2 Cor. 5:14 KJV (With Strong’s)

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14
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ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
For
gar (Greek #1063)
properly, assigning a reason (used in argument, explanation or intensification; often with other particles)
KJV usage: and, as, because (that), but, even, for, indeed, no doubt, seeing, then, therefore, verily, what, why, yet.
Pronounce: gar
Origin: a primary particle
the love
agape (Greek #26)
love, i.e. affection or benevolence; specially (plural) a love-feast
KJV usage: (feast of) charity(-ably), dear, love.
Pronounce: ag-ah'-pay
Origin: from 25
of Christ
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
Christos (Greek #5547)
anointed, i.e. the Messiah, an epithet of Jesus
KJV usage: Christ.
Pronounce: khris-tos'
Origin: from 5548
b constraineth
sunecho (Greek #4912)
to hold together, i.e. to compress (the ears, with a crowd or siege) or arrest (a prisoner); figuratively, to compel, perplex, afflict, preoccupy
KJV usage: constrain, hold, keep in, press, lie sick of, stop, be in a strait, straiten, be taken with, throng.
Pronounce: soon-ekh'-o
Origin: from 4862 and 2192
us
hemas (Greek #2248)
us
KJV usage: our, us, we.
Pronounce: hay-mas'
Origin: accusative case plural of 1473
; because
touto (Greek #5124)
that thing
KJV usage: here (-unto), it, partly, self(-same), so, that (intent), the same, there(-fore, -unto), this, thus, where(-fore).
Pronounce: too'-to
Origin: neuter singular nominative or accusative case of 3778
we thus judge
krino (Greek #2919)
by implication, to try, condemn, punish
KJV usage: avenge, conclude, condemn, damn, decree, determine, esteem, judge, go to (sue at the) law, ordain, call in question, sentence to, think.
Pronounce: kree'-no
Origin: properly, to distinguish, i.e. decide (mentally or judicially)
, that
hoti (Greek #3754)
demonstrative, that (sometimes redundant); causative, because
KJV usage: as concerning that, as though, because (that), for (that), how (that), (in) that, though, why.
Pronounce: hot'-ee
Origin: neuter of 3748 as conjunction
if
ei (Greek #1487)
if, whether, that, etc.
KJV usage: forasmuch as, if, that, (al-)though, whether. Often used in connection or composition with other particles, especially as in 1489, 1490, 1499, 1508, 1509, 1512, 1513, 1536, 1537. See also 1437.
Pronounce: i
Origin: a primary particle of conditionality
one
heis (Greek #1520)
a primary numeral; one
KJV usage: a(-n, -ny, certain), + abundantly, man, one (another), only, other, some. See also 1527, 3367, 3391, 3762.
Pronounce: hice
Origin: (including the neuter (etc.) ἕν)
died
apothnesko (Greek #599)
to die off (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: be dead, death, die, lie a-dying, be slain (X with).
Pronounce: ap-oth-nace'-ko
Origin: from 575 and 2348
for
huper (Greek #5228)
"over", i.e. (with the genitive case) of place, above, beyond, across, or causal, for the sake of, instead, regarding; with the accusative case superior to, more than
KJV usage: (+ exceeding, abundantly) above, in (on) behalf of, beyond, by, + very chiefest, concerning, exceeding (above, -ly), for, + very highly, more (than), of, over, on the part of, for sake of, in stead, than, to(-ward), very. In the comparative, it retains many of the above applications.
Pronounce: hoop-er'
Origin: a primary preposition
all
pas (Greek #3956)
apparently a primary word; all, any, every, the whole
KJV usage: all (manner of, means), alway(-s), any (one), X daily, + ever, every (one, way), as many as, + no(-thing), X thoroughly, whatsoever, whole, whosoever.
Pronounce: pas
Origin: including all the forms of declension
, then
ara (Greek #686)
a particle denoting an inference more or less decisive (as follows)
KJV usage: haply, (what) manner (of man), no doubt, perhaps, so be, then, therefore, truly, wherefore. Often used in connection with other particles, especially 1065 or 3767 (after) or 1487 (before). Compare also 687.
Pronounce: ar'-ah
Origin: probably from 142 (through the idea of drawing a conclusion)
c were
apothnesko (Greek #599)
to die off (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: be dead, death, die, lie a-dying, be slain (X with).
Pronounce: ap-oth-nace'-ko
Origin: from 575 and 2348
all
pas (Greek #3956)
apparently a primary word; all, any, every, the whole
KJV usage: all (manner of, means), alway(-s), any (one), X daily, + ever, every (one, way), as many as, + no(-thing), X thoroughly, whatsoever, whole, whosoever.
Pronounce: pas
Origin: including all the forms of declension
dead
apothnesko (Greek #599)
to die off (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: be dead, death, die, lie a-dying, be slain (X with).
Pronounce: ap-oth-nace'-ko
Origin: from 575 and 2348
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Cross References

