1 Thess. 5:8 KJV (With Strong’s)

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8
But
de (Greek #1161)
but, and, etc.
KJV usage: also, and, but, moreover, now (often unexpressed in English).
Pronounce: deh
Origin: a primary particle (adversative or continuative)
let
nepho (Greek #3525)
of uncertain affinity: to abstain from wine (keep sober), i.e. (figuratively) be discreet
KJV usage: be sober, watch.
Pronounce: nay'-fo
us
hemeis (Greek #2249)
we (only used when emphatic)
KJV usage: us, we (ourselves).
Pronounce: hay-mice'
Origin: nominative plural of 1473
, who are
on (Greek #5607)
and the neuter ὄν (on) present participle of 1510; being
KJV usage: be, come, have.
Pronounce: oan
Origin: οὖσα (oo'-sah)
of the day
hemera (Greek #2250)
day, i.e. (literally) the time space between dawn and dark, or the whole 24 hours (but several days were usually reckoned by the Jews as inclusive of the parts of both extremes); figuratively, a period (always defined more or less clearly by the context)
KJV usage: age, + alway, (mid-)day (by day, (-ly)), + for ever, judgment, (day) time, while, years.
Pronounce: hay-mer'-ah
Origin: feminine (with 5610 implied) of a derivative of ἧμαι (to sit; akin to the base of 1476) meaning tame, i.e. gentle
, be sober
nepho (Greek #3525)
of uncertain affinity: to abstain from wine (keep sober), i.e. (figuratively) be discreet
KJV usage: be sober, watch.
Pronounce: nay'-fo
, putting on
enduo (Greek #1746)
to invest with clothing (literally or figuratively)
KJV usage: array, clothe (with), endue, have (put) on.
Pronounce: en-doo'-o
Origin: from 1722 and 1416 (in the sense of sinking into a garment)
the breastplate
thorax (Greek #2382)
the chest ("thorax"), i.e. (by implication) a corslet
KJV usage: breast-plate.
Pronounce: tho'-rax
Origin: of uncertain affinity
m of faith
pistis (Greek #4102)
persuasion, i.e. credence; moral conviction (of religious truth, or the truthfulness of God or a religious teacher), especially reliance upon Christ for salvation; abstractly, constancy in such profession; by extension, the system of religious (Gospel) truth itself
KJV usage: assurance, belief, believe, faith, fidelity.
Pronounce: pis'-tis
Origin: from 3982
and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
love
agape (Greek #26)
love, i.e. affection or benevolence; specially (plural) a love-feast
KJV usage: (feast of) charity(-ably), dear, love.
Pronounce: ag-ah'-pay
Origin: from 25
; and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
for an helmet
perikephalaia (Greek #4030)
encirclement of the head, i.e. a helmet
KJV usage: helmet.
Pronounce: per-ee-kef-al-ah'-yah
Origin: feminine of a compound of 4012 and 2776
, the hope
elpis (Greek #1680)
expectation (abstractly or concretely) or confidence
KJV usage: faith, hope.
Pronounce: el-pece'
Origin: from a primary ἔλπω (to anticipate, usually with pleasure)
of salvation
soteria (Greek #4991)
rescue or safety (physically or morally)
KJV usage: deliver, health, salvation, save, saving.
Pronounce: so-tay-ree'-ah
Origin: feminine of a derivative of 4990 as (properly, abstract) noun
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Cross References

