Rev. 5:9 KJV (With Strong’s)

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9
And
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
they sung
aido (Greek #103)
to sing
KJV usage: sing.
Pronounce: ad'-o
a new
kainos (Greek #2537)
new (especially in freshness; while 3501 is properly so with respect to age
KJV usage: new.
Pronounce: kahee-nos'
Origin: of uncertain affinity
song
oide (Greek #5603)
a chant or "ode" (the general term for any words sung; while 5215 denotes especially a religious metrical composition, and 5568 still more specially, a Hebrew cantillation)
KJV usage: song.
Pronounce: o-day'
Origin: from 103
n, saying
lego (Greek #3004)
properly, to "lay" forth, i.e. (figuratively) relate (in words (usually of systematic or set discourse; whereas 2036 and 5346 generally refer to an individual expression or speech respectively; while 4483 is properly to break silence merely, and 2980 means an extended or random harangue)); by implication, to mean
KJV usage: ask, bid, boast, call, describe, give out, name, put forth, say(-ing, on), shew, speak, tell, utter.
Pronounce: leg'-o
Origin: a primary verb
, Thou art
ei (Greek #1488)
thou art
KJV usage: art, be.
Pronounce: i
Origin: second person singular present of 1510
worthy
axios (Greek #514)
deserving, comparable or suitable (as if drawing praise)
KJV usage: due reward, meet, (un-)worthy.
Pronounce: ax'-ee-os
Origin: probably from 71
to take
lambano (Greek #2983)
to take (in very many applications, literally and figuratively (properly objective or active, to get hold of; whereas 1209 is rather subjective or passive, to have offered to one; while 138 is more violent, to seize or remove))
KJV usage: accept, + be amazed, assay, attain, bring, X when I call, catch, come on (X unto), + forget, have, hold, obtain, receive (X after), take (away, up).
Pronounce: lam-ban'-o
Origin: a prolonged form of a primary verb, which is use only as an alternate in certain tenses
the book
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
biblion (Greek #975)
a roll
KJV usage: bill, book, scroll, writing.
Pronounce: bib-lee'-on
Origin: a diminutive of 976
, and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
to open
anoigo (Greek #455)
to open up (literally or figuratively, in various applications)
KJV usage: open.
Pronounce: an-oy'-go
Origin: from 303 and οἴγω (to open)
the seals
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
sphragis (Greek #4973)
a signet (as fencing in or protecting from misappropriation); by implication, the stamp impressed (as a mark of privacy, or genuineness), literally or figuratively
KJV usage: seal.
Pronounce: sfrag-ece'
Origin: probably strengthened from 5420
thereof
autos (Greek #846)
the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the comparative 1438) of the third person , and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons
KJV usage: her, it(-self), one, the other, (mine) own, said, (self-), the) same, ((him-, my-, thy- )self, (your-)selves, she, that, their(-s), them(-selves), there(-at, - by, -in, -into, -of, -on, -with), they, (these) things, this (man), those, together, very, which. Compare 848.
Pronounce: ow-tos'
Origin: from the particle αὖ (perhaps akin to the base of 109 through the idea of a baffling wind) (backward)
: for
hoti (Greek #3754)
demonstrative, that (sometimes redundant); causative, because
KJV usage: as concerning that, as though, because (that), for (that), how (that), (in) that, though, why.
Pronounce: hot'-ee
Origin: neuter of 3748 as conjunction
thou wast slain
sphazo (Greek #4969)
to butcher (especially an animal for food or in sacrifice) or (generally) to slaughter, or (specially), to maim (violently)
KJV usage: kill, slay, wound.
Pronounce: sfad'-zo
Origin: a primary verb
, and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
hast redeemed
agorazo (Greek #59)
properly, to go to market, i.e. (by implication) to purchase; specially, to redeem
KJV usage: buy, redeem.