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Ministry on This Verse

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the love.
2 Cor. 8:8‑9• 8I speak not by commandment, but by occasion of the forwardness of others, and to prove the sincerity of your love.
9For ye know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that, though he was rich, yet for your sakes he became poor, that ye through his poverty might be rich.
(2 Cor. 8:8‑9)
;
SoS 1:4• 4Draw me, we will run after thee: the king hath brought me into his chambers: we will be glad and rejoice in thee, we will remember thy love more than wine: the upright love thee. (SoS 1:4)
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SoS 8:6‑7• 6Set me as a seal upon thine heart, as a seal upon thine arm: for love is strong as death; jealousy is cruel as the grave: the coals thereof are coals of fire, which hath a most vehement flame.
7Many waters cannot quench love, neither can the floods drown it: if a man would give all the substance of his house for love, it would utterly be contemned.
(SoS 8:6‑7)
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Matt. 10:37‑38• 37He that loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me: and he that loveth son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me.
38And he that taketh not his cross, and followeth after me, is not worthy of me.
(Matt. 10:37‑38)
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Luke 7:42‑47• 42And when they had nothing to pay, he frankly forgave them both. Tell me therefore, which of them will love him most?
43Simon answered and said, I suppose that he, to whom he forgave most. And he said unto him, Thou hast rightly judged.
44And he turned to the woman, and said unto Simon, Seest thou this woman? I entered into thine house, thou gavest me no water for my feet: but she hath washed my feet with tears, and wiped them with the hairs of her head.
45Thou gavest me no kiss: but this woman since the time I came in hath not ceased to kiss my feet.
46My head with oil thou didst not anoint: but this woman hath anointed my feet with ointment.
47Wherefore I say unto thee, Her sins, which are many, are forgiven; for she loved much: but to whom little is forgiven, the same loveth little.
(Luke 7:42‑47)
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John 14:21‑23• 21He that hath my commandments, and keepeth them, he it is that loveth me: and he that loveth me shall be loved of my Father, and I will love him, and will manifest myself to him.
22Judas saith unto him, not Iscariot, Lord, how is it that thou wilt manifest thyself unto us, and not unto the world?
23Jesus answered and said unto him, If a man love me, he will keep my words: and my Father will love him, and we will come unto him, and make our abode with him.
(John 14:21‑23)
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John 21:15‑17• 15So when they had dined, Jesus saith to Simon Peter, Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me more than these? He saith unto him, Yea, Lord; thou knowest that I love thee. He saith unto him, Feed my lambs.
16He saith to him again the second time, Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me? He saith unto him, Yea, Lord; thou knowest that I love thee. He saith unto him, Feed my sheep.
17He saith unto him the third time, Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me? Peter was grieved because he said unto him the third time, Lovest thou me? And he said unto him, Lord, thou knowest all things; thou knowest that I love thee. Jesus saith unto him, Feed my sheep.
(John 21:15‑17)
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1 Cor. 16:22• 22If any man love not the Lord Jesus Christ, let him be Anathema Maranatha. (1 Cor. 16:22)
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Eph. 3:18‑19• 18May be able to comprehend with all saints what is the breadth, and length, and depth, and height;
19And to know the love of Christ, which passeth knowledge, that ye might be filled with all the fulness of God.
(Eph. 3:18‑19)
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Eph. 6:24• 24Grace be with all them that love our Lord Jesus Christ in sincerity. Amen. <<To the Ephesians written from Rome, by Tychicus.>> (Eph. 6:24)
