov. 23:17)
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Isa. 11:2‑3• 2And the spirit of the Lord shall rest upon him, the spirit of wisdom and understanding, the spirit of counsel and might, the spirit of knowledge and of the fear of the Lord;
3And shall make him of quick understanding in the fear of the Lord: and he shall not judge after the sight of his eyes, neither reprove after the hearing of his ears:
(Isa. 11:2‑3)
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Isa. 33:6• 6And wisdom and knowledge shall be the stability of thy times, and strength of salvation: the fear of the Lord is his treasure. (Isa. 33:6)
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2 Cor. 7:1• 1Having therefore these promises, dearly beloved, let us cleanse ourselves from all filthiness of the flesh and spirit, perfecting holiness in the fear of God. (2 Cor. 7:1)
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Eph. 5:21• 21Submitting yourselves one to another in the fear of God. (Eph. 5:21)
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Col. 1:10• 10That ye might walk worthy of the Lord unto all pleasing, being fruitful in every good work, and increasing in the knowledge of God; (Col. 1:10)
and in.
John 14:16‑18• 16And I will pray the Father, and he shall give you another Comforter, that he may abide with you for ever;
17Even the Spirit of truth; whom the world cannot receive, because it seeth him not, neither knoweth him: but ye know him; for he dwelleth with you, and shall be in you.
18I will not leave you comfortless: I will come to you.
(John 14:16‑18)
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Rom. 5:5• 5And hope maketh not ashamed; because the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Ghost which is given unto us. (Rom. 5:5)
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Rom. 14:17• 17For the kingdom of God is not meat and drink; but righteousness, and peace, and joy in the Holy Ghost. (Rom. 14:17)
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Rom. 15:13• 13Now the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, that ye may abound in hope, through the power of the Holy Ghost. (Rom. 15:13)
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Gal. 5:22‑23• 22But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, gentleness, goodness, faith,
23Meekness, temperance: against such there is no law.
(Gal. 5:22‑23)
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Eph. 1:13‑14• 13In whom ye also trusted, after that ye heard the word of truth, the gospel of your salvation: in whom also after that ye believed, ye were sealed with that holy Spirit of promise,
14Which is the earnest of our inheritance until the redemption of the purchased possession, unto the praise of his glory.
(Eph. 1:13‑14)
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Eph. 6:18‑19• 18Praying always with all prayer and supplication in the Spirit, and watching thereunto with all perseverance and supplication for all saints;
19And for me, that utterance may be given unto me, that I may open my mouth boldly, to make known the mystery of the gospel,
(Eph. 6:18‑19)
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Phil. 2:1• 1If there be therefore any consolation in Christ, if any comfort of love, if any fellowship of the Spirit, if any bowels and mercies, (Phil. 2:1)
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2 Thess. 2:16‑17• 16Now our Lord Jesus Christ himself, and God, even our Father, which hath loved us, and hath given us everlasting consolation and good hope through grace,
17Comfort your hearts, and stablish you in every good word and work.
(2 Thess. 2:16‑17)
were multiplied.

J. N. Darby Translation

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31
The assembliesa then throughout the whole of Judaea and Galilee and Samaria had peace, being edified and walking in the fear of the Lord, and were increased through the comfort of the Holy Spiritb.

JND Translation Notes

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a
Or "assembly," as many MSS.
b
Or "enjoyed peace ... and in the comfort of the Holy Spirit, were multiplied."

W. Kelly Translation

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31
aThe assembly then, throughout the whole of Judæa and Galilee and Samaria, had peace, being edified, and walking in the fear of the Lord and the comfort of the Holy Spirit, was multiplied.