Pronounce: ag-or-ad'-zo
Origin: from 58
us
hemas (Greek #2248)
us
KJV usage: our, us, we.
Pronounce: hay-mas'
Origin: accusative case plural of 1473
to God
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
theos (Greek #2316)
a deity, especially (with 3588) the supreme Divinity; figuratively, a magistrate; by Hebraism, very
KJV usage: X exceeding, God, god(-ly, -ward).
Pronounce: theh'-os
Origin: of uncertain affinity
by
en (Greek #1722)
"in," at, (up-)on, by, etc.
KJV usage: about, after, against, + almost, X altogether, among, X as, at, before, between, (here-)by (+ all means), for (... sake of), + give self wholly to, (here-)in(-to, -wardly), X mightily, (because) of, (up-)on, (open-)ly, X outwardly, one, X quickly, X shortly, (speedi-)ly, X that, X there(-in, -on), through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), under, when, where(-with), while, with(-in). Often used in compounds, with substantially the same import; rarely with verbs of motion, and then not to indicate direction, except (elliptically) by a separate (and different) preposition.
Pronounce: en
Origin: a primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), i.e. a relation of rest (intermediate between 1519 and 1537)
thy
sou (Greek #4675)
of thee, thy
KJV usage: X home, thee, thine (own), thou, thy.
Pronounce: soo
Origin: genitive case of 4771
blood
ho (Greek #3588)
the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom)
KJV usage: the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.
Pronounce: ho
Origin: ἡ (hay), and the neuter τό (to) in all their inflections
haima (Greek #129)
blood, literally (of men or animals), figuratively (the juice of grapes) or specially (the atoning blood of Christ); by implication, bloodshed, also kindred
KJV usage: blood.
Pronounce: hah'-ee-mah
Origin: of uncertain derivation
q out
ek (Greek #1537)
or ἐξ (ex) a primary preposition denoting origin (the point whence action or motion proceeds), from, out (of place, time, or cause; literal or figurative; direct or remote)
KJV usage: after, among, X are, at, betwixt(-yond), by (the means of), exceedingly, (+ abundantly above), for(- th), from (among, forth, up), + grudgingly, + heartily, X heavenly, X hereby, + very highly, in, ...ly, (because, by reason) of, off (from), on, out among (from, of), over, since, X thenceforth, through, X unto, X vehemently, with(-out). Often used in composition, with the same general import; often of completion.
Pronounce: ek
of every
pas (Greek #3956)
apparently a primary word; all, any, every, the whole
KJV usage: all (manner of, means), alway(-s), any (one), X daily, + ever, every (one, way), as many as, + no(-thing), X thoroughly, whatsoever, whole, whosoever.
Pronounce: pas
Origin: including all the forms of declension
kindred
phule (Greek #5443)
an offshoot, i.e. race or clan
KJV usage: kindred, tribe.
Pronounce: foo-lay'
Origin: from 5453 (compare 5444)
r, and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
tongue
glossa (Greek #1100)
the tongue; by implication, a language (specially, one naturally unacquired)
KJV usage: tongue.
Pronounce: gloce-sah'
Origin: of uncertain affinity
, and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
people
laos (Greek #2992)
a people (in general; thus differing from 1218, which denotes one's own populace)
KJV usage: people.
Pronounce: lah-os'
Origin: apparently a primary word
, and
kai (Greek #2532)
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words
KJV usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.
Pronounce: kahee
Origin: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force
nation
ethnos (Greek #1484)
a race (as of the same habit), i.e. a tribe; specially, a foreign (non-Jewish) one (usually, by implication, pagan)
KJV usage: Gentile, heathen, nation, people.
Pronounce: eth'-nos
Origin: probably from 1486
;

Cross References

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Ministry on This Verse

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sung.
Rev. 7:10‑12• 10And they cry with a loud voice, saying, Salvation to our God who sits upon the throne, and to the Lamb.