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Heb. 6:10• 10For God is not unrighteous to forget your work and labor of love, which ye have showed toward his name, in that ye have ministered to the saints, and do minister. (Heb. 6:10)
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1 Peter 1:8• 8Whom having not seen, ye love; in whom, though now ye see him not, yet believing, ye rejoice with joy unspeakable and full of glory: (1 Peter 1:8)
constraineth.
because.
one.
then.
2 Cor. 3:7,9• 7But if the ministration of death, written and engraven in stones, was glorious, so that the children of Israel could not stedfastly behold the face of Moses for the glory of his countenance; which glory was to be done away:
9For if the ministration of condemnation be glory, much more doth the ministration of righteousness exceed in glory.
(2 Cor. 3:7,9)
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Luke 15:24,32• 24For this my son was dead, and is alive again; he was lost, and is found. And they began to be merry.
32It was meet that we should make merry, and be glad: for this thy brother was dead, and is alive again; and was lost, and is found.
(Luke 15:24,32)
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John 5:25• 25Verily, verily, I say unto you, The hour is coming, and now is, when the dead shall hear the voice of the Son of God: and they that hear shall live. (John 5:25)
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John 11:25• 25Jesus said unto her, I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live: (John 11:25)
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Rom. 5:15• 15But not as the offence, so also is the free gift. For if through the offence of one many be dead, much more the grace of God, and the gift by grace, which is by one man, Jesus Christ, hath abounded unto many. (Rom. 5:15)
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Rom. 14:7‑9• 7For none of us liveth to himself, and no man dieth to himself.
8For whether we live, we live unto the Lord; and whether we die, we die unto the Lord: whether we live therefore, or die, we are the Lord's.
9For to this end Christ both died, and rose, and revived, that he might be Lord both of the dead and living.
(Rom. 14:7‑9)
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Eph. 2:1‑5• 1And you hath he quickened, who were dead in trespasses and sins;
2Wherein in time past ye walked according to the course of this world, according to the prince of the power of the air, the spirit that now worketh in the children of disobedience:
3Among whom also we all had our conversation in times past in the lusts of our flesh, fulfilling the desires of the flesh and of the mind; and were by nature the children of wrath, even as others.
4But God, who is rich in mercy, for his great love wherewith he loved us,
5Even when we were dead in sins, hath quickened us together with Christ, (by grace ye are saved;)
(Eph. 2:1‑5)
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Col. 2:13• 13And you, being dead in your sins and the uncircumcision of your flesh, hath he quickened together with him, having forgiven you all trespasses; (Col. 2:13)
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1 Tim. 5:6• 6But she that liveth in pleasure is dead while she liveth. (1 Tim. 5:6)
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Titus 3:3• 3For we ourselves also were sometimes foolish, disobedient, deceived, serving divers lusts and pleasures, living in malice and envy, hateful, and hating one another. (Titus 3:3)
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1 John 5:19• 19And we know that we are of God, and the whole world lieth in wickedness. (1 John 5:19)
 The love of this same Jesus was strengthened in its active operation in him by the sense of the tribunal which awaits all men. (2 Corinthians 5 by J.N. Darby)
 Christ's death for all is the proof that it was all over with mankind. If He went down in grace to the grave, it was just because they were already there, and none otherwise could be delivered. (Notes on 2 Corinthians 5:12-15 by W. Kelly)
 Death spiritually, not physically, is in question. (Notes on 2 Corinthians 5:12-15 by W. Kelly)

