Heb. 12:22 KJV (With Strong’s)

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22
But
alla (Greek #235)
properly, other things, i.e. (adverbially) contrariwise (in many relations)
KJV usage: and, but (even), howbeit, indeed, nay, nevertheless, no, notwithstanding, save, therefore, yea, yet.
Pronounce: al-lah'
Origin: neuter plural of 243
ye are come
proserchomai (Greek #4334)
to approach, i.e. (literally) come near, visit, or (figuratively) worship, assent to
KJV usage: (as soon as he) come (unto), come thereunto, consent, draw near, go (near, to, unto).
Pronounce: pros-er'-khom-ahee
Origin: from 4314 and 2064 (including its alternate)
unto mount
oros (Greek #3735)
a mountain (as lifting itself above the plain)
KJV usage: hill, mount(-ain).
Pronounce: or'-os
Origin: probably from an obsolete ὄρω (to rise or "rear"; perhaps akin to 142; compare 3733)
Sion
Sion (Greek #4622)
Sion (i.e. Tsijon), a hill of Jerusalem; figuratively, the Church (militant or triumphant)
KJV usage: Sion.
Pronounce: see-own'
Origin: of Hebrew origin (06726)
, and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
unto the city
polis (Greek #4172)
a town (properly, with walls, of greater or less size)
KJV usage: city.
Pronounce: pol'-is
Origin: probably from the same as 4171, or perhaps from 4183
e of the
theos (Greek #2316)
a deity, especially (with 3588) the supreme Divinity; figuratively, a magistrate; by Hebraism, very
KJV usage: X exceeding, God, god(-ly, -ward).
Pronounce: theh'-os
Origin: of uncertain affinity
living
zao (Greek #2198)
to live (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: life(-time), (a-)live(-ly), quick.
Pronounce: dzah'-o
Origin: a primary verb
God
theos (Greek #2316)
a deity, especially (with 3588) the supreme Divinity; figuratively, a magistrate; by Hebraism, very
KJV usage: X exceeding, God, god(-ly, -ward).
Pronounce: theh'-os
Origin: of uncertain affinity
, the
Hierousalem (Greek #2419)
Hierusalem (i.e. Jerushalem), the capitol of Palestine
KJV usage: Jerusalem. Compare 2414.
Pronounce: hee-er-oo-sal-ame'
Origin: of Hebrew origin (03389)
heavenly
epouranios (Greek #2032)
above the sky
KJV usage: celestial, (in) heaven(-ly), high.
Pronounce: ep-oo-ran'-ee-os
Origin: from 1909 and 3772
Jerusalem
Hierousalem (Greek #2419)
Hierusalem (i.e. Jerushalem), the capitol of Palestine
KJV usage: Jerusalem. Compare 2414.
Pronounce: hee-er-oo-sal-ame'
Origin: of Hebrew origin (03389)
, and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
to an innumerable company
murias (Greek #3461)
a ten-thousand; by extension, a "myriad" or indefinite number
KJV usage: ten thousand.
Pronounce: moo-ree'-as
Origin: from 3463
of angels
aggelos (Greek #32)
a messenger; especially an "angel"; by implication, a pastor
KJV usage: angel, messenger.
Pronounce: ang'-el-os
Origin: from ἀγγέλλω (probably derived from 71; compare 34) (to bring tidings)
h,