11And all the angels stood around the throne, and the elders, and the four living creatures, and fell before the throne upon their faces, and worshipped God,
12saying, Amen: Blessing, and glory, and wisdom, and thanksgiving, and honour, and power, and strength, to our God, to the ages of ages. Amen.
(Rev. 7:10‑12)
;
Rev. 14:3• 3and they sing a new song before the throne, and before the four living creatures and the elders. And no one could learn that song save the hundred and forty-four thousand who were bought from the earth. (Rev. 14:3)
;
Psa. 33:3• 3Sing unto him a new song; play skilfully with a loud sound. (Psa. 33:3)
;
Psa. 40:3• 3And he hath put a new song in my mouth, praise unto our God. Many shall see it, and fear, and shall confide in Jehovah. (Psa. 40:3)
;
Psa. 96:1• 1Sing ye unto Jehovah a new song: sing unto Jehovah, all the earth. (Psa. 96:1)
;
Psa. 98:1• 1A Psalm. Sing ye unto Jehovah a new song: for he hath done wondrous things; his right hand and his holy arm hath wrought salvation for him. (Psa. 98:1)
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Psa. 144:9• 9O God, I will sing a new song unto thee; with the ten-stringed lute will I sing psalms unto thee: (Psa. 144:9)
;
Psa. 149:1• 1Hallelujah! Sing unto Jehovah a new song; sing his praise in the congregation of the godly. (Psa. 149:1)
;
Isa. 42:10• 10Sing unto Jehovah a new song, his praise from the end of the earth, ye that go down to the sea, and all that is therein, the isles and their inhabitants. (Isa. 42:10)
Thou art.
for.
and hast.
Rev. 14:4,6• 4These are they who have not been defiled with women, for they are virgins: these are they who follow the Lamb wheresoever it goes. These have been bought from men as first-fruits to God and to the Lamb:
6And I saw another angel flying in mid-heaven, having the everlasting glad tidings to announce to those settled on the earth, and to every nation and tribe and tongue and people,
(Rev. 14:4,6)
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Matt. 20:28• 28as indeed the Son of man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life a ransom for many. (Matt. 20:28)
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Matt. 26:28• 28For this is my blood, that of the new covenant, that shed for many for remission of sins. (Matt. 26:28)
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Acts 20:28• 28Take heed therefore to yourselves, and to all the flock, wherein the Holy Spirit has set you as overseers, to shepherd the assembly of God, which he has purchased with the blood of his own. (Acts 20:28)
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Rom. 3:24‑26• 24being justified freely by his grace through the redemption which is in Christ Jesus;
25whom God has set forth a mercy-seat, through faith in his blood, for the shewing forth of his righteousness, in respect of the passing by the sins that had taken place before, through the forbearance of God;
26for the shewing forth of his righteousness in the present time, so that he should be just, and justify him that is of the faith of Jesus.
(Rom. 3:24‑26)
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1 Cor. 6:20• 20for ye have been bought with a price: glorify now then God in your body. (1 Cor. 6:20)
;
1 Cor. 7:23• 23Ye have been bought with a price; do not be the bondmen of men. (1 Cor. 7:23)
;
Eph. 1:7• 7in whom we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of offences, according to the riches of his grace; (Eph. 1:7)
;
Col. 1:14• 14in whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins; (Col. 1:14)
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Titus 2:14• 14who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all lawlessness, and purify to himself a peculiar people, zealous for good works. (Titus 2:14)
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Heb. 11:14• 14For they who say such things shew clearly that they seek their country. (Heb. 11:14)
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1 Peter 1:18‑19• 18knowing that ye have been redeemed, not by corruptible things, as silver or gold, from your vain conversation handed down from your fathers,
19but by precious blood, as of a lamb without blemish and without spot, the blood of Christ,
(1 Peter 1:18‑19)
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2 Peter 2:1• 1But there were false prophets also among the people, as there shall be also among you false teachers, who shall bring in by the bye destructive heresies, and deny the master that bought them, bringing upon themselves swift destruction; (2 Peter 2:1)
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1 John 1:7• 7But if we walk in the light as *he* is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus Christ his Son cleanses us from all sin. (1 John 1:7)
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1 John 2:2• 2and *he* is the propitiation for our sins; but not for ours alone, but also for the whole world. (1 John 2:2)
out.
