Rom. 5:1 KJV (With Strong’s)

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Therefore
oun (Greek #3767)
(adverbially) certainly, or (conjunctionally) accordingly
KJV usage: and (so, truly), but, now (then), so (likewise then), then, therefore, verily, wherefore.
Pronounce: oon
Origin: apparently a primary word
p being justified
dikaioo (Greek #1344)
to render (i.e. show or regard as) just or innocent
KJV usage: free, justify(-ier), be righteous.
Pronounce: dik-ah-yo'-o
Origin: from 1342
by
ek (Greek #1537)
or ἐξ (ex) a primary preposition denoting origin (the point whence action or motion proceeds), from, out (of place, time, or cause; literal or figurative; direct or remote)
KJV usage: after, among, X are, at, betwixt(-yond), by (the means of), exceedingly, (+ abundantly above), for(- th), from (among, forth, up), + grudgingly, + heartily, X heavenly, X hereby, + very highly, in, ...ly, (because, by reason) of, off (from), on, out among (from, of), over, since, X thenceforth, through, X unto, X vehemently, with(-out). Often used in composition, with the same general import; often of completion.
Pronounce: ek
faith
pistis (Greek #4102)
persuasion, i.e. credence; moral conviction (of religious truth, or the truthfulness of God or a religious teacher), especially reliance upon Christ for salvation; abstractly, constancy in such profession; by extension, the system of religious (Gospel) truth itself
KJV usage: assurance, belief, believe, faith, fidelity.
Pronounce: pis'-tis
Origin: from 3982
, we have
echo (Greek #2192)
(used in certain tenses only) a primary verb; to hold (used in very various applications, literally or figuratively, direct or remote; such as possession; ability, contiuity, relation, or condition)
KJV usage: be (able, X hold, possessed with), accompany, + begin to amend, can(+ -not), X conceive, count, diseased, do + eat, + enjoy, + fear, following, have, hold, keep, + lack, + go to law, lie, + must needs, + of necessity, + need, next, + recover, + reign, + rest, + return, X sick, take for, + tremble, + uncircumcised, use.
Pronounce: ekh'-o
Origin: σχέω (skheh'-o)
peace
eirene (Greek #1515)
peace (literally or figuratively); by implication, prosperity
KJV usage: one, peace, quietness, rest, + set at one again.
Pronounce: i-ray'-nay
Origin: probably from a primary verb εἴρω (to join)
with
pros (Greek #4314)
a preposition of direction; forward to, i.e. toward (with the genitive case, the side of, i.e. pertaining to; with the dative case, by the side of, i.e. near to; usually with the accusative case, the place, time, occasion, or respect, which is the destination of the relation, i.e. whither or for which it is predicated)
KJV usage: about, according to , against, among, at, because of, before, between, (where-)by, for, X at thy house, in, for intent, nigh unto, of, which pertain to, that, to (the end that), X together, to (you) -ward, unto, with(-in). In the comparative case, it denotes essentially the same applications, namely, motion towards, accession to, or nearness at.
Pronounce: pros
Origin: a strengthened form of 4253
God
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
theos (Greek #2316)
a deity, especially (with 3588) the supreme Divinity; figuratively, a magistrate; by Hebraism, very
KJV usage: X exceeding, God, god(-ly, -ward).
Pronounce: theh'-os
Origin: of uncertain affinity
through
dia (Greek #1223)
through (in very wide applications, local, causal, or occasional)
KJV usage: after, always, among, at, to avoid, because of (that), briefly, by, for (cause) ... fore, from, in, by occasion of, of, by reason of, for sake, that, thereby, therefore, X though, through(-out), to, wherefore, with (-in). In composition it retains the same general importance.
Pronounce: dee-ah'
Origin: a primary preposition denoting the channel of an act
our
hemon (Greek #2257)
of (or from) us
KJV usage: our (company), us, we.
Pronounce: hay-mone'
Origin: genitive case plural of 1473
Lord
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
kurios (Greek #2962)
supreme in authority, i.e. (as noun) controller; by implication, Master (as a respectful title)
KJV usage: God, Lord, master, Sir.
Pronounce: koo'-ree-os
Origin: from κῦρος (supremacy)
Jesus
Iesous (Greek #2424)
Jesus (i.e. Jehoshua), the name of our Lord and two (three) other Israelites
KJV usage: Jesus.
Pronounce: ee-ay-sooce'
Origin: of Hebrew origin (03091)
Christ
Christos (Greek #5547)
anointed, i.e. the Messiah, an epithet of Jesus
KJV usage: Christ.
Pronounce: khris-tos'
Origin: from 5548
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Cross References

