Rom. 7:6 KJV (With Strong’s)

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6
But
de (Greek #1161)
but, and, etc.
KJV usage: also, and, but, moreover, now (often unexpressed in English).
Pronounce: deh
Origin: a primary particle (adversative or continuative)
now
nuni (Greek #3570)
just now
KJV usage: now.
Pronounce: noo-nee'
Origin: a prolonged form of 3568 for emphasis
we are delivered
katargeo (Greek #2673)
to be (render) entirely idle (useless), literally or figuratively
KJV usage: abolish, cease, cumber, deliver, destroy, do away, become (make) of no (none, without) effect, fail, loose, bring (come) to nought, put away (down), vanish away, make void.
Pronounce: kat-arg-eh'-o
Origin: from 2596 and 691
from
apo (Greek #575)
"off," i.e. away (from something near), in various senses (of place, time, or relation; literal or figurative)
KJV usage: (X here-)after, ago, at, because of, before, by (the space of), for(-th), from, in, (out) of, off, (up-)on(-ce), since, with. In composition (as a prefix) it usually denotes separation, departure, cessation, completion, reversal, etc.
Pronounce: apo'
Origin: a primary particle
the law
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
nomos (Greek #3551)
law (through the idea of prescriptive usage), genitive case (regulation), specially, (of Moses (including the volume); also of the Gospel), or figuratively (a principle)
KJV usage: law.
Pronounce: nom'-os
Origin: from a primary νέμω (to parcel out, especially food or grazing to animals)
, κthat being dead
apothnesko (Greek #599)
to die off (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: be dead, death, die, lie a-dying, be slain (X with).
Pronounce: ap-oth-nace'-ko
Origin: from 575 and 2348
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apothnesko (Greek #599)
to die off (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: be dead, death, die, lie a-dying, be slain (X with).
Pronounce: ap-oth-nace'-ko
Origin: from 575 and 2348
wherein
en (Greek #1722)
"in," at, (up-)on, by, etc.
KJV usage: about, after, against, + almost, X altogether, among, X as, at, before, between, (here-)by (+ all means), for (... sake of), + give self wholly to, (here-)in(-to, -wardly), X mightily, (because) of, (up-)on, (open-)ly, X outwardly, one, X quickly, X shortly, (speedi-)ly, X that, X there(-in, -on), through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), under, when, where(-with), while, with(-in). Often used in compounds, with substantially the same import; rarely with verbs of motion, and then not to indicate direction, except (elliptically) by a separate (and different) preposition.
Pronounce: en
Origin: a primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), i.e. a relation of rest (intermediate between 1519 and 1537)
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hos (Greek #3739)
the relatively (sometimes demonstrative) pronoun, who, which, what, that
KJV usage: one, (an-, the) other, some, that, what, which, who(-m, -se), etc. See also 3757.
Pronounce: hos
Origin: ἥ (hay), and neuter ὅ (ho) probably a primary word (or perhaps a form of the article 3588)
we were held
katecho (Greek #2722)
to hold down (fast), in various applications (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: have, hold (fast), keep (in memory), let, X make toward, possess, retain, seize on, stay, take, withhold.
Pronounce: kat-ekh'-o
Origin: from 2596 and 2192
; that
hoste (Greek #5620)
so too, i.e. thus therefore (in various relations of consecution, as follow)
KJV usage: (insomuch) as, so that (then), (insomuch) that, therefore, to, wherefore.
Pronounce: hoce'-teh
Origin: from 5613 and 5037
we
hemas (Greek #2248)
us
KJV usage: our, us, we.
Pronounce: hay-mas'
Origin: accusative case plural of 1473
should serve
douleuo (Greek #1398)
to be a slave to (literal or figurative, involuntary or voluntary)
KJV usage: be in bondage, (do) serve(-ice).
Pronounce: dool-yoo'-o
Origin: from 1401
in
en (Greek #1722)
"in," at, (up-)on, by, etc.
KJV usage: about, after, against, + almost, X altogether, among, X as, at, before, between, (here-)by (+ all means), for (... sake of), + give self wholly to, (here-)in(-to, -wardly), X mightily, (because) of, (up-)on, (open-)ly, X outwardly, one, X quickly, X shortly, (speedi-)ly, X that, X there(-in, -on), through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), under, when, where(-with), while, with(-in). Often used in compounds, with substantially the same import; rarely with verbs of motion, and then not to indicate direction, except (elliptically) by a separate (and different) preposition.
Pronounce: en
Origin: a primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), i.e. a relation of rest (intermediate between 1519 and 1537)
newness
kainotes (Greek #2538)
renewal (figuratively)
KJV usage: newness.
Pronounce: kahee-not'-ace
Origin: from 2537
of spirit
pneuma (Greek #4151)
a current of air, i.e. breath (blast) or a breeze; by analogy or figuratively, a spirit, i.e. (human) the rational soul, (by implication) vital principle, mental disposition, etc., or (superhuman) an angel, demon, or (divine) God, Christ's spirit, the Holy Spirit
KJV usage: ghost, life, spirit(-ual, -ually), mind. Compare 5590.
Pronounce: pnyoo'-mah
Origin: from 4154
, and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
not
ou (Greek #3756)
the absolute negative (compare 3361) adverb; no or not
KJV usage: + long, nay, neither, never, no (X man), none, (can-)not, + nothing, + special, un(-worthy), when, + without, + yet but. See also 3364, 3372.
Pronounce: oo
Origin: οὐκ (ook), and (before an aspirate) οὐχ (ookh) a primary word
in the oldness
palaiotes (Greek #3821)
antiquatedness
KJV usage: oldness.
Pronounce: pal-ah-yot'-ace
Origin: from 3820
of the letter
gramma (Greek #1121)
a writing, i.e. a letter, note, epistle, book, etc.; plural learning
KJV usage: bill, learning, letter, scripture, writing, written.
Pronounce: gram'-mah
Origin: from 1125
.
κ
or, being dead to that.