J. N. Darby Translation

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14
For the love of the Christ constrains us, having judged this: that one died for all, then all have diedc;

JND Translation Notes

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c
Or "had died." It is the aorist, and refers to the state Christ's death proved them to be in, in a state of nature. To make it a consequence of Christ's death is, I judge, an utter blunder.

W. Kelly Translation

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14
aFor the love of Christ constraineth us, having judged this, that if one died for all, then they all were dead;

WK Translation Notes

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a
if: The mass of authority and of the highest character omits εἰ "if," which Text.Rec. has with אcorr. C, etc. Vulg. Cop. and Arm. and many fathers. It seems a mere slip to omit it, because of the εἶς following. (Notes on 2 Cor., p.101)
if… then: [Q. The brevity of the remark on the late Bp. Lightfoot's view of these verses, followed by the Revisers', may account for my difficulty in apprehending the evidence and argument against it. May I ask for further clearing of the point? F.]
A. Not having the Bp.'s book at hand, I quote the R.V. which conveys his mind! "For the love of Christ constraineth us; because we thus judge, that one died for all, therefore all died; and he died for all, that they which live should no longer live unto themselves, but unto him who for their sakes died and rose again." Every reflecting believer, I think, must feel that the critical text sounds harsh and inconsequent for want of the εἰ (if) of the vulgar text. And every one used to various readings can see that the εἰ was peculiarly liable here to be dropped, because of the ι immediately preceding and the εἶς immediately following. But accepting the text preferred, wherein does the consequence lie that, because one died for all, therefore they all died, in the sense of dying with Him to sin, the marked privilege of all Christians? This very assumption misled Dean Alford unconsciously into misrepresenting the apostles, when he says that He died for all, that all should live to Him. But this is to change what the apostle wrote in contrasting "all dead" with "those that live." "The all" are men universally; "they that live," are only such as by faith have life in Christ. And this distinction is fundamental and everywhere sustained by the scriptures. The sense therefore is, for "all," death through sin and their sins, for whom nevertheless Christ died as the witness of love toward them in their sad and sinful state. The judgment of love is not merely this but that He died for all, that they that live by faith in Him, which assuredly "all" do not, should no longer be as once when dead, but live to Him who for them died and was raised. For the Saviour whom the Christian owns is not a mere Jewish Messiah ruling Israel and the nations in righteousness peace and happiness on the earth, but a dead and risen Lord with whom we are associated, rejected by the earth but glorified on high, and we in obedient devotedness sharing His sufferings here and waiting to join Him there....
... As these learned men give the sentence, "We thus judge, that one died for all, therefore [illatively] all died," it stands rather unintelligible, and is refuted by the context that follows. Text and translation, if right, lead to no such result. (Bible Treasury N6:47-48)
if: But there are grave questions in verse 14 [of the RV], where, with the critics, they follow the stream of the most ancient manuscripts, and drop the hypothetical particle represented in the Rescript of Paris and many other copies, with the best versions, and, I think, most early citations. But in my judgment, whatever the reading or translation, the Bishop of Durham is not warranted in saying that a death to sin is meant, but death through sin, to interfere with a revelation so foreign to Christendom. It is not true that all men have died with Christ to their former selves and to sin, so as to be therefore bound to lead a new life His life. Nor is this said here; but Christ's dying for all is used as a proof of death in all. There is even a contrast, "they which live," with all who died; and οἰ ζῶντες means not merely that they were alive, but that they lived spiritually, and of these as distinguished from all who died of these only is it added that they should no longer live unto themselves, but unto Him who, for their sakes, died and rose again. The "all" who died are all men, who are naturally lost; "they who live" are the saved who are called to live to the dead and risen Christ, and no longer (as once) to themselves. It is true that these died with Christ to sin; but this is the doctrine of Romans 6 and not of 2 Corinthians 5. It is here death through, and not to, sin; and the making it "to sin" introduces the confusion and heterodoxy evident in Dr. Lightfoot's doctrine. All men have not participated potentially, as he says, in Christ's death; for this is true only of those who live through faith, in contrast with all who died through sin. I doubt not that all are bought; but only believers have in Him redemption through His blood, the forgiveness of their trespasses. The righteousness of God by faith in Jesus Christ is toward all, and upon all that believe. The gospel is not limited, as some would make it; but it is efficacious, though for faith only, unlike what others say. (Bible Treasury 13:367-368)
dead [or, died]: It is contended, as I am aware, that ἀπέθανον can only mean "died," and not "are" or "were dead." But this is an oversight from pressing too technically the aoristic force, so as to clash with English idiom. We may see how harsh it would be to absolutely reduce us to the English preterite by a glance at the same or a kindred word in the case of Jairus' daughter. Even the most servile of translators gives us Matthew 9:18 as "My daughter is just dead" (ἄρτι ἐτελεύτησεν), though he represents verse 24, "For the maid did not die but is sleeping" (οὐ γὰρ απέθανεν); and Mark 5 as "My daughter is dead" (ver.35), but "The child did not die" (ver.39); and Luke 8, "She did not die." Is it not evident that the nature of the case modifies the aorist? Although strictly ἀπέθανεν expresses only the fact that one died, still, death being for the present final, it may be used for, as it implies, the condition of death: if one died, one is dead. But where express precision is intended, the perfect appears as in Luke 8:49, "My daughter is dead," τέθνηκεν. Yet in verses 52,53, it is in both cases ἀπέανεν. To say here "She did not die," and "she did die," is mere pedantry, not good English; and in this connection the Authorized Version more fittingly gives "she is not dead," and "she was dead." It is not that the aorist is ever used with impropriety, or confounded with the perfect; but that the fact in Greek is enough, where English gives the state. (Notes on 2 Cor., p.104-105)