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1:  Being justified by faith, we have peace with God;
2-7:  and joy in our hope;
8-9:  that since we were reconciled by his blood, when we were enemies;
10-11:  we shall much more be saved, being reconciled.
12-16:  As sin and death came by Adam;
17-19:  so much more righteousness and life by Jesus Christ.
20-21:  Where sin abounded, grace did superabound.
being.
Rom. 5:9,18• 9Much more then, being now justified by his blood, we shall be saved from wrath through him.
18Therefore as by the offence of one judgment came upon all men to condemnation; even so by the righteousness of one the free gift came upon all men unto justification of life.
(Rom. 5:9,18)
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Rom. 1:17• 17For therein is the righteousness of God revealed from faith to faith: as it is written, The just shall live by faith. (Rom. 1:17)
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Rom. 3:22,26‑28,30• 22Even the righteousness of God which is by faith of Jesus Christ unto all and upon all them that believe: for there is no difference:
26To declare, I say, at this time his righteousness: that he might be just, and the justifier of him which believeth in Jesus.
27Where is boasting then? It is excluded. By what law? of works? Nay: but by the law of faith.
28Therefore we conclude that a man is justified by faith without the deeds of the law.
30Seeing it is one God, which shall justify the circumcision by faith, and uncircumcision through faith.
(Rom. 3:22,26‑28,30)
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Rom. 4:5,24‑25• 5But to him that worketh not, but believeth on him that justifieth the ungodly, his faith is counted for righteousness.
24But for us also, to whom it shall be imputed, if we believe on him that raised up Jesus our Lord from the dead;
25Who was delivered for our offences, and was raised again for our justification.
(Rom. 4:5,24‑25)
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Rom. 9:30• 30What shall we say then? That the Gentiles, which followed not after righteousness, have attained to righteousness, even the righteousness which is of faith. (Rom. 9:30)
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Rom. 10:10• 10For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation. (Rom. 10:10)
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Hab. 2:4• 4Behold, his soul which is lifted up is not upright in him: but the just shall live by his faith. (Hab. 2:4)
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John 3:16‑18• 16For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.
17For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved.
18He that believeth on him is not condemned: but he that believeth not is condemned already, because he hath not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God.
(John 3:16‑18)
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John 5:24• 24Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life. (John 5:24)
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Acts 13:38‑39• 38Be it known unto you therefore, men and brethren, that through this man is preached unto you the forgiveness of sins:
39And by him all that believe are justified from all things, from which ye could not be justified by the law of Moses.
(Acts 13:38‑39)
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Gal. 2:16• 16Knowing that a man is not justified by the works of the law, but by the faith of Jesus Christ, even we have believed in Jesus Christ, that we might be justified by the faith of Christ, and not by the works of the law: for by the works of the law shall no flesh be justified. (Gal. 2:16)
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Gal. 3:11‑14,25• 11But that no man is justified by the law in the sight of God, it is evident: for, The just shall live by faith.
12And the law is not of faith: but, The man that doeth them shall live in them.
13Christ hath redeemed us from the curse of the law, being made a curse for us: for it is written, Cursed is every one that hangeth on a tree:
14That the blessing of Abraham might come on the Gentiles through Jesus Christ; that we might receive the promise of the Spirit through faith.
25But after that faith is come, we are no longer under a schoolmaster.
(Gal. 3:11‑14,25)
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Gal. 5:4‑6• 4Christ is become of no effect unto you, whosoever of you are justified by the law; ye are fallen from grace.
5For we through the Spirit wait for the hope of righteousness by faith.
6For in Jesus Christ neither circumcision availeth any thing, nor uncircumcision; but faith which worketh by love.
(Gal. 5:4‑6)
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Phil. 3:9• 9And be found in him, not having mine own righteousness, which is of the law, but that which is through the faith of Christ, the righteousness which is of God by faith: (Phil. 3:9)
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James 2:23‑26• 23And the scripture was fulfilled which saith, Abraham believed God, and it was imputed unto him for righteousness: and he was called the Friend of God.
24Ye see then how that by works a man is justified, and not by faith only.
25Likewise also was not Rahab the harlot justified by works, when she had received the messengers, and had sent them out another way?
26For as the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead also.
(James 2:23‑26)
we have.
Rom. 5:10• 10For if, when we were enemies, we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son, much more, being reconciled, we shall be saved by his life. (Rom. 5:10)
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Rom. 1:7• 7To all that be in Rome, beloved of God, called to be saints: Grace to you and peace from God our Father, and the Lord Jesus Christ. (Rom. 1:7)
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Rom. 10:15• 15And how shall they preach, except they be sent? as it is written, How beautiful are the feet of them that preach the gospel of peace, and bring glad tidings of good things! (Rom. 10:15)
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Rom. 14:17• 17For the kingdom of God is not meat and drink; but righteousness, and peace, and joy in the Holy Ghost. (Rom. 14:17)