More on:

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Cross References

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But.
that being dead.
or, being dead to that.
serve.
Rom. 1:9• 9For God is my witness, whom I serve with my spirit in the gospel of his Son, that without ceasing I make mention of you always in my prayers; (Rom. 1:9)
;
Rom. 2:27‑29• 27And shall not uncircumcision which is by nature, if it fulfil the law, judge thee, who by the letter and circumcision dost transgress the law?
28For he is not a Jew, which is one outwardly; neither is that circumcision, which is outward in the flesh:
29But he is a Jew, which is one inwardly; and circumcision is that of the heart, in the spirit, and not in the letter; whose praise is not of men, but of God.
(Rom. 2:27‑29)
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Rom. 6:4,11,19,22• 4Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life.
11Likewise reckon ye also yourselves to be dead indeed unto sin, but alive unto God through Jesus Christ our Lord.
19I speak after the manner of men because of the infirmity of your flesh: for as ye have yielded your members servants to uncleanness and to iniquity unto iniquity; even so now yield your members servants to righteousness unto holiness.
22But now being made free from sin, and become servants to God, ye have your fruit unto holiness, and the end everlasting life.
(Rom. 6:4,11,19,22)
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Rom. 12:2• 2And be not conformed to this world: but be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind, that ye may prove what is that good, and acceptable, and perfect, will of God. (Rom. 12:2)
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Ezek. 11:19• 19And I will give them one heart, and I will put a new spirit within you; and I will take the stony heart out of their flesh, and will give them an heart of flesh: (Ezek. 11:19)
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Ezek. 36:26• 26A new heart also will I give you, and a new spirit will I put within you: and I will take away the stony heart out of your flesh, and I will give you an heart of flesh. (Ezek. 36:26)
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2 Cor. 3:6• 6Who also hath made us able ministers of the new testament; not of the letter, but of the spirit: for the letter killeth, but the spirit giveth life. (2 Cor. 3:6)
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2 Cor. 5:17• 17Therefore if any man be in Christ, he is a new creature: old things are passed away; behold, all things are become new. (2 Cor. 5:17)
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Gal. 2:19‑20• 19For I through the law am dead to the law, that I might live unto God.
20I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me: and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave himself for me.
(Gal. 2:19‑20)
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Gal. 6:15• 15For in Christ Jesus neither circumcision availeth any thing, nor uncircumcision, but a new creature. (Gal. 6:15)
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Phil. 3:3• 3For we are the circumcision, which worship God in the spirit, and rejoice in Christ Jesus, and have no confidence in the flesh. (Phil. 3:3)
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Col. 3:10• 10And have put on the new man, which is renewed in knowledge after the image of him that created him: (Col. 3:10)

J. N. Darby Translation

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6
but now we are clear fromf the law, having died in that in which we were held, so that we should serveg in newness of spirit, and not in oldness of letter.

JND Translation Notes

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f
See Note, Gal. 5.4.
g
i.e. serve as bondmen.

W. Kelly Translation

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6
abut now have we got quittance from the law, having died in what we were held so as for us to serve in newness of spirit and not in oldness of letter.

WK Translation Notes

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a
having died in what we were held...this is notoriously inexact, not only in the Authorized Version, but in the received Greek text, where one letter makes the difference between truth and error. The English margin is right. (Exp. of Luke, p. 273)
having died in what we were held: It is scarcely needful to point out how false is the doctrine of the common text and translation, which the margin corrects. If true, Antinomianism would follow, than which nothing is more false and evil. Death to law as well as sin is the fruit of Christ's death and resurrection, and the privilege of the Christian. The law lives to condemn every living soul who pretends to a righteousness of his own. (Bible Treasury 7:297, Notes on Romans, p.101-102)
having died in what we were held: it is high time that the doctrinal error involved in the editions of Beza, and repeated in the text of the Authorized Version, should be expunged. Indeed, it seems to lack the support of a single MS or even version, and to have been a mere conjecture of Beza founded on a misconception of Chrysostom, who really, like every other early ecclesiastical writer, had ἀποθανόντες (not -τος). That the law died is Antinomian in tendency; that the Christian died to law (Gal. 2:19; Col. 2:20, 3:3) is sound and fundamental truth. There is a various reading here (τοῦ θανάτου) supported by Graeco-Latin uncials, and mentioned by Origen as then extant in some Greek copies, and followed by the Vulgate (except the Amiatine, which gives morientes, though it should be mortui), and many Latin fathers. But this is to miss the means of discharge or quittance from the law. Of course the Rhemish, like Wiclif, adheres to the less correct form of the Vulgate, whilst all the other English Versions were right in this till the Authorized Version went farther astray than ever. Erasmus, not in his first but in a later edition, had paved the way for Beza's rash conjecture through a misuse of Chrysostom's comment on the passage. Dr. Bloomfield, in his Recensio Synoptica, v. 580, attributes ἀποθανόντος to accident. But this is beyond controversy a mistake, from not knowing the facts. Had it been found in Greek copies, it might have been so; but we can trace its first appearance to the intentional alteration of Theodore de Bèze. (Bible Treasury 13:350-351)
to serve: do not the Company [of Revisers of 1881] go too far in translating ὤστε δουλεύειν ἠμᾶς, "so that we serve," and not "so as to serve," or "so that we should serve"? (Bible Treasury 13:351)