 “Redeemed us to God,” “made us” and “we shall reign” should read, “Redeemed to God,” “made them”and “they shall reign.” The glorified saints are here singing praises to the Lamb who had been slain and who had bought the suffering remnant that will be slain and eventually reign with the heavenly saints over the earth (ch. 20:45 JND). (Help on Hard Verses by A.C. Brown)
 They [elders] are speaking about the saints whose prayers they were offering As they were occupied with their prayers, so here they were praising the Lord for His goodness to the saints still on earth. (Revelation 5 by J.N. Darby)
 not “they sung,” but “they sing.” (Lectures on Revelation 5 by W. Kelly)

J. N. Darby Translation

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9
And they sing a new song, saying, Thou art worthy to take the book, and to open its seals; because thou hast been slain, and hast redeemedk to God, by thy blood, out of every tribe, and tongue, and people, and nation,

JND Translation Notes

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k
Or "bought," as ch. 14.3,4.

W. Kelly Translation

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9
aAnd they sing a new song, saying, Thou art worthy to take the book and to open the seals thereof: for thou wast slain and hast bought [us] to God by thy blood out of every tribe and tongue and people and nation;

WK Translation Notes

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a
sing: [In the RV] it is "sing," not "sung." (Bible Treasury 14:144)
bought: "Purchase" is right, not "redeem." (Bible Treasury 14:144) [See note to 2 Peter 2:1]
[us]: A. reads ᾄδωσιν, and, with 41. (adding ἠμῶν) Æth., omits ἠμᾶς, contrary to B. and the mass, six of which, etc., give ἠμᾶς before τῷ θεῷ, while Er., some Vv. and Ff., omit τ. θ. altogether. (Rev. of John, 1860, p.16)
[us]: Rec. Gr. Kn. Sz. Ln. Treg. ἠμᾶς Tisch. rejects (with A.) (Prospect 1:155)
[us]: Now, I am of opinion that both external and internal evidence would lead a competent judge to the conclusion that the word "us" should be absent from the ninth verse. It would seem probable that copyists inserted ἠμᾶς ("us") there—not that this is at all necessary or peculiar to any views I hold. (Some years since Professor Tischendorf reported to me, among other Apocalyptic readings, that the Sinai MS. omitted the pronoun ἠμᾶς in Rev. 5:9. This I printed on his authority, which was followed by Dean Alford and others. But when the great uncial was published, I immediately perceived either that the printed text was here wrong, or that the discoverer had led me into an error, awkward to many more though to none so painfully as me. But he had the candor immediately to re-examine the MS. on my appeal to him, and to confess frankly that he had misled me. Very different was the feeling of a scholar in this country from whom better things might have been expected. He had the temerity not alone to charge me with the fault but to mix up with it the doctrine of the rapture of the church, as if this had influenced the erroneous report. The truth is, that the weighty evidence lies in the fact that, according to the best authorities, followed even by my censor himself, it should be "them" and "they" in verse 10 (as required by the true Greek text). The elders and living creatures are praising the Lamb in that verse for others made kings and priests, not for themselves. This is incontestable. The point debated is whether ἠμᾶς should or should not be read in the preceding. Even if it ought certainly to be read, it would rather strengthen the distinction between the saints represented by the elders and living creatures. But I was willing to waive what would rather fortify my position, as honestly believing with the best critics that it is a most suspicious reading, if not certainly on external evidence an intruder.