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Rom. 15:13,33• 13Now the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, that ye may abound in hope, through the power of the Holy Ghost.
33Now the God of peace be with you all. Amen.
(Rom. 15:13,33)
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Job 21:21• 21For what pleasure hath he in his house after him, when the number of his months is cut off in the midst? (Job 21:21)
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Psa. 85:8‑10• 8I will hear what God the Lord will speak: for he will speak peace unto his people, and to his saints: but let them not turn again to folly.
9Surely his salvation is nigh them that fear him; that glory may dwell in our land.
10Mercy and truth are met together; righteousness and peace have kissed each other.
(Psa. 85:8‑10)
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Psa. 122:6• 6Pray for the peace of Jerusalem: they shall prosper that love thee. (Psa. 122:6)
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Isa. 27:5• 5Or let him take hold of my strength, that he may make peace with me; and he shall make peace with me. (Isa. 27:5)
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Isa. 32:17• 17And the work of righteousness shall be peace; and the effect of righteousness quietness and assurance for ever. (Isa. 32:17)
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Isa. 54:13• 13And all thy children shall be taught of the Lord; and great shall be the peace of thy children. (Isa. 54:13)
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Isa. 55:12• 12For ye shall go out with joy, and be led forth with peace: the mountains and the hills shall break forth before you into singing, and all the trees of the field shall clap their hands. (Isa. 55:12)
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Isa. 57:19‑21• 19I create the fruit of the lips; Peace, peace to him that is far off, and to him that is near, saith the Lord; and I will heal him.
20But the wicked are like the troubled sea, when it cannot rest, whose waters cast up mire and dirt.
21There is no peace, saith my God, to the wicked.
(Isa. 57:19‑21)
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Zech. 6:13• 13Even he shall build the temple of the Lord; and he shall bear the glory, and shall sit and rule upon his throne; and he shall be a priest upon his throne: and the counsel of peace shall be between them both. (Zech. 6:13)
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Luke 2:14• 14Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men. (Luke 2:14)
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Luke 10:5‑6• 5And into whatsoever house ye enter, first say, Peace be to this house.
6And if the son of peace be there, your peace shall rest upon it: if not, it shall turn to you again.
(Luke 10:5‑6)
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Luke 19:38,42• 38Saying, Blessed be the King that cometh in the name of the Lord: peace in heaven, and glory in the highest.
42Saying, If thou hadst known, even thou, at least in this thy day, the things which belong unto thy peace! but now they are hid from thine eyes.
(Luke 19:38,42)
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John 14:27• 27Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you: not as the world giveth, give I unto you. Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid. (John 14:27)
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John 16:33• 33These things I have spoken unto you, that in me ye might have peace. In the world ye shall have tribulation: but be of good cheer; I have overcome the world. (John 16:33)
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Acts 10:36• 36The word which God sent unto the children of Israel, preaching peace by Jesus Christ: (he is Lord of all:) (Acts 10:36)
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2 Cor. 5:18‑20• 18And all things are of God, who hath reconciled us to himself by Jesus Christ, and hath given to us the ministry of reconciliation;
19To wit, that God was in Christ, reconciling the world unto himself, not imputing their trespasses unto them; and hath committed unto us the word of reconciliation.
20Now then we are ambassadors for Christ, as though God did beseech you by us: we pray you in Christ's stead, be ye reconciled to God.
(2 Cor. 5:18‑20)
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Eph. 2:14‑17• 14For he is our peace, who hath made both one, and hath broken down the middle wall of partition between us;
15Having abolished in his flesh the enmity, even the law of commandments contained in ordinances; for to make in himself of twain one new man, so making peace;
16And that he might reconcile both unto God in one body by the cross, having slain the enmity thereby:
17And came and preached peace to you which were afar off, and to them that were nigh.
(Eph. 2:14‑17)
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Col. 1:20• 20And, having made peace through the blood of his cross, by him to reconcile all things unto himself; by him, I say, whether they be things in earth, or things in heaven. (Col. 1:20)
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Col. 3:15• 15And let the peace of God rule in your hearts, to the which also ye are called in one body; and be ye thankful. (Col. 3:15)
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1 Thess. 5:23• 23And the very God of peace sanctify you wholly; and I pray God your whole spirit and soul and body be preserved blameless unto the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ. (1 Thess. 5:23)
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2 Thess. 3:16• 16Now the Lord of peace himself give you peace always by all means. The Lord be with you all. (2 Thess. 3:16)
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Heb. 13:20• 20Now the God of peace, that brought again from the dead our Lord Jesus, that great shepherd of the sheep, through the blood of the everlasting covenant, (Heb. 13:20)
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James 2:23• 23And the scripture was fulfilled which saith, Abraham believed God, and it was imputed unto him for righteousness: and he was called the Friend of God. (James 2:23)
through.