WK Translation Notes

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a
assembly: The singular is read by א ABC Vulg. Syr. Pst., Sah. Cop. Arm. AEthiop, Erp Arab., et al., as against the plural of the Text. Rec. HLP Syr. Hcl (and E, έκκλησίαι πασαι). (Exp. of Acts, p.143)
assembly: The external authority is very decidedly for the singular against the plural. Thus all the first-rate Uncials, the Sinai, Vatican, Alexandrian, and Palimpsest of Paris, supported by some of the best cursives and all the best ancient versions, oppose the vulgar reading.... One hundred and fifty years ago, Dr. E. Wells, in his "Help for the more easy and clear understanding of the Scriptures" (Oxford, 1718), not only adopted the singular in his Greek text and his English paraphrase, but pointed out in his Annotations the great weakness of the argument drawn by dissenters from the plural ἐκκλησίαι., as if it favored their system of separate churches.... The common text and translations have "the churches;" but I believe that this faulty form crept in here, because the sense of the oneness of the church so speedily passed away. (Lect. Intro. to Acts, Cath. Epist., and Rev., p.63-4)
assembly: By the way, in passing, I would remark that Acts 9:31 has its force impaired, to say the least, in the common Greek text and English version.... Now the best copies and most ancient versions give "the church," not "the churches." I admit fully there were churches in all these districts; but there is nothing peculiar in this. But that which, I am persuaded, the Spirit of God wrote here, was "the church." Minds were perplexed very early indeed. The idea of the church as a subsisting united society upon the earth is easily lost sight of, particularly when we look at different districts and countries, such as Judaea, and Galilee, and Samaria. The true reading at once leads us back to the substantial unity that belonged to the church, or assembly of God, here below. There might be ever so many assemblies throughout Judaea, and Samaria, and Galilee, but it was the church. I admit that we often hear of the churches of Judaea, and of other countries, as Galatia for instance. No one questions the fact of many different assemblies in these different lands. But then there is another truth which has not been seen for a long while by the great mass of God's children not only that God set up a body which did not exist before, but that wherever assemblies might be, it was all the assembly. Not only did He constitute the church upon earth, susceptible of daily growth, but while He extended the work, while He formed fresh assemblies in this or that district and country, it was nevertheless one and the same church wherever it might be. This scripture, rightly read, furnishes a strong proof of it; and I will now just add that the best authorities leave no doubt on my mind as to this. The word churches supplanted the church at an early day; and probably it is due to the fact that very soon the copyists, like other people, began to lose sight of the unity which God was establishing among His children upon the earth. (The external authority stands thus. The Alexandrian, the Vatican, the Palimpsest of Paris, and the Sinai MSS. are documents of the highest value, which agree in reading "the church," not "the churches." In this they are supported by the most important cursive extant, now in the British Museum, along with a fair number of others.
Of the ancient versions, there is not one of first-rate authority which does not conform to the singular the — Peschito Syriac, Coptic, Sahidic, Vulgate, AEthiopic, Armenian, and the Erpenian Arabic. The most ancient Uncial which gives the plural form is that of Laud, in the Bodleian Library, of about the sixth or seventh century, supported by two others of the ninth century, with the mass of cursives, the Philoxenian Syriac, and an Arabic version. But even here it is to be remarked that the weightiest, or Laudean copy, is unquestionably wrong in reading "all the churches;" and the others may have been influenced by Acts 16:5. It is certainly easier to suppose that the less usual form might have been changed by scribes to a common type, which the crowd of juniors escaped. Ordinarily, the tendency runs in a direction exactly opposite.)
It is so much more natural to conceive merely of distinct churches, than to take in the precious truth of the church wherever it is found upon the face of the earth. This may have led to assimilating the true phrase to another and more familiar one, especially when the sense of unity decayed and disappeared. (Lect. on the Church, p.85-7)
assembly:... the uncial MSS. E H L P with the great mass of cursives, two ancient versions, and some Greek and Latin fathers, oppose א A B C, some dozen cursives, most of the very ancient versions and several ecclesiastical writers. For it is my judgment that "the church," as it has the best and oldest testimony, so also ought to be frankly accepted as the true reading. It was probably changed by scribes, who were struck by its peculiarity and did not understand its force, into conformity with Acts 16:5, where the plural is as right as here it seems weaker than the singular. "The church, then, throughout (καθ’ with the genitive) the whole of Judea and Galilee and Samaria had peace,” etc. .. it is a simple intimation that the church viewed as a whole, wherever it had extended, had peace; and hence it is in sense equivalent to the church of God in its entirety here below. For at that time, though there may have been individual members disseminated more widely, gathering to Christ's name as yet was unknown beyond the lands here defined. (Bible Treasury 14:205)
assembly:... a charge which will surprise every man of real learning among the Anglicans as well as anywhere else in Christendom.
“And when Scripture does not use the exact words that suit his theory, he [Mr. Kelly] undertakes, with the most astounding presumption, to speak for the Holy Ghost and says (referring to the expression, Acts 9:31, 'Then had the churches rest'), 'But that which I am persuaded the Holy Ghost wrote here, was the Church.' The Holy Ghost is continually made answerable for what Mr. K. asserts, which to us sounds very much like profaneness, not reverence. Whether it be so, let others judge.”
Others will judge (and this, were they the bitterest enemies of "the Brethren") that the Christian Observer has committed itself here to unwarrantable abuse, growing out of an ignorance of New Testament criticism which is in the highest degree disgraceful to a man who presumes to write on such subjects, and to the party which could produce and reproduce such flippant floundering about God's word. The candid reader is requested to examine the "Six Lectures on Fundamental Truths," pp. 85-86. Is it true that the author undertakes to speak for the Holy Ghost when Scripture does not suit? It is a baseless calumny; and the writer must be totally incompetent to understand the grounds on which the decision of such a point turns. For there is an ample statement of the overwhelming ancient authority of manuscripts and versions, which reject the vulgar "churches" as not Scripture, and read ἐκκλησία, "Church" as the exact word spoken by the Holy Ghost. (Bible Treasury 6:158)
assembly: [The RV follows] "church" rather than "churches" in verse 31, the Compluten. giving the plural form in Greek, the singular in Latin. (Bible Treasury 13:335)
the: The article is omitted by A, though read by all others. (Exp. of Acts, p.143)