And I was convinced, as I am still, that its insertion presents a sense (when the two verses are taken together) so strange that nobody has yet offered a tolerable explanation. It is therefore still more objectionable on internal grounds. But the question is really independent of doctrine, and is much more one of critical acumen and of spiritual judgment.) The most competent enquirers who have no settled interpretation of the book or schemes opposed to mine, agree in omitting it. Thus the most famous editor of the day holds it—the Lutheran Tischendorf. Another excellent scholar, who was when living rather more of a rationalist, holds the same thing I allude to Lachmann. Again, Dean Alford, of this country, and many more, accept the same reading, agreeing as far as this is concerned.
I refer to these various well-known names openly, that none may allow the groundless thought that there is anything peculiar or individual in this judgment. These matters are the common heritage of the church of God; they rest on facts that cannot be gainsaid by anybody except the ignorant. (Pamphlets, p.368)
[us]: Supposing we do not accept the reading ἀμᾶς or "us" (which I am quite willing, with Lachmann, Tischendorf, and others, to allow may not be genuine), still they are clearly saints who thus address the Lamb. (Pamphlets, p.388)
[us]: In chap. 5:9 it is the worth of the Buyer, and consequently the value of the price paid, that is celebrated, not the liberated state of the redeemed. Hence in the text ἠμᾶς is not found—an omission as hard to account for, unless it be the truth, in A., 44, Aeth., as it is easy to understand its insertion in all the other witnesses. (Bible Treasury N6:282, Bible Treasury 16:280)
[us]: [Q. Do not the best readings give an entirely different meaning to Rev. 5:9,10, from than represented by the Authorized Version? A SEEKER AFTER TRUTH.]
A. The only question as to readings of importance in verse 9 is the insertion or omission of ἠμᾶς. The Sinaitic and Vatican (2066, not 1209), with the great majority of minuscules insert; the Parisian Rescript is defective; the Alexandrian and a minuscule in the Propag. at Rome (44) omit. To this last, though the evidence be small, recent editors (Alford, Lachmann, Tischendorf, etc.) incline. It seems to me confirmed by the true text of verse 10, which exhibits, without question, the third and not the first person ("they," not "we")... If ἠμᾶς be, as I suppose, rightly omitted (the insertion being due to an early corrector who could not account for the absence of an object after the verb, from ignorance of such an ellipse, which is not uncommon with John), there is no necessity for taking the ζῶα as the redeemed; for the song would then simply celebrate the Lamb's worthiness and His efficacious death in purchasing a people to God, priests and kings to reign over the earth, without here defining who they are. (Bible Treasury 6:288)
[us]: A very important change occurs in this verse, well known to every person tolerably acquainted with the original scriptures. Persons who have studied the most ancient manuscripts and other witnesses of this book all agree that it is, "and hast made them to our God kings (or a kingdom) and priests" (ver. 10)... Indeed, I am prepared to go farther, and am bound to state my firm impression that in the ninth verse the word "us" was put in by copyists who supposed that the elders were celebrating their own blessing. (It cannot be denied that the true readings of Rev. 5:9-10, are some of them unusually hard to be decided. Out of five there are four uncial MSS. available, one of the oldest being deficient from Rev. 3:19 to 5:16. The versions too are conflicting, and so are the editors. There is no doubt, however, that we are obliged to read αὐτούς, "them" (and not ἠμᾶς, "us") in verse 