J. N. Darby Translation

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Therefore having been justified on the principle of faith, we have peace towards God through our Lord Jesus Christ;

W. Kelly Translation

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Having then, been justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ1:

WK Translation Notes

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we: [The American correctors of the RV] are quite right in preferring "we" to "let us" as the Revisers say. The change of ο to ω is one of the most frequent errors in the oldest copies; and this accounts for the subjunctive displacing the indicative to the grievous detriment of the sense, whatever ingenious pleaders may argue to the contrary. (Bible Treasury 14:351-352)
have: This is an instance of a reading which differs from that given in the great majority of first-class authorities (the Sinai, Alexandrian, Vatican, Rescript of Paris, Clermont, many excellent cursives, ancient versions, and fathers), yet, as it appears to me, decidedly most in keeping with the requirements of the context. For ἔχωμεν ("let us have") brings in an exhortation which agrees neither with what goes before nor with what follows, as the christian reader can judge for himself. The fact is that nothing is easier than to account for the various reading, for the interchange of the short with the long vowel or a diphthong that corresponds to it is most familiar to all acquainted with the critical history of the text. Thus inadvertence may have introduced the long ω instead of the short ο. Besides, the subjunctive suits man’s mind, when conscious of want Godward (and such is the state of most), rather than the indicative which expresses the blessing possessed already. Just so we see in 1 Corinthians 15, as another has remarked, where the Vatican stands alone of the Uncials in supporting some modern copies against the mass of ancient MSS., which favor an unquestionable error. א, A, C, D, E, F, G, J, K, with the great majority of cursives, the Italic, Vulgate, Coptic, Gothic, Sclavonic, and many ancient ecclesiastical writers read φορέσωμεν, the subjunctive instead of the indicative, as in the common and correct text. (Bible Treasury 7:61, Notes on Romans, p. 57)
have: Does it not show rather how precarious is Dr. [Salmon]’s critical judgment? For the question between ο and ω is precisely one of that class as to which the ancient manuscripts are least reliable. Whether we can best account for their frequent lapses in the interchange of these letters by ignorant copyists deceived by the ear may be a question; but the fact that the most ancient and best cannot be depended on in such cases is certain. Compare 1 Corinthians 15:49, Hebrews 12:28. This explains why the reading of several of the oldest MSS. may be merely a clerical blunder. If Tischendorf is gone over to ἔχωμεν with the uncorrected text of the Sinai, with Vat., Alex., etc., Lachmann abandoned it for ἔχομεν in his maturer edition. There is no deficiency whatever in external authority, for the majority of uncials, and cursives, supports ἔχομεν. The criterion for a spiritual mind under such circumstances is the bearing of the context: and, if so, I have not a doubt that this reading and not ἔχωμεν is required by the scope of the verse and the argument generally. But the odd thing is that Dr. S. himself accepts the reading ἔχομεν, "we have." If so on solid grounds, why is it precarious to use it? If he have no solid grounds, why "prefer" it? (Bible Treasury 9:317,318)
have: Very excellent and ancient MSS. read ἔχωμεν, which however to my mind suits not the context, for this is doctrine, not exhortation. It is well known that the best copies often faultily interchange ω with ο, as I presume they did here. Under such circumstances internal evidence is entitled to great weight. Thus in 1 Corinthians 15:49 the authorities (save B. and very few others) read φορέωμεν, which, I am bold to say, no sober Christian of intelligence can accept as in keeping with the context or even sound doctrine. (Notes on Romans, 12.)
have: none can be surprised to hear that the Revisers adopt for their text "let us have" for "we have," though in Greek it is only the question of a long for a short o, letters habitually confounded (Itacism as it is called) in the best and oldest MSS. The diplomatic groundwork, though seemingly strong beyond measure, is therefore really precarious, unless the context be also clear and sure. But in my judgment the dogmatic or inferential, not exhortatory, character in this part of the epistle decidedly demands the indicative rather than the subjunctive in chapter 5:1, 2, 3, as is strongly confirmed by the structure of verse 11, which does not admit of the latter. But souls weak in the gospel would naturally incline to the subjunctive of old as now. (Bible Treasury 13:350)