Cross References

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Ministry on This Verse

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ye are come.
Psa. 2:6• 6Yet have I set my king upon my holy hill of Zion. (Psa. 2:6)
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Psa. 48:2• 2Beautiful for situation, the joy of the whole earth, is mount Zion, on the sides of the north, the city of the great King. (Psa. 48:2)
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Psa. 132:13‑14• 13For the Lord hath chosen Zion; he hath desired it for his habitation.
14This is my rest for ever: here will I dwell; for I have desired it.
(Psa. 132:13‑14)
;
Isa. 12:6• 6Cry out and shout, thou inhabitant of Zion: for great is the Holy One of Israel in the midst of thee. (Isa. 12:6)
;
Isa. 14:32• 32What shall one then answer the messengers of the nation? That the Lord hath founded Zion, and the poor of his people shall trust in it. (Isa. 14:32)
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Isa. 28:16• 16Therefore thus saith the Lord God, Behold, I lay in Zion for a foundation a stone, a tried stone, a precious corner stone, a sure foundation: he that believeth shall not make haste. (Isa. 28:16)
;
Isa. 51:11,16• 11Therefore the redeemed of the Lord shall return, and come with singing unto Zion; and everlasting joy shall be upon their head: they shall obtain gladness and joy; and sorrow and mourning shall flee away.
16And I have put my words in thy mouth, and I have covered thee in the shadow of mine hand, that I may plant the heavens, and lay the foundations of the earth, and say unto Zion, Thou art my people.
(Isa. 51:11,16)
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Isa. 59:20• 20And the Redeemer shall come to Zion, and unto them that turn from transgression in Jacob, saith the Lord. (Isa. 59:20)
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Isa. 60:14• 14The sons also of them that afflicted thee shall come bending unto thee; and all they that despised thee shall bow themselves down at the soles of thy feet; and they shall call thee, The city of the Lord, The Zion of the Holy One of Israel. (Isa. 60:14)
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Joel 2:32• 32And it shall come to pass, that whosoever shall call on the name of the Lord shall be delivered: for in mount Zion and in Jerusalem shall be deliverance, as the Lord hath said, and in the remnant whom the Lord shall call. (Joel 2:32)
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Rom. 11:26• 26And so all Israel shall be saved: as it is written, There shall come out of Sion the Deliverer, and shall turn away ungodliness from Jacob: (Rom. 11:26)
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Gal. 4:26• 26But Jerusalem which is above is free, which is the mother of us all. (Gal. 4:26)
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Rev. 14:1• 1And I looked, and, lo, a Lamb stood on the mount Sion, and with him an hundred forty and four thousand, having his Father's name written in their foreheads. (Rev. 14:1)
the city.
Heb. 13:14• 14For here have we no continuing city, but we seek one to come. (Heb. 13:14)
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Psa. 48:2• 2Beautiful for situation, the joy of the whole earth, is mount Zion, on the sides of the north, the city of the great King. (Psa. 48:2)
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Psa. 87:3• 3Glorious things are spoken of thee, O city of God. Selah. (Psa. 87:3)
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Matt. 5:35• 35Nor by the earth; for it is his footstool: neither by Jerusalem; for it is the city of the great King. (Matt. 5:35)
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Phil. 3:20• 20For our conversation is in heaven; from whence also we look for the Saviour, the Lord Jesus Christ: (Phil. 3:20)
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Phil. 3•  (Phil. 3)
:*marg:;
Rev. 3:12• 12Him that overcometh will I make a pillar in the temple of my God, and he shall go no more out: and I will write upon him the name of my God, and the name of the city of my God, which is new Jerusalem, which cometh down out of heaven from my God: and I will write upon him my new name. (Rev. 3:12)
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Rev. 21:2,10• 2And I John saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down from God out of heaven, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband.
10And he carried me away in the spirit to a great and high mountain, and showed me that great city, the holy Jerusalem, descending out of heaven from God,
(Rev. 21:2,10)
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Rev. 22:19• 19And if any man shall take away from the words of the book of this prophecy, God shall take away his part out of the book of life, and out of the holy city, and from the things which are written in this book. (Rev. 22:19)
of the.
