Camp

Boyd’s Bible Dictionary:

[ENCAMPMENT.]

Concise Bible Dictionary:

“The Camp” was a common expression used of Israel in the wilderness: the tabernacle in the center and the twelve tribes, each in its appointed place, arranged around it, composed the camp. Everything was ordered of God, and each tribe must pitch its tents in the places appointed for them (Num. 2). As we might have expected, Moses, Aaron, and the priests were nearest to the door of the Tabernacle, and the Levites surrounded the three other sides.
The order in which the tribes were to march was also specified. In Psalm 80:22Before Ephraim and Benjamin and Manasseh stir up thy strength, and come and save us. (Psalm 80:2) we read “Before Ephraim, and Benjamin, and Manasseh, stir up thy strength, and come and save us.” This alludes to those three being the tribes which immediately followed the Ark, the symbol of God’s presence. It will be seen that the tribes were grouped under four leaders, each being called a camp. They moved in the order given in Num. 10—
JUDAH, with Issachar and Zebulun,
The GERSHONITES and the MERARITES with the Tabernacle,
REUBEN, with Simeon and Gad,
The KOHATHITES with the “sanctuary,”
EPHRAIM, with Manasseh and Benjamin,
DAN, with Asher and Naphtali.
Certain defilements shut a person out of the camp until he was cleansed, and many things had to be carried outside as being unfit for the place in the midst of which God had His dwelling-place. When the camp itself had become defiled by the golden calf, Moses “took the tabernacle and pitched it without the camp.... and called it the tabernacle of the congregation.” This was not really “the tabernacle,” for it had not at that time been erected. The word used signifies “the tent,” and it was doubtless a tent anticipatory of the tabernacle significantly pitched by Moses outside the camp, to show that God’s dwelling could not be where there was an idol, for it is added, “Every one which sought the Lord went out unto the tabernacle of the congregation, which was without the camp” (Ex. 33:77And Moses took the tabernacle, and pitched it without the camp, afar off from the camp, and called it the Tabernacle of the congregation. And it came to pass, that every one which sought the Lord went out unto the tabernacle of the congregation, which was without the camp. (Exodus 33:7)).
The bodies of the beasts whose blood was brought into the sanctuary by the high priests for sin were burned without the camp (Ex. 29:1414But the flesh of the bullock, and his skin, and his dung, shalt thou burn with fire without the camp: it is a sin offering. (Exodus 29:14); Lev. 4:11-1211And the skin of the bullock, and all his flesh, with his head, and with his legs, and his inwards, and his dung, 12Even the whole bullock shall he carry forth without the camp unto a clean place, where the ashes are poured out, and burn him on the wood with fire: where the ashes are poured out shall he be burnt. (Leviticus 4:11‑12); Heb. 13:1111For the bodies of those beasts, whose blood is brought into the sanctuary by the high priest for sin, are burned without the camp. (Hebrews 13:11)). With this is linked the fact that Jesus also “suffered without the gate” (of Jerusalem, which then answered to the camp); on which is based the exhortation to Christians, “Let us go forth therefore unto him without the camp, bearing his reproach” (Heb. 13:12-1312Wherefore Jesus also, that he might sanctify the people with his own blood, suffered without the gate. 13Let us go forth therefore unto him without the camp, bearing his reproach. (Hebrews 13:12‑13)). The whole earthly religious system adapted to the natural man, as Judaism of old, answers now to “the camp” which Christians are exhorted to leave. Such systems, Judaism and Christendom, stand in direct contrast to the heavenly and spiritual character of the church of God. The camp in Revelation 20:99And they went up on the breadth of the earth, and compassed the camp of the saints about, and the beloved city: and fire came down from God out of heaven, and devoured them. (Revelation 20:9) refers to the nation of Israel when again gathered into the land of Palestine. There is no “camp” on earth for the church.

From Anstey’s Doctrinal Definitions:

This refers to the religious system of Judaism which the Lord ordained for Israel (Ex. 25-31; Heb. 13:1313Let us go forth therefore unto him without the camp, bearing his reproach. (Hebrews 13:13)). It is predominantly an outward way of approaching God in worship through ceremonial forms and rituals. It was an earthly order of religious practice that was given to an earthly company of people in Old Testament times, who had earthly hopes and an earthly destiny in the land of Canaan. “The camp,” therefore, refers to Judaism and all of its related principles and practices. It stands in stark contrast to “the new and living way” of worship in Christianity (Heb. 10:19-2219Having therefore, brethren, boldness to enter into the holiest by the blood of Jesus, 20By a new and living way, which he hath consecrated for us, through the veil, that is to say, his flesh; 21And having an high priest over the house of God; 22Let us draw near with a true heart in full assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled from an evil conscience, and our bodies washed with pure water. (Hebrews 10:19‑22)), which is a heavenly way of approach to God “in spirit and in truth(John 4:23-2423But the hour cometh, and now is, when the true worshippers shall worship the Father in spirit and in truth: for the Father seeketh such to worship him. 24God is a Spirit: and they that worship him must worship him in spirit and in truth. (John 4:23‑24)) ordained for a heavenly company of believers, who have heavenly hopes and a heavenly destiny.
“The camp” is something which the Lord is presently outside of today in these Christian times (Heb. 13:1313Let us go forth therefore unto him without the camp, bearing his reproach. (Hebrews 13:13)). The responsible leaders of that Jewish system cast Him out of it and killed Him! (Matt. 21:37-3937But last of all he sent unto them his son, saying, They will reverence my son. 38But when the husbandmen saw the son, they said among themselves, This is the heir; come, let us kill him, and let us seize on his inheritance. 39And they caught him, and cast him out of the vineyard, and slew him. (Matthew 21:37‑39); John 1:1111He came unto his own, and his own received him not. (John 1:11); Acts 3:13-1513The God of Abraham, and of Isaac, and of Jacob, the God of our fathers, hath glorified his Son Jesus; whom ye delivered up, and denied him in the presence of Pilate, when he was determined to let him go. 14But ye denied the Holy One and the Just, and desired a murderer to be granted unto you; 15And killed the Prince of life, whom God hath raised from the dead; whereof we are witnesses. (Acts 3:13‑15); Heb. 13:1212Wherefore Jesus also, that he might sanctify the people with his own blood, suffered without the gate. (Hebrews 13:12)) In resurrection, the Lord has remained outside that system and will continue to do so “until the fulness of the Gentiles be come in” (Rom. 11:2525For I would not, brethren, that ye should be ignorant of this mystery, lest ye should be wise in your own conceits; that blindness in part is happened to Israel, until the fulness of the Gentiles be come in. (Romans 11:25)). At the present, His gathering believers around Himself for worship, ministry, and Christian fellowship in the place of His appointment outside the camp (Heb. 13:13-1613Let us go forth therefore unto him without the camp, bearing his reproach. 14For here have we no continuing city, but we seek one to come. 15By him therefore let us offer the sacrifice of praise to God continually, that is, the fruit of our lips giving thanks to his name. 16But to do good and to communicate forget not: for with such sacrifices God is well pleased. (Hebrews 13:13‑16); Matt. 18:2020For where two or three are gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them. (Matthew 18:20)). This, the writer of Hebrews tells us, will be along the lines of the new and living way in Christianity. The point in Hebrews 13:9-169Be not carried about with divers and strange doctrines. For it is a good thing that the heart be established with grace; not with meats, which have not profited them that have been occupied therein. 10We have an altar, whereof they have no right to eat which serve the tabernacle. 11For the bodies of those beasts, whose blood is brought into the sanctuary by the high priest for sin, are burned without the camp. 12Wherefore Jesus also, that he might sanctify the people with his own blood, suffered without the gate. 13Let us go forth therefore unto him without the camp, bearing his reproach. 14For here have we no continuing city, but we seek one to come. 15By him therefore let us offer the sacrifice of praise to God continually, that is, the fruit of our lips giving thanks to his name. 16But to do good and to communicate forget not: for with such sacrifices God is well pleased. (Hebrews 13:9‑16) is that God does not want the two systems of worship (Judaism and Christianity) to be mixed (Heb. 13:1010We have an altar, whereof they have no right to eat which serve the tabernacle. (Hebrews 13:10)). The passage tells us that Judaism is an order of things which Christians are to separate from, because the Lord is not identifying Himself with it today. They are told to “go forth unto Him without the camp” and to offer their sacrifice of praise to God” there where He is—without the use of all the outward means of worship used in Judaism (Heb. 13:1515By him therefore let us offer the sacrifice of praise to God continually, that is, the fruit of our lips giving thanks to his name. (Hebrews 13:15)).
The problem is that the church denominations in Christendom have not understood the teaching in Hebrews 13:9-169Be not carried about with divers and strange doctrines. For it is a good thing that the heart be established with grace; not with meats, which have not profited them that have been occupied therein. 10We have an altar, whereof they have no right to eat which serve the tabernacle. 11For the bodies of those beasts, whose blood is brought into the sanctuary by the high priest for sin, are burned without the camp. 12Wherefore Jesus also, that he might sanctify the people with his own blood, suffered without the gate. 13Let us go forth therefore unto him without the camp, bearing his reproach. 14For here have we no continuing city, but we seek one to come. 15By him therefore let us offer the sacrifice of praise to God continually, that is, the fruit of our lips giving thanks to his name. 16But to do good and to communicate forget not: for with such sacrifices God is well pleased. (Hebrews 13:9‑16). Nor has the instruction of Hebrews 9:8-9, 23-248The Holy Ghost this signifying, that the way into the holiest of all was not yet made manifest, while as the first tabernacle was yet standing: 9Which was a figure for the time then present, in which were offered both gifts and sacrifices, that could not make him that did the service perfect, as pertaining to the conscience; (Hebrews 9:8‑9)