10, on the authority of the four uncials (the palimpsest of Paris being here deficient and so leaving us one short), forty cursives, and many ancient versions. But evidently that substitution, true and certain as it is, of them for "us" in verse 10, obscures or destroys the connection with the preceding verse, if "us" is supposed to hold its ground in verse 9. And this is the more noticeable, as both clauses form part of the same song in the mouth of the same personages. For what more incongruous than "redeemed us...and made them," when no other class has been referred to between the clauses? Hence the strangest solutions of the difficulty have been proposed. Thus Prof. M. Stuart, who takes for granted the correctness of the text of Griesbach and Scholz, refers the αὐτούς of verse 10 to φυλῆς, γλώσσης κ. τ. λ. i.e. "thou has made every tribe," etc., "to be kings and priests." Now, limit this as you may, it is a construction awkward in the extreme, and without parallel in St. John, or perhaps in any other author. Besides, it ignores, instead of solving, the enigma. For ἠμᾶς ἐκ is left out of the result, and if the same party is intended (as Prof. S. thinks), the question is, why should "us" be used in verse 9, and "them" in verse 10? The alternative to which the Professor is reduced, of portioning out this short song between the living creatures and the elders, and thus accounting for the change in the pronouns, strikes one as an evidence of the difficulty rather than of its removal. Singular to say, he alludes to the true key, as it seems to me, as if it had no authority beyond the conjecture of an eccentric German. The truth is that in one of the best manuscripts (A or the Codex Alexandrinus) which contain the passage, ἠμᾶς in verse 9 does not appear; nor is any equivalent given in one of the oldest extant versions—the Aethiopic of the fourth century. It is also wanting in a cursive MS. known as Codex Borgiae. I admit that in this case the amount of testimony is far from being considerable. Nevertheless the omission seemed probable to Griesbach; and in fact it is dropped in some of the latest editions of the Greek Testament, which appeal to ancient authority. Tischendorf omitted it from the first, as he does still: Lachmann had it in his earlier manual, but erased it in his second and more correct edition: and the younger Buttmann has it not in his recent manual Greek Testament (Leipsic, 1856): so Dean Alford. These critics have arrived at that conclusion on independent principles, and on purely external grounds. If it be sound, the construction is elliptical but frequent, especially in the writings of St. John (compare John 16:17; 2 John 4; Rev. 2:10; 3:9; 11:9). There can be no objection, therefore, on the score of phraseology, but, on the contrary, the sentence runs quite in his style without ἠμᾶς. Some scribe, ignorant of this, and supposing that the saints in heaven must needs sing there of their own redemption, as they had done on earth (chap. 1:5-6), may have inserted the first ἠμᾶς. This, in turn, producing a jar with the αὐτούς in the following verse, would naturally require the further demand of taking its place there; and that again would lead to the change in the person of the verb in the last clause. The internal considerations I believe to be very weighty in favor of the omission; but these have been, perhaps, sufficiently given above in the text. The reading ἠγόρασας τῷ θεῷ (as in Cod. 44) appears to be the original text. The Alexandrian MS. which is the nearest among those that diverge, followed pretty closely by the Aethiopic, omits ἠμῶν in verse 9 and τῷ θεῷ ἠμῶν in verse 10. But these words are unquestionably genuine, and add much to the proof that the elders praised the Lamb for His redemption of others, distinct from themselves....