Heb. 3:12• 12Take heed, brethren, lest there be in any of you an evil heart of unbelief, in departing from the living God. (Heb. 3:12)
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Heb. 9:14• 14How much more shall the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself without spot to God, purge your conscience from dead works to serve the living God? (Heb. 9:14)
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Heb. 10:31• 31It is a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the living God. (Heb. 10:31)
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Deut. 5:26• 26For who is there of all flesh, that hath heard the voice of the living God speaking out of the midst of the fire, as we have, and lived? (Deut. 5:26)
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Josh. 3:10• 10And Joshua said, Hereby ye shall know that the living God is among you, and that he will without fail drive out from before you the Canaanites, and the Hittites, and the Hivites, and the Perizzites, and the Girgashites, and the Amorites, and the Jebusites. (Josh. 3:10)
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2 Kings 19:4• 4It may be the Lord thy God will hear all the words of Rabshakeh, whom the king of Assyria his master hath sent to reproach the living God; and will reprove the words which the Lord thy God hath heard: wherefore lift up thy prayer for the remnant that are left. (2 Kings 19:4)
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Psa. 42:2• 2My soul thirsteth for God, for the living God: when shall I come and appear before God? (Psa. 42:2)
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Psa. 84:2• 2My soul longeth, yea, even fainteth for the courts of the Lord: my heart and my flesh crieth out for the living God. (Psa. 84:2)
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Jer. 10:10• 10But the Lord is the true God, he is the living God, and an everlasting king: at his wrath the earth shall tremble, and the nations shall not be able to abide his indignation. (Jer. 10:10)
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Dan. 6:26• 26I make a decree, That in every dominion of my kingdom men tremble and fear before the God of Daniel: for he is the living God, and stedfast for ever, and his kingdom that which shall not be destroyed, and his dominion shall be even unto the end. (Dan. 6:26)
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Hos. 1:10• 10Yet the number of the children of Israel shall be as the sand of the sea, which cannot be measured nor numbered; and it shall come to pass, that in the place where it was said unto them, Ye are not my people, there it shall be said unto them, Ye are the sons of the living God. (Hos. 1:10)
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Matt. 16:16• 16And Simon Peter answered and said, Thou art the Christ, the Son of the living God. (Matt. 16:16)
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Rom. 9:26• 26And it shall come to pass, that in the place where it was said unto them, Ye are not my people; there shall they be called the children of the living God. (Rom. 9:26)
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1 Thess. 1:9• 9For they themselves show of us what manner of entering in we had unto you, and how ye turned to God from idols to serve the living and true God; (1 Thess. 1:9)
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Rev. 7:2• 2And I saw another angel ascending from the east, having the seal of the living God: and he cried with a loud voice to the four angels, to whom it was given to hurt the earth and the sea, (Rev. 7:2)
an innumerable.
 No mountain in the O.T., stood in such formal contrast with Sinai as Zion. The one was, as just noticed, the never to be forgotten scene of national responsibility to the law; the other the intervention of Jehovah in grace for His king when all was ruin, people and priests alike wicked, the ark taken by the Philistines, Ichabod confessed, Israel's king and his sons slain, and the Jebusite not only in the center and stronghold of Jerusalem but defiant and insulting. Then it was that Jehovah, as He chose David, so also chose the mount Zion which He loved. (Hebrews 12:22-24 by W. Kelly)
 our epistle simply introduces mount Zion compared with Sinai and its legal associations, as the signal expression of divine grace interposing to establish the kingdom after a scene of grievous sin and long humiliation. (Hebrews 12:22-24 by W. Kelly)
 If Zion was morally the highest to be descried here below, we now leave earth behind and above behold the city for which Abraham looked, as God prepared it for such as were pilgrims and strangers on earth, a city which hath the foundations, whose maker and builder is God. (Hebrews 12:22-24 by W. Kelly)
 all God's hosts that excel in strength, that do His commandments, hearkening unto the voice of His word. Here they are presented in their fullness of various order. (Hebrews 12:22-24 by W. Kelly)