23It was therefore necessary that the patterns of things in the heavens should be purified with these; but the heavenly things themselves with better sacrifices than these. 24For Christ is not entered into the holy places made with hands, which are the figures of the true; but into heaven itself, now to appear in the presence of God for us: (Hebrews 9:23‑24)
been given its due consideration, which says that the Old Testament tabernacle system (“the camp”) is a figure of the true sanctuary in which Christians can now worship by the Spirit. Instead of seeing it as a figure, Christians have used the tabernacle system as a pattern for their churches, and have borrowed many things in a literal sense from that Judaic order for their places of worship and their religious services.
The following is a short list of some of the things that have been borrowed from Judaism in the formation of modern church groups:
•  The use of literal ornate temples and cathedrals for places of worship.
•  A special caste of ordained men who officiate on behalf of the congregation.
•  The use of musical instruments to aid worship.
•  The use of a choir.
•  The use of incense to create a religious atmosphere.
•  The use of robes on the “Ministers” and choir members.
•  The use of a literal (non-sacrificial) altar.
•  The practice of tithing.
•  The observance of holy days and religious festivals.
•  A registry of names of persons in the congregation.
Judaic worship appeals to the natural senses, being an earthly and a sensual religion. In fact, a person does not even need to be born again to appreciate and enjoy it! It is stimulated by:
It is true that many of these Judaic things have been altered somewhat by the churches of Christendom to fit into a Christian context, but these places still have the trappings of Judaism. In fact, sadly, this Jewish order has permeated the Church. Much of it has been around in Christianity for so long that it has become accepted by the masses as God’s ideal. Most people today think that it is good and right to have this Judeo-Christian mixture. Unfortunately, the mixing of these two orders of approach to God has destroyed the distinctness of each, and what has resulted from the mixture is something that is not real Judaism, nor is it real Christianity. Both have been spoiled (Luke 5:36-3936And he spake also a parable unto them; No man putteth a piece of a new garment upon an old; if otherwise, then both the new maketh a rent, and the piece that was taken out of the new agreeth not with the old. 37And no man putteth new wine into old bottles; else the new wine will burst the bottles, and be spilled, and the bottles shall perish. 38But new wine must be put into new bottles; and both are preserved. 39No man also having drunk old wine straightway desireth new: for he saith, The old is better. (Luke 5:36‑39)).
In Christianity, we offer up spiritual sacrifices” aided by the Holy Spirit (1 Peter 2:55Ye also, as lively stones, are built up a spiritual house, an holy priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacrifices, acceptable to God by Jesus Christ. (1 Peter 2:5); Phil. 3:33For we are the circumcision, which worship God in the spirit, and rejoice in Christ Jesus, and have no confidence in the flesh. (Philippians 3:3)) in contrast to the carnal ordinances” in the Judaic order (Heb. 9:1010Which stood only in meats and drinks, and divers washings, and carnal ordinances, imposed on them until the time of reformation. (Hebrews 9:10)). Christian sacrifices of praise are done in the immediate presence of God within the veil (Heb. 10:19-20; 13:1519Having therefore, brethren, boldness to enter into the holiest by the blood of Jesus, 20By a new and living way, which he hath consecrated for us, through the veil, that is to say, his flesh; (Hebrews 10:19‑20)
15By him therefore let us offer the sacrifice of praise to God continually, that is, the fruit of our lips giving thanks to his name. (Hebrews 13:15)
). This is a privilege that Israel did not have. It is significant that we do not find anywhere in the book of the Acts, or in the epistles, that Christians worshipped the Lord in their meetings by using rituals and outward mechanical means, such as musical instruments. The only two mediums that Christians are found using in worship in Scripture are their “hearts” (Col. 3:1616Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom; teaching and admonishing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing with grace in your hearts to the Lord. (Colossians 3:16); Eph. 5:1919Speaking to yourselves in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody in your heart to the Lord; (Ephesians 5:19)) and their “lips” (Hebrews 13:1515By him therefore let us offer the sacrifice of praise to God continually, that is, the fruit of our lips giving thanks to his name. (Hebrews 13:15)). Since Christian worship is “in spirit and in truth” (John 4:2424God is a Spirit: and they that worship him must worship him in spirit and in truth. (John 4:24)), we can sit quietly in a chair, and there can be produced in our souls and spirits true praise to God by the Holy Spirit. This is true heavenly (Christian) worship, for in heaven there will be no need for musical instruments and rituals in the worship of God, as in Judaism. Thus, the Christian’s place of worship is:
It is not that the Judaic order of worship is evil; it is not. It was set up and ordained of God for Israel. What Scripture teaches is that it is not for the Church. When Israel will be restored and blessed in their land in a coming day (the Millennium), they will rightly worship God after that Judaic order (Ezek. 43-46).