It is also a serious mistake to say that the sense is "substantially the same," whether we have us or they in verse 10. Again, the Sinaitic and Porphyrian MSS. turn the scale in favor of the twenty-two cursives, and the better ancient versions, which support βασιλεύσουσιν against A B, eighteen cursives, etc., exhibiting the present tense. But ἠμᾶς and βασιλεὺομεν are indefensible and manifestly the work of a meddling corrector. It is strange too that the question of the ellipse in verse 9 is passed over in silence, seeing that there "us" is, to say the least doubtful; and if spurious removes the main reason for viewing the ζῶα as redeemed. (Lect. on Rev., p. 118,119,121)
[us]: The true reading of these verses is a most difficult question, as to which MSS. and versions, fathers and editors, are conflicting enough. There is no doubt that we ought to read αὐτούς (and not ἠμᾶς) in verse 10, on the authority of the Alexandrian, Vatican, and forty other MSS. not to speak of many ancient versions. As to βασιλευσονται, it is a mistake of your Correspondent, no doubt, for βασιλεύσουσίν, which is supported by about twenty cursive manuscripts, etc. The two uncial MSS, with fifteen others, give βασιλεύουσιν. The valuable Codex Ephraemi Rescriptus affords no light on this passage, as there is a lacuna from Rev. 3:19 to 5:14. My opinion is, that the internal evidence is decidedly in favor of the former reading (i.e. shall reign), which differs by a single letter, that is often and easily dropped by a copyist. Assuming this, we have as the best approved text of verse 10, ἐποίησας αὐτοὺς ...β. κ.ἰ. καὶ βασιλεύσουσιν, "thou has made them...and they shall reign." But this preferable reading of αὐτούς in verse 10 sounds strangely with ἠμᾶς in the preceding verse, "redeemed us, and made them." In the two Leipsic editions of Tischendorf the difficulty disappears, for ἠμᾶς is omitted in verse 9, and the ellipse evidently refers to τῶν ἀγίων in verse 8, while it is referred to in αὐτούς (verse 10). This omission is made on the authority of the famous Alexandrian MS. and another generally known as Codex Borgiae, as well as of the AEthiopic version. Lachmann follows them in his edition of 1850, though he had given ἠμᾶς in that of 1831. Adopting the same, the text would be ἠγόρασας τῷ θεῷ ἐν τῷ αἴματί σου ἐκ πάσης φ. κ. γ. κ. λ. κ. ἔ. καὶ ἐποίησας αὐτοὺς κ. τ. λ. "Thou hast redeemed to God by thy blood [a people] out of every kindred, and tongue, and people, and nation, and hast made them," etc. This elliptical construction is frequent in St. John.... So far, therefore, from objection on the score of ellipse, it is plain that the text without ἠμᾶς adopted by Tischendorf and Lachmann, and considered probable by Griesbach, runs quite Johannically as to style. The internal evidence pleads strongly, I think, in the same direction. (Christian Annotator 1:324)
[us]: In Rev. 5:9-10, we have an exhibition of the text [in א] which commends itself strongly. I had bracketed ἠμᾶς in verse 9, as beyond a doubt suspicious, though unwilling to remove it absolutely from the text, as Lachmann and Tischendorf had done on the authority of A. 44. and the AEthiopic. The cursive, which was only written A.D. 1284, contained a point of difference from its venerable allies, which drew out no particular remark before. This may furnish a profitable reflection to such as despise the later mss. For it seems that in this very point it coincides with ν, perhaps the oldest Uncial extant, as it is certainly for the New Testament the most complete. In a word, א and 44. confirm A. and the Æthiopic in omitting ἠμᾶς, and differ from these, but agree with each other, in giving τῷ θεῷ ἠμῶν. Ἠμῶν was very naturally changed into ἠμᾶς by copyists who did not understand the elliptical construction of the passage. This insertion, not at all agreeing with αὐτούς and βασιλεύ. in the following verse, gave rise to further tampering there, where changes of αὐτούς into ὐμᾶς and of the verb βασιλεύ. were made to yield a sense consistent with the correction or interpolation of verse 9. Several cursives, as 7. 16. 31. 34. 35. 39.... 87., have ἠμᾶς τῷ θεῷ, which order seems to be supported by the Vulgate, Syriac, Armenian, and Arabic, and by the Western Fathers—all marking uncertainty here. It will be observed, also, that Codex Sinaiticus supports the twenty cursives and some of the best Latin mss. in βασιλεύσουσιν, contrary to AB. and eighteen juniors, which read βασιλεύουσια. The omission of σ was easy in the middle of a word; and, in fact, A. omits it in the same word in Rev. 20:6, where beyond question it should be read. (Rev. of John, 1860, xvii-xviii)
[us]: the very material change [in the RV] is the quasi-absolute use of ἠγόρασς by the omission of "us," for which the Revisers substitute "men." This is not only sustained by A 44, Aeth., but confirmed in the strongest way by the verse following (Bible Treasury 14:144)