J. N. Darby Translation

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22
but ye have come to mount Ziona; and to the city of the living God, heavenly Jerusalem; and to myriads of angels,

JND Translation Notes

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a
The words "and" give the division of the subjects very distinctly here.

W. Kelly Translation

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22
aBut ye have approached to mount Zion; and to a living God’s city, heavenly Jerusalem; and to myriads of angels, a universal assemblage;

WK Translation Notes

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a
and... and: the Revisers have failed to give the true connection, καί really indicating each new object, and consequently misrepresented the sense of this weighty passage. The myriads of angels are the general assembly, and "church of firstborn ones" are a new and wholly distinct group, here confounded with παρηγύρει, which really goes with άγγέλων. (Bible Treasury 14:48)
and... and: It is to be regretted that the Americans [correctors of the RV] seem as far as the Revisers from correcting the vicious arrangement in 22, 23, where they all failed to see that καὶ defines each new clause after the first in the sentence from 22-24.... "To the general assembly and the church" etc. is a muddle, the first term of which should end the previous object enumerated; the second begins a new one with the conjunction prefixed. (Bible Treasury 15:32)
and [7 times]: No mountain named in the Bible suited the aim here so admirably as Zion, the Zion of scripture, not the whimsical substitute of theology, "the catholic church" as even Cromwell's Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University, the able and excellent J. Owen makes it to be, militant and triumphant, and to this end omits the copulative (Works, xxiv. 329, Goold's Ed.). But here we may add that almost all editors of the Greek Test. as well as the commentators almost universally fall into error sometimes repeatedly, by not heeding the plain and sure fact that the conjunction (καὶ - and) connects with Zion each new and distinct link in the chain of glory. In the next page after, as in the text of the page before, it is given correctly; but such laxity makes sound exegesis impossible. The most prevalent instance is in joining "general assembly" (as in the Auth. Ver.) with "the church of the firstborn;" of which Dr. Owen of course is also guilty, to the destruction of all right intelligence of the context. The least skilful of handlers could not have the hardihood to construe "God the judge of all," "Jesus the mediator of the new covenant," and "the blood of sprinkling" etc., as the further description of the catholic church; but they do strive hard to merge "the spirits of just men made perfect" in the same object.
Even J.A. Bengel (Gnomon ii. 467, Ed. 1836) lumped "myriads of angels and firstborns" in one category, so as to make out his double sevenfold; whereas the latter consists really of eight, not of seven. Yet in the next p. 468 he properly asks, who would join together as synonyms the church of the firstborn with the general assembly of angels? Nevertheless, who knows not that able men of research like Dean Alford, and Bp. Chr. Wordsworth, and Bp. Westcott, persist in the same false punctuation, and in joining more or less two categories so different as the angels and the church; as the erudite Bp. J. Pearson laid down in his famous exposition of the Creed since 1658? The perplexities of the learned are great and varied, as F. Delitzsch here speaks of three closely connected questions, and among the hardest in our Epistle. But, whatever the connection, the difficulty is largely due to overlooking the help rendered by the conjunction as the introduction of each added object after the first, or Zion. The neglect of this threw even so emminent a preacher and teacher as J. Howe into confusion like almost every other, as we may see in his use of this scripture everywhere, particularly in his sermon, or part of it, dedicated to Lady Russell. Lesser lights we need not notice. (Bible Treasury N5:107-108)
and [7 times]: The conjunction simply and effectively introduces and connects each of the objects in a remarkable order after the first, as we shall see. This was overlooked in the A.V. following other translators, to the ruin of the meaning between the latter clause of verse 22 and beginning of verse 23. (Exp. of Heb., p.248)
a universal assemblage: The phrase "general assembly" (πανηγύρει) is clearly, in my judgment, epexegetic of the preceding words, "the innumerable company of angels," just as, in the clause before, "the heavenly Jerusalem" is a further explanation of "the city of the living God." The conjunction καί introduces each new clause, which arrangement is destroyed in this particular instance, but observed in all the other parts of the sentence in the English Bible. The same confusion appears in Beza, Diodati, the Dutch, Martin, Ostervald, the Lausanne, etc. Bengel rightly objects to this construction. "Nam et polysyndeton retinendum est; et aliorum sine dubio est panegyris: aliorum, ecclesia, quis enim conjungeret synonyma, panegyris et ecclesia? Ecclesia, primogenitorum est; panegyris igitur, angelorum." But then he falls into the mistake of making, not only the angels, but the church of the first born ones refer to the myriads, which is equally, as it seems to me, contrary to the linking of each separate term by the conjunction, not to speak of other objections. The Syriac and Vulgate, with those what follow them, Luther and the Elberfeld, avoid either error, and give the true sense with more or less clearness. (Bible Witness & Review 1:316)