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Ministry on This Verse

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who.
the breastplate.
the hope.
Job 19:23‑27• 23Oh that my words were now written! oh that they were printed in a book!
24That they were graven with an iron pen and lead in the rock for ever!
25For I know that my redeemer liveth, and that he shall stand at the latter day upon the earth:
26And though after my skin worms destroy this body, yet in my flesh shall I see God:
27Whom I shall see for myself, and mine eyes shall behold, and not another; though my reins be consumed within me.
(Job 19:23‑27)
;
Psa. 42:5,11• 5Why art thou cast down, O my soul? and why art thou disquieted in me? hope thou in God: for I shall yet praise him for the help of his countenance.
11Why art thou cast down, O my soul? and why art thou disquieted within me? hope thou in God: for I shall yet praise him, who is the health of my countenance, and my God.
(Psa. 42:5,11)
;
Psa. 43:5• 5Why art thou cast down, O my soul? and why art thou disquieted within me? hope in God: for I shall yet praise him, who is the health of my countenance, and my God. (Psa. 43:5)
;
Lam. 3:26• 26It is good that a man should both hope and quietly wait for the salvation of the Lord. (Lam. 3:26)
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Rom. 5:2‑5• 2By whom also we have access by faith into this grace wherein we stand, and rejoice in hope of the glory of God.
3And not only so, but we glory in tribulations also: knowing that tribulation worketh patience;
4And patience, experience; and experience, hope:
5And hope maketh not ashamed; because the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Ghost which is given unto us.
(Rom. 5:2‑5)
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Rom. 8:24‑25• 24For we are saved by hope: but hope that is seen is not hope: for what a man seeth, why doth he yet hope for?
25But if we hope for that we see not, then do we with patience wait for it.
(Rom. 8:24‑25)
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1 Cor. 13:13• 13And now abideth faith, hope, charity, these three; but the greatest of these is charity. (1 Cor. 13:13)
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Gal. 5:5• 5For we through the Spirit wait for the hope of righteousness by faith. (Gal. 5:5)
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2 Thess. 2:16• 16Now our Lord Jesus Christ himself, and God, even our Father, which hath loved us, and hath given us everlasting consolation and good hope through grace, (2 Thess. 2:16)
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Heb. 6:19• 19Which hope we have as an anchor of the soul, both sure and stedfast, and which entereth into that within the veil; (Heb. 6:19)
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Heb. 10:35‑36• 35Cast not away therefore your confidence, which hath great recompence of reward.
36For ye have need of patience, that, after ye have done the will of God, ye might receive the promise.
(Heb. 10:35‑36)
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1 Peter 1:3‑5,13• 3Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, which according to his abundant mercy hath begotten us again unto a lively hope by the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead,
4To an inheritance incorruptible, and undefiled, and that fadeth not away, reserved in heaven for you,
5Who are kept by the power of God through faith unto salvation ready to be revealed in the last time.
13Wherefore gird up the loins of your mind, be sober, and hope to the end for the grace that is to be brought unto you at the revelation of Jesus Christ;
(1 Peter 1:3‑5,13)
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1 John 3:1‑3• 1Behold, what manner of love the Father hath bestowed upon us, that we should be called the sons of God: therefore the world knoweth us not, because it knew him not.
2Beloved, now are we the sons of God, and it doth not yet appear what we shall be: but we know that, when he shall appear, we shall be like him; for we shall see him as he is.
3And every man that hath this hope in him purifieth himself, even as he is pure.
(1 John 3:1‑3)
 He has the breastplate of faith and love; he goes straight forward, therefore, against the enemy. He has the hope of this glorious salvation, which will bring him entire deliverance, as his helmet; so that he can lift up his head without fear in the midst of danger. (1 Thessalonians 5 by J.N. Darby)
 Hope fixes our eyes especially on Christ, who is coming to bring us into the enjoyment of glory with Himself. (1 Thessalonians 5 by J.N. Darby)
 It must be understood that "salvation" here is used in the final or complete sense when the body will share the application of that gracious power which has already dealt with the soul. (On 1 Thessalonians 5:1-11 by W. Kelly)
 the arms here, as but young Christians were immediately addressed, are not offensive, but defensive only: the three characteristics of their life here below, faith, love, and hope. We have seen how they are used in chap. 1 of this epistle; here they re-appear in the last. (On 1 Thessalonians 5:1-11 by W. Kelly)
 "salvation " here is used in the final or complete sense when the body will share the application of that gracious power which has already dealt with the soul. (On 1 Thessalonians 5:1-11 by W. Kelly)

J. N. Darby Translation

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8
but *we* being of the day, let us be sober, putting on the breastplate of faith and love, and as helmet the hopea of salvation;

JND Translation Notes

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a
Compare 1 Cor. 13.13. "faith, hope, love, these three things."

W. Kelly Translation

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8
abut we being of day, let us be sober, putting on a breastplate of faith and love, and hope of salvation as helmet.

WK Translation Notes

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a
being of day: To what is the Christian exhorted? It is not exactly, as in the Authorized Version after the Vulgate, etc., "Let us who are of the day," which would require the article, but let us as being of the day be sober, having put on a breastplate of faith and love, and hope of salvation as helmet. (It may be worth while here to remark that the reason for the anarthrous structure of the phraseology is not what Bishop Ellicott assigned, following Winer's Greek New Testament Grammar, namely, that as well-known terms they dispense with the article. Now there may be cases where with a connected word the phrase is virtually a proper name, which is sufficiently designative to do without the article unless special reasons require it. But, as a general rule, the facts do not bear out the conclusion, and the familiar words in question fall under the ordinary principle that, when they are intended to present an object before the mind, the article must be used; whereas it is dropped in order to characterize or predicate simply. The usage is not arbitrary nor careless, but correct in the New Testament and all exact writings. Sometimes the article might or might not be inserted and both be true; but the force is never precisely the same.) (Epist. to the Thessalonians, p.60)